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03-03-2008
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lilly shen
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Originally Posted by sethii View Post
Moving on... do you know who this is at Giorgio armani (and some other shows in milan) ?



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That's Lilly Shen from Elite

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03-03-2008
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In all Han has had the most shows totalling 50 and with some big names. The other asian models are like playing musical chairs some get a seat and some don't. Somehow I'm not a fan of Liu Wen she's pretty but boring and has a skinny body. Pei Bei has a big head and that's a turn off. Mo seems to have it all for the catwalks, face, body, presence, but she needs to work in europe or NY more to get the editorials and advertisements so she can get the big name shows like Han. Mo needs a reality show that follows her from China to Paris Milan NY, quickest way to get publicity is to have a reality show.

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03-03-2008
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Reason Du Juan is not in Paris shows is because she is on contract to shoot something therefore she's doing many London shows this season to compensate for leaving Paris earlier than anticipated. She has something special to shoot so you guys wait for it , its not editorial though sorry..
Source: her booker at IMG.

Its not a big huge contract something but the dates unfortunately coincided with paris fashion week. This is all I can say at the moment .
info

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08-03-2008
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Me thinks that this implosion of Chinese models is the "Du Juan Effect." Girls are taking risks at western markets, that wasn't always the easiest to do. Especially for Chinese models the vision of China has risen to be a financial, technical, biomedicine juggernaut superpower. The value western people place to hire someone determines your worthiness, and is based on the reality China is a superpower. In the past designers used Chinese models because they're cheap, and China was a backward country but now they have to pay chinese models rates the other top models get, because it's a superpower.

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08-03-2008
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Well we don't know how much the chinese models were paid...so can't draw conclusions. Anyway I doubt the status of a country affects how much a model is paid. Plenty of american models are paid in clothes or not at all.

BTW, discussion of politics is not allowed on tFS so let's not debate here how fabulous china is...or not.

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10-03-2008
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I love this little article written in 1998 about Chinese Models making it big in China and abroad. A lot of Chinese models have tested europe and the NY with limited success until Du Juan. It has been verified Du Juan does get paid the top dollar rates, $10K and up for catalog, and catwalk around that range as well. Remember that Du Juan speeded into our consciousness as the modern chinese model of a modern china. Read this little article below, about model Zhang Xiaoqing who is stunning, 180cm tall, causes stares as she walks down the streets, and dreams to make it big in modeling. Western companies had used Chinese TOP models because they were cheap at $1200 for a show or photo shoot. I doubt Du Juan or Han or Hye gets less $10,000 for paid shows.

http://www-cgi.cnn.com/ASIANOW/asiaw...123/feat2.html

CHINA'S MODEL WORKERS




By Steven Schwankert / Beijing ZHEN JUN HAD GREAT looks and lots of ambition. What she needed was a break. It came last year when she was eating with friends in a Beijing restaurant. At a nearby table were Cheng Jing, who runs a modeling agency, and one of his top girls, Huan Lulu. Cheng was so struck by the woman across the room that he asked Huan to go over and introduce herself. "She was very lucky," says Huan. "Before dinner was over, she was talking with us.'' And before Zhen had left the restaurant, she had decided to join Cheng and his stable of about 40 models. As designer fashion spreads into and across China, an infant industry is springing up to supply it with tall, striking women like Zhen and Huan. The work offers mote (a transliteration of model) a shot at money and fame. But forget comparisons with the West. With few local fashion labels and not many professional photographers, there is little chance just yet for China's models to be anything more than catwalk strutters. Still, it's a lot better than spending your life sewing labels on jeans.

Zhen and Huan won't reveal how much they earn ("Each job is different," they insist) but there is no limit to their ambition. Zhen, 19 years old and 1.8 meters (5 ft 9 in) tall, has the lush, pouting lips that Westerners admire but Chinese shun. It's a typical model's face -- memorable, but not necessarily beautiful. Huan is closer to a standard Chinese definition of pretty, with thin, curving eyebrows that contribute to her haughty air. She is two years younger than Zhen, also 1.8 meters tall and 103% attitude.

