Casting Directors : Who are they, what do they do, news, etc. - Page 3 - the Fashion Spot
 
How to Join
the Fashion Spot / Supporting Cast / The ETC's of the Modeling World
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
01-03-2015
  31
V.I.P.
 
anlabe32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Gender: femme
Posts: 7,699
I agree that Michelle Lee is just a mediocre casting director, but comparing her to Russell is not fair. Russell thrived in an era with a lot less competition amongst models. He may have made Daria Werbowy, Gemma Ward, Lara Stone etc stars, but so could anyone back then because the market wasn't flooded with hundreds of new girls every season.

Also, Ashley "created" the contemporary versions of those models, e.g. Amanda Murphy, Anna Ewers, Julia Bergshoeff etc.

Rodarte - Jennifer Vendetti

Vera Wang - John Pfeiffer/ Charlotte Stockdale

Stylist Carolina Herrera: Giovanna Battaglia
Stylist Derek Lam: Elissa Santisi

  Reply With Quote
01-03-2015
  32
V.I.P.
 
pellucid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Gender: femme
Posts: 6,039
Stereo_Flo made a pretty thorough list of who cast the FW14 shows but I suppose there's been a few changes since then.

Antonio Berardi - Rami / ?
David Koma - Piergiorgio del Moro / Elodie David-Touboul
Creatures of the Wind - Anita Bitton / Sara Moonves
Erdem - ? / Sara Moonves
Fausto Puglisi - Piergiorgio del Moro / Sissy Vian
Fay - Piergiorgio del Moro / ?
Fendi - Piergiorgio del Moro / Charlotte Stockdale
Marni - Russell Marsh / Lucinda Chambers
No. 21 - ? / Edward Enninful
Paul Smith - Russell Marsh / ?
Preen - AM Casting / Celestine Cooney
Rag & Bone - Ashley Brokaw assisted by Juliun Williams / Vanessa Reid assisted by Danielle van Camp
Roberto Cavalli - Marabini & Baiocchi / Nancy Rohde

Nancy Rohde styles 3.1 Phillip Lim

  Reply With Quote
02-03-2015
  33
V.I.P.
 
kevinnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: New York, NY
Gender: homme
Posts: 5,134
Some other changes/additions:

*Acne Studios - Jess Hallett/Vanessa Reid
*Chloe - Michelle Lee/Jane How
*Fendi - Piergiorgio Del Moro/Charlotte Stockdale
*Hugo Boss - Ashley Brokaw/Joe McKenna
*Stella McCartney - James Scully/Jane How
*Tom Ford - James Scully/Carine Roitfeld

  Reply With Quote
03-03-2015
  34
V.I.P.
 
anlabe32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Gender: femme
Posts: 7,699
I believe Carine is not with Tom Ford anymore.

  Reply With Quote
03-03-2015
  35
V.I.P.
 
anlabe32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Gender: femme
Posts: 7,699
Anthony Vaccarello: Piergiorgio Del Moro/ Alastair McKimm

  Reply With Quote
 
05-03-2015
  36
V.I.P.
 
MayaStar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Minsk
Gender: femme
Posts: 4,371
CD and stylist of Chanel shows?

__________________
mayastarblog.com
  Reply With Quote
05-03-2015
  37
fashion elite
 
Lola701's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: france
Gender: femme
Posts: 2,680
Quote:
Originally Posted by anlabe32 View Post
I believe Carine is not with Tom Ford anymore.
I actually believe she is still with him. Not that much as before but she is still putting all her favorite girls in the shows.
I think we can add Piergiorgio Del Moro with Tom Ford as he was the casting director for the FW2014 & the Boys & Girls ads.

Quote:
CD and stylist of Chanel shows?
A mystery as Karl is very loyal and use his current & past favorite girls. Add to that Carine's girls & possibly Amanda Harlech & Charlotte S girls...
Maybe Piergiorgio is involved as he is a Carine/Fendi favorite.
But Chanel shows are less exclusives than Fendi in a way so i believe that Chanel shows's casts are a combination of all.

For the stylist, it's done in-house. However, looks are always like Karl's original drawings.


Last edited by Lola701; 05-03-2015 at 04:53 AM.
  Reply With Quote
05-03-2015
  38
V.I.P.
 
MayaStar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Minsk
Gender: femme
Posts: 4,371
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lola701 View Post
I actually believe she is still with him. Not that much as before but she is still putting all her favorite girls in the shows.
I think we can add Piergiorgio Del Moro with Tom Ford as he was the casting director for the FW2014 & the Boys & Girls ads.



A mystery as Karl is very loyal and use his current & past favorite girls. Add to that Carine's girls & possibly Amanda Harlech & Charlotte S girls...
Maybe Piergiorgio is involved as he is a Carine/Fendi favorite.
But Chanel shows are less exclusives than Fendi in a way so i believe that Chanel shows's casts are a combination of all.

