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17-04-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by writergal28
I like the 16 rule, but I'd prefer 18. In North America, you're usually finished high school by then, so you won't have to worry about studying or getting a GED. Anyone younger CAN model, but they should stick to juniors and other things that cater to the teen set. In other words, it's perfectly fine for a 15 year old to model for Seventeen, but she shouldn't be in Vogue.
^^ My thoughts exactly.

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17-04-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by writergal28
I like the 16 rule, but I'd prefer 18. In North America, you're usually finished high school by then, so you won't have to worry about studying or getting a GED. Anyone younger CAN model, but they should stick to juniors and other things that cater to the teen set. In other words, it's perfectly fine for a 15 year old to model for Seventeen, but she shouldn't be in Vogue.
But if the whole point is for the model to be done their high school education by 18, how would modelling for younger things such as Seventeen make much difference? Through looking through US Vogue, or other international magazines, there is hardly a time where you will find a 15 year old doing topless and nude shots. The photographers know how old these girls are and I rarely ever come across elusive or shots baring young girls exposed.

To me, seeing it this way, when a model is not done school, even if they are doing work for magazines such as Seventeen, they are still going to be out of school and missing assignments. They will still need to go out and miss school for castings and shoots. By 16, many teenagers are mature enough to make their own decisions when thinking of what they will or will not do. The way I see it, if the modelling world isnt going to expose them to the "bad" things, they are still going to see it and become familiar with it through friends and people they meet in high school. Its just the environment in to which they are exposed to that is different.


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18-04-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yourbestfriend
But if the whole point is for the model to be done their high school education by 18, how would modelling for younger things such as Seventeen make much difference? Through looking through US Vogue, or other international magazines, there is hardly a time where you will find a 15 year old doing topless and nude shots. The photographers know how old these girls are and I rarely ever come across elusive or shots baring young girls exposed.

To me, seeing it this way, when a model is not done school, even if they are doing work for magazines such as Seventeen, they are still going to be out of school and missing assignments. They will still need to go out and miss school for castings and shoots. By 16, many teenagers are mature enough to make their own decisions when thinking of what they will or will not do. The way I see it, if the modelling world isnt going to expose them to the "bad" things, they are still going to see it and become familiar with it through friends and people they meet in high school. Its just the environment in to which they are exposed to that is different.

You can't honestly tell me that modeling for Seventeen is the same as doing the catwalk (which is what this was originally about) the catwalk is completely different than doing a young girl's magazine.

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18-04-2006
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I think 13 and up is fine for legitimate fashion/runway.

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18-04-2006
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Another point that hasn't been addressed is the self esteem issue. Say you take a beautiful young 14 year old. You promise her the moon....big things start happening for her and for a period of a year or two she does the best catwalk,beautiful editorials and even lands a campign or two. Then bingo...the next big thing shows up,you get shoved to the back pages and pretty soon you're yesterdays news. What do you think that sort of experience does to a young girls sense of self worth? She starts to wonder "What? I'm not pretty anymore?" "They don't like me now?" "I've spent the past few years neglecting my education,blown most of the money I've made because I thought it was endless....now what do I do?" This is the story of what happens to 85% of models who get a big break and thats not even counting the ones that stick around who never even got that chance.
Take a look at the back pages of this thread and you will see that I speak the truth. It takes a strong young lady/man to be able to handle that sort of rejection at such a young age.

Stay in school...take a year off before college if you have to give it a chance but don't count on it as a ticket to stardom.

and to all you models out there that made it big and are still on top....my hat is off to you.:p

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Last edited by model_mom; 18-04-2006 at 09:25 PM.
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18-04-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxOceanEyesxx
You can't honestly tell me that modeling for Seventeen is the same as doing the catwalk (which is what this was originally about) the catwalk is completely different than doing a young girl's magazine.
But then again, how can we say modelling for Seventeen is so innocent? There are still going to be perved photographers and harsh clients. Girls with eating problems as well as girls with drug problems will still co-exist with these girls. They will still be in New York with other teenage girls and run into similar problems.

I know what you mean in terms of runway though, and understand but the two co-incide with eachother. If you are to be on the runway you need to be in the magazines. But if you are modelling for Seventeen, you will almost likely never be on the runway, at most you will be in a Delia's catalogue.

I was just originally replying to the person who said it's fine for a girl to be in Seventeen not Vogue.

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18-04-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by model_mom
Another point that hasn't been addressed is the self esteem issue. Say you take a beautiful thin young 14 year old. You promise her the moon....big things start happening for her and for a period of a year or two she does the best catwalk,beautiful editorials and even lands a campign or two. Then bingo...the next big thing shows up,you get shoved to the back pages and pretty soon your yesterdays news. What do you think that sort of expierence does to a young girls sense of self worth? She starts to wonder "What I'm not pretty anymore?" "They don't like me now?" "I've spent the past few years neglecting my education,blown most of the money I've made because I thought it was endless....now what do I do?" This is the story of what happens to 85% of models who get a big break and thats not even counting the ones that stick around who never even got that chance.
Take a look at the back pages of this thread and you will see that I speak the truth. It takes a strong young lady/man to be able to handle that sort of rejection at such a young age.

