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15-06-2007
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^^ I guess the thing is that the older the girls are (sometimes), they more mature emotionally they are. The more the can handle dealing with modelling since it's not actually an easy career.

I would say about 17, proper age... but if the models' family has difficult circumstances and really desperately needs to get a job then--that's not really up to me.

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07-07-2007
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Catwalk ban for under-16 models
This is an age issue so I hope it's okay to post. If it should be moved, please do, and accept my apologies!

Quote:
Age crackdown on fashion industry aims to end 'size zero' crisis

Girls under the age of 16 will be banned from catwalks and photoshoots under new fashion industry rules drawn up to defuse the controversy over ultra-thin models.

The new age limit will mean that teenagers hoping to follow in the footsteps of Kate Moss, Lily Cole and Naomi Campbell, who all began modelling at 14 or 15, will no longer be used to sell clothes.

However, fashion bosses have decided not to ban 'size zero' models, who have sparked accusations that those, particularly the young, who seek to emulate them end up with eating disorders.

The new guidelines will come as part of the independent report into the 'size zero' crisis. The inquiry, under Labour peer Baroness Kingsmill, follows the death last year of two South American models working on the international circuit, one from anorexia and the other from malnutrition.
Kingsmill's Model Health Inquiry will release an interim report on Wednesday which also recommends better health and nutritional advice for models, improving ways in which they can complain about their working conditions and education for models' agents about eating disorders. The British Fashion Council, the industry's trade body which commissioned the inquiry, has indicated that it will accept and implement the recommendations.

Industry representatives welcomed the moves. Gavin Myall, managing director of top London agency ICM Models, said: 'I have been quite vocal on the fact that we would like it to be 16 or above. We do have models below that age but very few, and whenever they are on jobs they are accompanied by parents and do not do shows.'

Myall also agreed with the inquiry's refusal to propose a ban on 'size zero' models, who are the equivalent of a UK size four. 'I do not think putting a limit on size is the answer. Saying someone cannot work because they are not a certain size is not right, but no reputable London agency looks after size zero models.'

Susan Ringwood, chief executive of the eating disorders campaign group Beat, added: 'Banning size zero models isn't the whole answer. The taller, younger and skinnier that someone is at the same time, that is a risk to health. But you can also be very slender and very healthy. You can't tell if someone is unhealthy just by looking at them.'

But the industry needed to use more models whose size is closer to that of British women - whose average size is 16 - said Ringwood. 'The fashion industry needs to widen its definition of beauty and embrace a more diverse aesthetic in the way that Dove and John Lewis have by using more normal-sized women, which is healthy.'

She endorsed any ban on under-16 models 'because using young girls to sell women's clothes is distasteful'.

'Using the slender bodies of 14- and 15-year-old girls, who don't have adult curves and shapes, means clothes hang beautifully on them but that's unhealthy because it creates a chasm between the way we are in our bodies and the aspiration that that sets up. It makes people think they are buying the youth of the model as well as the clothes themselves,' said Ringwood.

The Model Health Inquiry's members include fashion designers Betty Jackson and Giles Deacon, supermodel Erin O'Connor, Storm Models boss Sarah Doukas and consultant psychiatrist Dr Adrienne Key. They have spent the past six weeks holding discussions with models, designers, magazine editors, photographers and models' agent about the problem and remedial action.

Models have demanded the industry introduces a standard contract of employment to prevent exploitation by unscrupulous agents through, for example, excessive working hours.

Hilary Riva, the BFC's chief executive would only say: 'The British Fashion Council commissioned the independent Model Health Inquiry to look into the health issues of models on London's catwalks and looks forward to receiving the interim report on Wednesday.'

The facts about thin

· 'Size zero' models became the subject of international debate when organisers of Madrid Fashion Week banned models with a body mass index below 18 last year.

· The deaths of models Luisel Ramos and Ana Carolina Reston from South America have been attributed to the size-zero trend.

· Although Milan and Madrid prohibited size zero models from their catwalks, London did not adopt the same policy last year.

· The European Union's move is expected to halt the trend of girls trying to copy size zero fashion models. Traditional dress sizes may be replaced with bust and waist measurements.
guardian.co.uk . Published 8 July 8 2007

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Last edited by SomethingElse; 07-07-2007 at 08:53 PM.
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07-07-2007
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It'll be interesting to see how that affects the state of fashion. London, from my observations, is where girls will go for a couple of seasons and where younger girls will get experience because London isn't on the same level as Milan or Paris (sad but true because I prefer London fashion). However I've noticed that it is only for London.