For the stylist, it's done in-house. However, looks are always like Karl's original drawings.
Thank you very much for the answer!

__________________
mayastarblog.com
  Reply With Quote
05-03-2015
  39
tfs star
 
saucer-like's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,938
Maybe at the end of the season, a master list can be posted? Also, perhaps the lists posted in the casting threads from the previous seasons can be copied over here too.

  Reply With Quote
10-03-2015
  40
V.I.P.
 
CATO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Germany - Munich
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,590
who is the CD from:

Trussardi
Dolce Gabbana
Francesco Scognamiglio
Giorgio Armani
Missoni
NO 21
Chanel
Hermes
Isabel Marant
Mugler

  Reply With Quote
10-03-2015
  41
V.I.P.
 
Creative's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Gender: homme
Posts: 4,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lola701 View Post
However, looks are always like Karl's original drawings.
Nope. That's just for HC. Chanel ready-to-wear is designed by a loooot of people.

  Reply With Quote
11-03-2015
  42
V.I.P.
 
HeatherAnne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 23,482
A Top Casting Director on How Instagram Has Changed the Modeling Game
Quote:
A Top Casting Director on How Instagram Has Changed the Modeling Game

By Véronique Hyland

Noah Shelley has worked on some of the most talked-about shows of fashion month. You have him (and his casting agency, AM Casting, which he runs with Angus Munro) to thank for the group of apocalypse survivors at Kanye West’s Yeezy Season 1 show, the step team at Rick Owens a few seasons back, and the models mugging with Stormtroopers at Preen. Shelley has also cast influential campaigns for CK One, Kenzo, Diesel, Uniqlo, and DKNY, among others, and is the casting director for Dazed and Confused. Here, he talks about how Instagram has changed the casting hierarchy, why his interest in street-scouting models has ebbed, and whether body diversity on the runway is really changing.


When did you notice that using Instagram for casting was starting to catch on?
The first time it was really intentional was when I worked on the CK One [TV commercial] that’s out right now. Every shot is designed to look like the models or people in it are taking a selfie or FaceTimeing. So whether it’s Edie Campbell or Petra Collins or Michael Bailey Gates or Ali Michael, it’s all these people [posing] like they’re taking a picture or dancing for YouTube. That campaign is very specific and they came to us with that concept, so we obviously went in that direction with the casting. But it wasn’t the first time that we used social media to cast. [Pre-Instagram,] somebody would say, "Oh we need an 'It' girl for something," and I'd wonder how to find those girls. You had to know them, you had to be kind of in with a scene, or understand who the celebutantes were; who was the cool DJ. And then at some point, when street style became so prevalent, you could find a hundred different websites dedicated just to interviewing these girls about the cool look they have. Then Instagram skyrocketed the whole thing, because you can follow someone. These people have followers, so they’re already generating fame on their own.


Now you don’t just have to be beautiful and well-dressed — you have to have an enviable life and an enviable apartment and go to exciting places.
I used to look to Todd Selby’s site, because you could sell people to a client very quickly by saying, Look at them, they’re interesting! The fact that Bill Gentle or Scott Schuman or Todd Selby went out of their way to be like, Hey, I’m not only going to take a picture, I’m going to take ten — for me, it was definitely the beginning of an Instagram-like moment, where you find somebody and then you’re like, Oh, let me go through their history and see what they’re all about. I just had a guy backstage saying that now they have interns at the model agencies going through Instagram and looking for people with large followings, and they’re just signing them.


Do they find them from just stumbling on different chains of people, or do they look for specific hashtags?
That’s a good question. I’ve never even actually searched a hashtag. I just stumble. I go spiraling down the rabbit hole, where I’ll just kind of look at one thing and then people tag each other. And I do the same thing on Facebook, too, where I’m trying to do a cool-kid casting, where you find one beautiful, stylish, attractive kid and you just kind of see who they hang out with and where it goes. I even have clients now that say, "We want to make sure [the models] have strong social media followings."


You do still street-cast people as well. What are the different results you get from street-casting versus Instagram-casting, and why do you like to mix the two?
I’m finding street-casting to be less and less effective. In New York, it’s very difficult. If you’re attractive, if you’re cool and you’re scouted in Soho by someone from my team, then you're probably already a model. Or if not, then they’re like, "Oh, I shot with Ryan McGinley." Or "I do modeling for Opening Ceremony." It’s very hard to discover raw talent on the street anymore. I find that my time is better used if I actually spend four or five hours on the internet or on Instagram than spending four or five hours walking around in the snow.


The opposite is true, however, when you really want something specific. There have been a lot of really interesting videos and editorials on the New York vogueing scene. You certainly could find one of those guys through the internet, or you could just go to one of their parties and take a ton of pictures.