Stay in school...take a year off before college if you have to give it a chance but don't count on it as a ticket to stardom.

and to all you models out there that made it big and are still on top....my hat is off to you.:p
This is why its important to have a good family base , or at least someone watching over you to help guide you away from spending all your hard earned money away too quickly. Wise investments can take a little bit of money a long way

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24-05-2006
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any body under the age of 17

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24-05-2006
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i'd say 13 is way too young.. if i think myself in that age, i would have not been prepared to anything like fashionworld. my life was surrounded by barbies :p i could have not travelled without my mom or even survived alone in the harsh modelling world. it is too cruel for young girls. i would say 17+ is a good age to enter to the modellingbusiness

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20-08-2006
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Part 1 The Age.co.uk.

Little women

August 19, 2006
Page 1 of 2 |

Younger, thinner, more baby-faced every year - the future of fashion's archetype seems inevitable, writes Janice Breen Burns.
Another decade in Frockland and by rights and all things logical, Kate Moss will be a Botoxed, liposucked has-been in rehab, Naomi Campbell should be banged up for a fair stretch on GBH, Megan Gale will be barefoot and pregnant with multo multo bambini, and the world's most gorgeous supermodel will be - I'm guessing - about eight.
Years old, that is.
And, um, yes, joking. Sort of. But such is the domino nature of history that, had France not moved to legislate against the use of models younger than 16 and countries including Australia not developed a kind-of not-really approach to self-regulation against using models under 13, then the preposterous could become the inevitable. Easy-peasey.
Those heart-pumpingly pretty, tall-as-a-building, breast-less, hip-less 13 and 14-year-old fashion icons of today could logically metamorphose into a generation of lanky, bird-boned eight-year-old supermodels tomorrow. By 2016, we'd be accustomed enough to womanhood being idealised by pre-pubescent girls not to bat an eyelid anyway.
The future does appear written already on the runways of the west. They bristle with teens "discovered" at 13, stomping along international catwalks by 14 and bona fide supermodels by 15, who increasingly resemble slightly older, negligibly bigger versions of the mythical Girl Child.
Younger, thinner, flatter, bonier, more baby-faced every year. And, a squizz at one Miss Liu Duo, China's entrant in the Miss World pageant when it's telecast from Poland next month, should also confirm for anyone who doubts it, that the global wave of love for elongated children has also broken there.
Everybody loves a little girl. It's perfectly understandable. They are cheerful and peachy sweet with swimming pool eyes and soft cupid lips. They're full of promise and blind faith and by about the age of eight when their little bubby-tummies shrink and their limbs and button-noses lengthen, they are, hands-down, the consummate clothes-models. The freshest, prettiest fantasy fashion archetypes (if a tad short). None of those inconvenient, bumpy bits the Lagerfelds and Pradas of the world avoid in their models because they can ruin the line of a nice frock. None of those pinging, fly-in-a-bottle hormones to mess up the dreamy-eyed persona of compliant innocence. (Of course, they would have to retire by age 10 - that's a given.)

In fact, there's only that icky socio/political palaver about fashion's "sexualisation of children", to jeopardise a real future eight year old's supermodelling career when you think about it. And, what's that all about anyway? The primeval childish impulse to dress "grown up" is really all about S-E-X? As any eight year old would squeal to set such ick-meisters straight: "E-yeeew!"
Idolising little girls as the perfect fashion racks - provided all that icky stuff is kept well out of the equation - might not be such a bad future. It would point up, plain and simple, that fashion's idols and archetypes are just that: inspirational not prescriptive, ideas not blueprints meant to be replicated by mere mortals.
As fashion is now, its teen queens and supermodels present an ideal that appears perfectly reasonable and achievable to the 94.7 per cent of women born normal. With some paint and pricey frocks, a touch of liposucking and Botox, an eating disorder perhaps, manic exercise regimen, and regular cosmetic surgical updates, we are convinced we can achieve and maintain a reasonably close approximation of our idols' perfection.
Now, if our idols' average age were eight, the game would be up before it started. Wouldn't it? We just wouldn't bother.

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Last edited by model_mom; 20-08-2006 at 03:02 PM.
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20-08-2006
  161
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It sets a very bad examples. Also pedophilia comes into play. Who wants to see a 12 year old (looking) girl in sexy clothes?
JonBenet proved how dangerous it is to dress children like that and put them on the stage. I dont think anyone under 17 belongs on a runway. Period.
Women can much rather intentify with models that look their age or are in their 20's than 12 year old girls wearing clothes for grown ups. Who is gonna buy that ? Stefanie was completely right - its girls our age that buy clothes, not girls under 16.

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20-08-2006
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http://www.thefashionspot.com/forums...?highlight=age

maybe a merge?

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20-08-2006
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If it were up to me I wouldn't hire a girl under 18. This industry is too harsh.

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20-08-2006
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People are saying it's better to be young because of measurements etc but that's exactly why it's a bad idea. It will imprint the idea in her head that what size she is at that age is ideal. A truly great model becomes more beautiful as she approaches mid 20s-30.


Last edited by Atelier; 20-08-2006 at 08:00 PM. Reason: Please see tFS Guidelines
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20-08-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by model_mom
Merged.

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