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01-04-2013
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Urban Stylin's Avatar
 
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she obviously doesnt know where the money is

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01-04-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsamg View Post
Saw something today I thought I'd post here from the ask.fm page for the modellingconfessions Tumblr, where people ask them questions about modelling even though 99% of what they say is wrong...




...baffling. Lol
It's so disappointing that many people subscribe to that same misconception. I personally don't follow any ANTM models so I cannot say anything about their careers but saying that commercial modeling is worthless and not lucrative is just a sad lie. Actually, there are people on thefashionspot who reinforce the same misconception.

I just don't understand why we, as model viewers, fans and part of the fashion audience, cannot be happy for a model who chooses to have a low profile, money making career so she can live happily.

Many of the horrible things we hear about the modeling industry is primarily surrounding the high fashion editorial/image industry: lack of success, dead end careers, issues surrounding face and body image, lack of money, lack of jobs, short career spans, obsession with youth. There's actually a very high rate of success in the commercial world if someone can get an agency. In the catalog world, many models can have a lucrative career well into their 30s, 40s, 50s and still have time to make outside investments and projects. If people think women in their 40s can't model, well, think again. Even 40 year old women wear stylish clothes, shoes, jewelry, lingerie and indulge in high end skincare. There are so many department stores, fashion lines and cosmetics brands devoted to those age ranges.

Mass market, "commercial" brands are also less likely to focus on disposable trends. So they don't reshoot a product line as often as a high fashion line. That's great for the model because they can earn usage (For example, a model shoots an image for an advertisement for 1 year for 30K which is then bought out again for the next year. She will be paid 30K again and maybe the company will offer a buyout rate for unlimited usage..).


Last edited by theBlueRider; 01-04-2013 at 06:35 PM.
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02-04-2013
  18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theBlueRider View Post
It's so disappointing that many people subscribe to that same misconception. I personally don't follow any ANTM models so I cannot say anything about their careers but saying that commercial modeling is worthless and not lucrative is just a sad lie. Actually, there are people on thefashionspot who reinforce the same misconception.

I just don't understand why we, as model viewers, fans and part of the fashion audience, cannot be happy for a model who chooses to have a low profile, money making career so she can live happily.

Many of the horrible things we hear about the modeling industry is primarily surrounding the high fashion editorial/image industry: lack of success, dead end careers, issues surrounding face and body image, lack of money, lack of jobs, short career spans, obsession with youth. There's actually a very high rate of success in the commercial world if someone can get an agency. In the catalog world, many models can have a lucrative career well into their 30s, 40s, 50s and still have time to make outside investments and projects. If people think women in their 40s can't model, well, think again. Even 40 year old women wear stylish clothes, shoes, jewelry, lingerie and indulge in high end skincare. There are so many department stores, fashion lines and cosmetics brands devoted to those age ranges.

Mass market, "commercial" brands are also less likely to focus on disposable trends. So they don't reshoot a product line as often as a high fashion line. That's great for the model because they can earn usage (For example, a model shoots an image for an advertisement for 1 year for 30K which is then bought out again for the next year. She will be paid 30K again and maybe the company will offer a buyout rate for unlimited usage..).
agreed 100%

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06-04-2013
  19
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^I also agree entirely.
And THANKS for starting this interesting thread!

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06-04-2013
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the girl in red on this cover is also a famous catalogue girl
pic nymag


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19-05-2013
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there are lots of commercial models who are relatively unknown outside fashion forums because the fashion industry puts more emphasis on the image models. if you ever look at an agencies blog, it focuses on the new faces or the girls who land an editorial in a top fashion magazine. a model could land an international television commercial for Nivea and the agency rather focus on another model who landed a Grazia editorial in some Asian country. Meanwhile, its the girl who landed the commercial that is keeping the agency afloat. I think the problem is agencies are still thinking the way they did in the 1980's. Catalog work is no longer considered below a fashion model. Even the most highly regarded models do a lot of commercial work because it pays well.