Do you think that the rise of Instagram-casting has made for more ethnic diversity or more body-type diversity?
For a really long time, you had brands fighting for exclusives, and everyone was pretending to “find” these models, which is crazy because they’re rarely found — some agency sent out a bunch of pictures to all of us and she works for a client that has the money or the necessity to create an exclusive. But after a while, you start wanting a personality. I think that one of the great discomforts of the current situation in fashion modeling is that we’re not cultivating the careers of girls that are great for long enough, so that they become recyclable, which is not healthy. It all seems to be about turnover, anonymity, and not cultivating the girls, and I think somehow there’s been a reaction to that.


How do you keep it from feeling gimmicky? There's that cliché of "real-people" campaigns, where everyone has a skateboard. Will that eventually start to feel almost as cookie-cutter as "tall, blonde, tan girl"?
It is! And it will become that, easily. Everything does. It’s one thing to say, “Let’s do a bunch of real people in this way and feel unique,” but when all of a sudden you realize that 10 to 15 brands internationally are doing really the same concept, you’re kind of like, Oh, that’s the same idea. We’ve already hit a point where I have directors and ad agencies saying, “Hey, we want to find interesting people, but not, like, Skateboard Kid.” People are already being sarcastic about the clichés of street-casting.


I don’t see a variety of body types on the runway, but where I am starting to see it is campaigns and editorials. On a shoot, between Photoshopping and pinning clothes, you can make things look different and you can’t do that as much on a runway.
No, of course not — you still have to be relatively lithe.
nymag

__________________

  Reply With Quote
20-03-2015
  43
V.I.P.
 
HeatherAnne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 23,482
Quote:
Two Labels, One Casting Director: How Maria Giulia Azario Does It By Janelle Okwodu

Casting directors are tasked with a balancing act each season: finding the very best models to walk down their runways, while working within the constraints set by designers. For Maria Giulia Azario, who casts both Giamba and Giambattista Valli, a large portion of her role is finding a way to stay true to the identity of both labels while keeping the casts fresh and interesting. The Giamba brand’s girlishness and Giambattista Valli’s eccentric take on refinement may seem at odds, but Azario’s spirited casts brought a youthful energy to both runways. The use of a select set of models can create a visual link between a designer’s collections and also offer a casting director the chance to revisit standout girls. Azario talks to Style.com about the process behind her casting, how she defines each show’s woman, and which new faces grabbed her attention.

Where do you start when you’re getting ready for casting season?
For us it’s almost always casting season—between Giambattista Valli, Giambattista Valli Haute Couture, and Giamba, research is an ongoing process. I do scouting all year long. When I like a girl, I follow her until she is ready, and then we decide for which line she is more appropriate to interpret the philosophy of the collection.

How involved in the process is Giambattista?
Giambattista is very involved in the process, and of course he has the final decision. We luckily have the same taste and know each other so well that we almost don’t have to talk.

How would you describe the Giamba girl?
The Giamba girl is metropolitan, underground, real, one of a kind, spontaneous, girly, and modern. All that gives an enthusiasm to the collection, too. We are not looking for beauties, but we are looking for characters. It’s not about the nationality, it’s not about the hair color, the face—it’s all about personality. [This season] we really looked for new faces, we started doing exclusives, we took a lot of girls who never did shows before. Giambattista always liked new girls and Giamba gave us the opportunity to expand even more this concept.

What I enjoyed the most was the genuine excitement these girls had, training them how to walk and helping them with finding the good attitude before going in front of Giambattista.

How does that compare with the Giambattista Valli woman?
The GBV woman is effortless, intellectually seducing, one of a kind, aristocratic, extraordinary. Giambattista likes to refer to these women like young swans in balance with their own femininity. It’s all about legs, long arms, long necks—the attitude is the most important thing.

Which models have impressed you this season?
It’s a season full of real beauties. I have so many favorites. With some of them I have great memories. Roos Abels, who opened Giamba last season, also did our campaign and our Pre-Fall lookbook and she is a sweetheart. Annika Krijt worked a lot with us in Paris before the couture season and we love her. Amilna Estevão is a star and she is so funny. Noa Vermeer, who opened Giamba this season, is so smart and such a fast learner. Elizabeth Davison is great. And I think Paula Galecka and Sophia Ahrens are stunning. Lieke de Jong, Anisia Khurmatulina, Freja Sørensen, and Sofie Schultz—our exclusive girls—are amazing and such a pleasure to work with.

What makes you select a girl to open a show as opposed to just walking it?
Opening a show is something really special. Noa Vermeer, who opened Giamba, surprised me with her focus and professionalism, considering she is only 16 and that it was her first season. I first met her in January in Milan and I immediately fell in love with her. She was great, but her walk was not good. Then I met her again three weeks later and she was walking like a pro, so it was very easy for us to give her the opening spot. She has the perfect personality to embody the Giamba spirit.
We decided that the opener of Giambattista Valli would be Paula Galecka because she has a contemporary, superchic, effortless attitude. She is confident, secure, and her walk is perfect. We met her in Milan at Giamba and we immediately thought she would be perfect to open Giambattista Valli.