Both bubble with confidence about their futures in the business, but are still hedging their bets. Huan is taking a work-study program at a major Beijing hotel. With the classroom phase completed, she says she is completing her training by working -- without pay -- in the food and beverage department. (She is a hostess in the hotel's Indonesian restaurant.) Zhen is studying management at Beijing Industrial College.

For most Chinese girls, the path to the catwalk begins in a modeling competition. "The industry is new,'' says Cheng. "Competitions increase interest. It's our equivalent of the beauty pageants held abroad. Those aren't very palatable in China.'' As he speaks, Cheng works the phones in his office-cum-apartment on Beijing's Third Ring Road. He is dressed in foreign sportswear and glitters with jewelry: a pinkie ring, a gold watch and a gold neck chain. Photos of models are tacked and taped to his walls. A bookshelf in the corner is piled with fashion magazines, catalogs and programs from competitions. In a back room, models while away their time watching TV and videos.

The 34-year-old army veteran got the idea for his Cheng Jing Modeling Center when he attended the 1994 Beijing International Auto Exhibition. A representative of a Japanese carmaker asked in exasperation why Beijing didn't supply models for publicity work. Then a Japanese friend asked Cheng to line up some women for a promotion. "I hung around with a lot of women in those days, so people thought I might know some,'' he says, smiling at his playboy past.
There is still something of the ladies' man about Cheng, but he insists his business is completely above board. "No karaoke bars, nothing like that," he says. Some managers book their models into doing so-called fashion shows in clubs, where they mingle (and more) with customers. To Cheng, this is pimping, not managing. Says Zhen, already worldly about the dark side of the industry: "You have to look at each offer and then decide."

The Shanghai International Fashion Model Competition is a favorite with Chinese girls, mainly because it gives them a chance to measure themselves against their Western counterparts. "To be honest, the Chinese models can't yet compare to Western ones,'' says Cheng.

Still, they are a big hit in Hong Kong, where about a dozen appeared in last week's Hong Kong Fashion Week. Says Patrick Lam, who helps organize fashion shows for the local Trade Development Council: "Many mainland girls -- especially those from the north -- are of a high standard. They have lots of training, they're young, they're tall and they have good skin. They make good models."

Paul Lau Po-lo, general manager of Elite Hong Kong-China Model Management, agrees, but cautions: "They are well trained, but in a Chinese way. I like them to come and live in Hong Kong for a while because this is an international city. They have some habits that are not suitable internationally." He declines to elaborate.
Dong Lei and Jiang Zhengyu, both 19 and statuesque, apparently have no ambition to work in Hong Kong -- or anywhere else for that matter. The two students at Beijing Textile College are by-products of a system that sometimes seems to measure a girl's height but not her suitability. "We're not really hungry for success," they acknowledge. They enjoy the catwalk life, but lack the zeal that shines so brightly on the faces of Zhen and Huan. "If it doesn't work out, it won't really matter," says Dong. As China's fashion industry becomes more sophisticated and cut-throat, she, Jiang and many more will no doubt step aside with a smile and a thank-you.

Don't expect such meekness from Zhang Xiaoqing. Like Dong and Jiang, she studies design and performance (meaning modeling) at the Textile College. But she could hardly be more different. Standing 1.8 meters tall -- "exactly," as she likes to point out -- the 19-year-old is not breathtakingly beautiful, but her face lingers after she has gone. Even for a model, she dresses strikingly, sporting black woolen tights, ankle boots and a short black coat tied at the waist. Sitting in Beijing's Hard Rock Cafe, she nurses a glass of orange juice as if another sip will push her up one clothing size.