E-commerce was created because someone in the industry realized that models impact a buyer. People on Bellazon and UMC are always asking about catalog models because those models are healthy and pretty looking compared to a lot the image models we are seeing right now. Yes, there is room for everyone within the industry but sometimes the industry gets too far fetched. Yes, you want to have different but sometimes having too much different doesn't work. It's like opening up an ice cream store and only having odd flavors. Sometimes you have to sell vanilla and chocolate because it sells. There was this article a few years back saying that during the credit crunch, many advertisers were playing it safe using classic model types such as pretty beach blondes with blue eyes and tan brunettes who were ethnically ambiguous because they appeal to most people. Sometimes, classically good looking model works. That's why Kate Upton is so popular. I am not a fan of her but in a way she is different by being healthy and the All-American girl. She is reminiscent of a different time in fashion that the public seems to be going towards. A lot of my mothers friends who aren't into fashion have been talking about how thin models are getting and how in their day models had to be pretty if they wanted to be successful. Statements like that make me think normal people (non-fashion freaks) are sick of seeing edgy and super thin girls. Just look at Victoria Secret. The models they are using are so much thinner than they were using say 15 years ago. Sometimes I think models like Cindy, Claudia, and pretty any top model in the 1980's would be relegated to commercial boards of their agencies because they are too normal looking. I remember when the runway would have some models under 5'9". It wasn't odd for a model to be 5'7" and high fashion. Today, a lot of these runway girls are 6'0" and possess the same measurements of a 5'7" model.

The industry is changing. There is no doubt about that. With the publishing world going digital, its only a matter of time before the next big change happens. I don't know what that might be but one thing is certain: E-commerce girls are going to be even more popular because a lot of retail sites like Nasty Gal, Missguided, and ASOS are acknowledging the models they use, and some are even promoting them by letting their costumers getting to know them through interviews.

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21-05-2013
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Would the American Apparel girls fit i to this thread? I've been wondering who they are for a long time.

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21-05-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alstroe View Post
Would the American Apparel girls fit i to this thread? I've been wondering who they are for a long time.
No, American Apparel does what is called "street casting." They use non-professional models. They're usually girls they think are "cool" in some way like their personality or personal style. They don't fit into the physical model parameters and they might have other jobs like graphic designer, ballerina etc.

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21-05-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theBlueRider View Post
No, American Apparel does what is called "street casting." They use non-professional models. They're usually girls they think are "cool" in some way like their personality or personal style. They don't fit into the physical model parameters and they might have other jobs like graphic designer, ballerina etc.
That explains why they mostly photograph so short... Thank you for the information!

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21-05-2013
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i think they also use store employees sometimes. How about AF those other similar lines liek American Eagle

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21-05-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Stylin View Post
i think they also use store employees sometimes. How about AF those other similar lines liek American Eagle
American Eagle uses real, new face/upcoming models from markets like LA, Miami, Chicago and sometimes book out of NYC (especially for the bigger campaigns).
AF, Hollister, they also use real professional models. Sometimes they are the same models that work at the stores in NYC albeit they're also agency repped (I've seen some big models come out of those stores. If you're ever there, it's a great place to go model spotting).

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23-05-2013
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I think Danijela Dimitrovska belongs here. Yes, she did some runway and scored Elle, Glamour and Grazia covers, but she mainly does catalogues. She is also somewhat famous in her homeland Serbia where she married a TV personality. Anyway, she is beautiful.


(german.fansshare.com)

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23-05-2013
  28
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How about the Brazillian girls that no longer do lots of high fashion work but still get regular gigs for brands like Nine West or Gap or even Loreal for some eg. Cintia Dicker, Fernanda Tavares etc

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28-05-2013
  29
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American Apparrel uses real models. They book out of LA and they use lesser known girls. Street casting doesn't really exist because you can't expect a random person to be able to take a good picture and pose. When any company/publication say they don't use model, they mean they don't use well known or fashion models. They get away with it by casting from talent agencies ie they list them as commercial print models, lifestyle models, or people models (depending on what country/market your in). However, American Apparel only books from top agencies like Next, Ford, Elite, etc. So they can be placed in here.

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28-05-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Stylin View Post
How about the Brazillian girls that no longer do lots of high fashion work but still get regular gigs for brands like Nine West or Gap or even Loreal for some eg. Cintia Dicker, Fernanda Tavares etc
your confusing commercial and catalog. From what I understand, I think what the original poster wanted was the E-commerce girls. They types of girls who are in-betweeners (ie did image and commercial work) but now mostly does catalog work only. Those women make their money from campaigns not by doing catalog work... so I don't think they apply. Unless, they are okay with this becoming a commercial thread. If not, I think we should start one.

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