How do you create a cohesive cast?
It’s like composing. Each girl is a note. You have to get the right ones to get the good music.
style.com

__________________

  Reply With Quote
20-03-2015
  44
V.I.P.
 
pellucid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Gender: femme
Posts: 6,039
Anthony Vaccarello - Piergiorgio del Moro / Alastair McKimm
Dolce & Gabbana - Décio Santos / Tabitha Simmons
Dries van Noten - Russell Marsh / Dries van Noten
Christian Dior - Maida / Raf Simons
Giambattista Valli - Maria Giulia Azario / Edward Enninful
H&M Studio - John Pfeiffer / Robert Rydberg
Hermès - Maida / Melanie Ward
Lanvin - Patrizia Pilotti / Mélanie Huynh
Nina Ricci - Patrizia Pilotti / Suzanne Koller

Camilla Nickerson styles Alexander McQueen
Patrizia Pilotti casts Valentino


And it seems like Maida & Rami have gone their separate ways?


Last edited by pellucid; 20-03-2015 at 01:41 PM.
  Reply With Quote
20-03-2015
  45
V.I.P.
 
TheoG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Gender: homme
Posts: 4,066
Does the Runway Exclusive Model Matter Anymore?
By Janelle Okwodu
Quote:
The runway exclusive is something of a fashion institution—it’s a stamp of approval. It’s more than just proof that a model is special or unique. “For a model, this can literally break their career,” says casting director Daniel Peddle, who works with Drew Dasent at The Secret Gallery, the directors who select the cool casts for 3.1 Phillip Lim and Givenchy’s menswear collections. “They can be plucked from relative obscurity and in one season go from not being on anyone’s radar to then being in high demand for editorials, campaigns, and future shows.”

Brands like Alexander Wang, Prada, Saint Laurent, Calvin Klein, and Givenchy choose a handful of exclusives each season, and the models selected often go on to big things. Household names like Joan Smalls, Gemma Ward, and Behati Prinsloo began as exclusives, only to be pushed into the stratosphere, but for every Gemma or Joan, there are countless others who fall off the radar. In the past, a choice exclusive could also come with a spot in a campaign or the promise of meatier work down the line. Today the odds are less certain—runway work doesn’t always translate into editorial or advertising bookings. A label can have an army of new, exclusive models yet still select an established face or, in the current moment of high-profile stunt casting, a celebrity to front its campaign.

For some, the very idea of exclusives has become passé. Casting director Angus Munro of AM Casting, aka the man behind the chic lineups at Rick Owens, Kenzo, and Kanye West’s Adidas Originals presentation, finds the concept at odds with the pace of the modeling industry. “I think they had a relevance back in the day when models’ shelf lives were much longer,” says Munro. “In this almost disposable model culture where show girls last a few seasons at best, they really have no place. Rather than being an aesthetic statement of a girl perfectly embodying a collection, exclusives now rather smack of one-upmanship and muscle flexing between houses.”

The battle to launch a model can become competitive. With multiple shows often clamoring for the same models, the choice often comes down to prestige—or cold hard cash. “Not all labels can afford this expense,” points out Peddle. “So there is a certain amount of bragging rights in terms of designers being able to say, ‘We launched them.’” With designers building model clans left and right—Balmain’s army, Givenchy’s gang—being an exclusive can be a smart career move, but it can also serve to alienate models from other clients. “It is largely counterproductive for the models’ careers,” says Munro. “In a sea of great new faces every season, the girls who stand out to me and my clients are those that you see looking amazing at all the top shows, not the girl with one appearance as Look 23 covered in makeup at Saint Laurent!”

In recent years, the idea of semi-exclusives has emerged. Under a semi-exclusive, a model can’t do any shows beforehand but is free to explore her options after the show wraps up. “It’s a more modern way of doing things,” says casting director Shaun Beyen, the man behind shows like Maison Margiela and Bottega Veneta. “It lets the girl start with your show so it’s still her first, but she’s then able to have a full season and work with other people, which benefits her career.”

Still, brand exclusives often can serve as an introduction to the faces that will dominate the runways in a season or two. When insiders spot the right girl at the right show, it can whet their appetite for more, an advantage many of this season’s standouts may have on the competition when the next season rolls around. Peddle cites this season’s Prada exclusive Lineisy Montero as a prime example of a girl to watch in the coming months: “Next season she will be one of the girls many designers will want to book.”
style.com

  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
ashley, brokaw, casting, changed, director, directors, game, instagram, modeling, news
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:57 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2017 All rights reserved.