"I used to eat anything I wanted," she says. "But in those days I was studying to be a kindergarten teacher, running around all the time. Now I'm sitting at a desk all day, so it's completely different." Zhang has the kind of looks that cause gawking Beijing bicyclists to ride into each other. But she tries not to notice. "At first, the attention made me proud," she says. "Then, I thought it was weird. Lately, it just makes me angry. There's no need for the staring."
The Hard Rock is not normally part of Zhang's life. As a student, she is up at seven in the morning, then in class from eight until midday, five days a week. Evenings are spent working on design projects or hanging out with her roommates. Zhang shares a three-by-five square meter dormitory with six others -- hardly the lifestyle of someone in training for one of the most style-conscious jobs in the world. She doesn't mind. "Being a student's cool," she says. "And I'm learning design as well as modeling."

Zhang won a modeling competition in Dalian last year. Now she has her sights set on a breakthrough in Beijing. After that, who knows? But entering a competition is tough without a manager or sponsor. "You need photos,'' she says. "It's just not possible for me to find photographers and do everything else all by myself.'' That might put an end to her ambition to compete in this year's Shanghai competition. Agency manager Cheng says Zhang and the hundreds of other hopefuls would benefit from the industry being better structured. "What we need is a modeling association or union," he says. "It would protect everyone. It would regulate the business. It would standardize rates."

It might also help raise the profile of Chinese models internationally. "Foreign companies use Chinese models because they're inexpensive," says Linda Hsieh, whose work in assisting promising models to study English abroad has given her an inside look at the industry. "Even a top model like Chen Juanhong gets only 10,000 yuan [about $1,200] for a show or photo shoot," says Hsieh. Naomi Campbell wouldn't put on her eyeliner for that.

For Zhang, it's back to reality. She walks out of the Hard Rock and, passing up expensive taxis, heads for a bus stop. As she goes by, people turn for a second and third look. She ignores them. At the bus stop, the photos advertising most products are still of foreign women and men. One day, if she's lucky, that will be her face on those billboards.
With reporting by Alexandra A. Seno / Hong Kong

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10-03-2008
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Those girls are no name though. All no names get paid pretty much nothing regardless of where you are from. Hye, Du, or Han won't take poor pay simply because they're established enough to earn more. Like sethii said, an American or Canadian model is still going to get paid poorly. New models get paid in clothes, and ALL models get paid $250 for an editorial max, even girls like Du. You simply cannot compare that girl and Naomi Campbell..

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10-03-2008
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I wasn't comparing the models back then to their counterparts, it's more how long Chinese models have come to presently working the shows in 2008. Now a model like Du Juan can be paid comparably, due to better agency representation. Although now there is quota system limiting who gets into what shows.

I'm watching a violent japan joshi female wrestling match with vicious headbutts and I'm heading out.


Last edited by angel222; 10-03-2008 at 03:50 AM.
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10-03-2008
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There are so many beautiful Chinese models working in Shanghai including one from this catwalk video. This was from the late 90s to 2000, the model in the black paintsuit puts Mo Wandan's catwalk skills to shame.

"www.youtube.com/watch?v=GenJfakdRLE"


Last edited by angel222; 10-03-2008 at 03:47 PM.
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11-03-2008
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China Special Training Ground for Fashion Models
http://youtube.com/watch?v=wYfGSqn2N7A

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12-03-2008
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^ i have little idea what was going on there but is was very disturbing and horrid. Is it the thing that dai xiaoyi participated in? Are you sure they were models? Is the army training some elite assassin models? Sounds like zoolander.

Anyway...I'll change the thread title to 'Chinese Models'

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12-03-2008
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Liu Dan on the cover of Trace magazine (a couple of pics inside too)
http://www.trace212.com/pdf/TRACE_80.pdf

Not many chinese models in editorial/campaign/cover recently...

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Last edited by sethii; 12-03-2008 at 09:51 AM.
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12-03-2008
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Shan Jingya reminds me of Daul Kim.
Pei Bei has done really well this season.

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17-03-2008
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Liu Wen, ph. by Zhang Yue








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18-03-2008
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Chinese models tend to have the most athletic editorials.

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