I'll keep my opinions on the Dove ads to myself though

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09-07-2007
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^I guess the younger girls could still get experience modeling for teen-oriented labels and magazines. That's not banned too is it?

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09-07-2007
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^ Or simply just fly to another country.

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13-10-2007
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Since age is such an issue, how come no one can agree on what the actual visual differences are between one age and another? I don't see how people can be so discriminatory about age when there for the most part there simply isn't significant difference between them when it comes to looks. So what's the point of judging on actual age when selecting a model?

Many 13 year olds stay looking like 13 year olds until they're in their mid-20's or longer. Look at Asians, for example. I've never met one Asian that looks their real age in my life! Some people look 20 from the day they turn 13 and always look older than they really are.

I don't see how age can be such a big deal when there is no consistency on the look of a certain age group from one person to the next. Visible signs of aging vary so greatly from one person to another, from one race to the next. So why must those in fashion be so fussy over this issue when there's really no criteria or consensus on what makes a person look 13 versus 18 --since 13 can look like 18, and 18 can look like 13? LOL

The only field i've ever seen a criteria for aging is in the field of dermatology, where they can sometimes judge age based on the change of the skin per decade. Sometimes. Even that is subject to error since sun damage tends to appear every 10 years, and those that didn't accumulate the damage won't show the visible signs of change.

I hope the age discrimination gets eliminated in modeling altogether because it's so silly and baseless.

This is very silly:

"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agyness_Deyn
Controversy

Despite in interviews claiming to be 21 years of age, Deyn is actually 24. Her listing on the Companies House website, under the name Laura Hollins, shows her birthday as February 16, 1983, not as February 16, 1986, as she, her associates and internet databases claim. Throughout 2007, Deyn's mother, Lorraine, has been questioned in various publications and tabloids about her daughters age, but in response has said that she has been advised not to comment on the issue, further raising suspicions."



Why is a mere gap of a couple years such a problem? LOL


Last edited by o0ceania; 13-10-2007 at 05:33 AM.
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28-02-2008
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^alright!?..

i don't even think it is okay when models starting there career at the age of 13!!! where is their childhood?? in their life later i think they gonna regret their decision..maybe?
so i dont like seeing models being sooo young.. -.-

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28-02-2008
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I think we have seen some girls start modeling early, have success and then get right out. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120415888096598181.html

Right now fashion wants the bodies of 6' tall 14 yr olds. I don't think 14 yr olds can really enjoy all the pressure. By the time they are 17 and a perfect age to enjoy the excitement, their career is over. They have more developed bodies, they are no longer new faces, and their career is over. A new crop of 14-yr-olds is in the wings.

They may have sacrificed high school for that. They may have never made the big score $$$-wise.

Better to wait and see if you are still naturally slim enough at 17. And accept you probably won't be (although it could change).

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28-02-2008
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Personally I think 14 is the right age to start a runway career, I feel that at that age you mature more and are able to take care of yourself and make your own decisions.

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28-02-2008
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Sorry, at 14 the body is somewhat mature, but the mind, no.

But write that on a piece of paper, seal it in an envelope and then read it when your daughter turns 14. Everyone can use a laugh.

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28-02-2008
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Not every teenager is the same, I know of many people my own age who are responsible enough and strong enough to handle this industry even if that cannot be said for everyone. I suppose its really up to the parents to know whether there child is ready for this or not but if I was a parent I'd know not to stop her/him following something they'd want to do because these chances don't come often and might not be around when they're of adult age.

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28-02-2008
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It's not a very nice industry. It's asking too much of a 14 yr-old girl to face all the rejection that even a successful model gets. School is actually a much better bet. Especially now that girls need a career for their whole life, not just until the first kid at 21.

You just know that at 18 she will be blaming her parents, "Why did you let me quit school? Why didn't I have a normal teen life?" And the chances are, just like would-be pro athletes, there was no big contract.

At TFS we see the success stories, the huge proportion who fade are just forgotten.

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28-02-2008
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You can't really say that for everyone and that age a lot of people plan to leave school for more practical work. As with schoolwork its can be caught up on, kind of like when you're off sick for a week or so and catch up on the work you missed in your own free time. Also its not as if the model can't just leave the industry if it all gets too much. I just feel its up to the models parents and themselves, you can't tell her its not right when its her decision and only they know if they can do this or not.

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28-02-2008
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It is up to the parents. If you have lots of money and can afford to go along (and pay for yourself) you might want to risk it for a daughter who has exactly everything that is wanted.

Still, the parents better be aware of all the risks, on behalf of their daughter. And yes, they can tell her that it's not her decision. Just look at all the deluded teens on models.com who think they seriously have what it takes.

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28-02-2008
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i think 13-15 is too young

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