Racial Diversity In Modeling #3 - Page 3 - the Fashion Spot
 
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07-03-2015
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Originally Posted by miwa View Post
I hate this. It's so disingenuous. I remember Lanvin a couple of season ago had all the black models walk at the end together, and I thought it was ridiculous to say the least.
Alber said that he did that because he wanted to offset those last outfits from the rest of the collection because they were so different from it, I don't think he meant anything bad by it he just didn't realize it could be taken in a negative way.

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Originally Posted by squilliam View Post
Alber said that he did that because he wanted to offset those last outfits from the rest of the collection because they were so different from it, I don't think he meant anything bad by it he just didn't realize it could be taken in a negative way.
Why were all the models wearing those dresses black then? Was that coincidence as well? Lol, as if. Lanvin has never been a racially diverse show and it never will be.

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Why were all the models wearing those dresses black then? Was that coincidence as well? Lol, as if. Lanvin has never been a racially diverse show and it never will be.
I guess it would be kind of difficult to find that many black models so he just used white models for most of the show? I don't know really, but I do recall reading an article where he said that he did it to make those dresses stand out. I do think he did discover a certain black model, so I suppose he doesn't have much against them. White people don't always realize they're doing something offensive because usually they haven't had to deal with that kind of prejudice. I'm white (I'm middle eastern but look Russian), I don't know what black or Asian or most minorities have gone through because I haven't gone through it most of it myself. I doubt Alber realized he was doing something potentially offensive

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Im glad so many darker skin black models are being recognized in Paris. I just hope this isn't just the trend for the season.

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^Yeah, hopefully they're not just a seasonal trend. Great to see dark skin black models opening major shows (Balenciaga and Hermes).

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Originally Posted by TREVOFASHIONISTO View Post
Im glad so many darker skin black models are being recognized in Paris. I just hope this isn't just the trend for the season.
I also loved seeing black models rocking natural hair (especially Maria Borges at Givenchy and the closer at Celine).

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While I'm happy that Wang & co. upped the diversity at Balenciaga, I can't deny that I too felt a disingenuous vibe.

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Yeah, it all seems shady to me. And looking back to NY, Marc Jacobs was terrible too. He only had 4 black models and they were grouped together.

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^Can't understand why they have to be grouped together. It's so silly.

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from a Dazed & Confused article
Quote:
This legendary model agent thinks diversity isn't improving

Premier founder (and Malaika Firth's agent) Carole White explains why black girls are still a rare occurrence on the runway

It feels like runway diversity has been on the fashion agenda for years. But every season, we see the same number of black models in fashion shows, and Vogue Italia's groundbreaking black-models-only issue in 2008 feels a very long way away. In an interview with Dazed, model agent and Premier agency founder Carole White says that the problem hasn't improved, either.

"I don’t think diversity has got much better over the years," she says. "You can get a white girl going in maybe a month, two months, a black girl it can take six to twelve."

So why do black models' careers take longer to get going? "It’s much more difficult to get a test photographer to shoot them, probably because they don’t know how to light their skin, maybe the make-up artist has never been taught how to get the make-up right," White explains. "Until the girl has a cult following it’s hard work, very, very hard work for her and for us."

It's a problem that doesn't just afflict black models. In a feature on the aesthetic politics of filming black skin, Washington Post movie critic Ann Hornady writes that black actors face the exact same challenge: white filmmakers just didn't know how to light black skin. In some cases, the technology itself wasn't even sensitive enough to capture the full variety of darker skin tones.

But there are some happy endings to this sorry tale, too. Models like Malaika Firth, Jourdan Dunn and Winnie Harlow are breaking down barriers with their work; in 2013, Firth became the first black model to land a Prada campaign since Naomi Campbell in 1994, while Dunn is now one of the most highly-paid models in the industry. Dazed 100 star Harlow, who has vitiligo, is one more black model shaking up beauty conventions in a white-dominated industry.

"When Malaika got the Prada campaign, that was an amazing moment," White says. "We got her thanks to the programme [Premier documentary The Model Agency]. Her mum and her were watching it, and they rang me the morning after the first one aired and I said yeah, bring her in! She’s the cutest little thing, we are really proud."

Read our full interview with Carole White here.
dazeddigital.com

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Sounds like a cop-out. However, it does show that diversity is needed in all areas of the industry, if make-up artists, hair stylists, photographers are going to claim that they don't know how to work with darker skin tones or hair that isn't naturally straight and presumably aren't willing to learn.

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That is comical at best. Institutionalized racism is the answer. Save me the "Oh we don't know how to light your skin" mess and let's call a spade a spade.

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I just laughed out loud at that. Really? It's 2015 and these supposedly "renowned" photographers don't know how to do something as simple as adjust lighting?

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11-03-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orchidee View Post
I just laughed out loud at that. Really? It's 2015 and these supposedly "renowned" photographers don't know how to do something as simple as adjust lighting?
Same here. It's pure bullshit. You don't even need to be a very talented photographer to be able to adjust lighting.

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I can sorta understand the hair thing, but the rest sounds incredibly stupid. I'm sure pat McGrath, who does so make up for so many of the shows, knows how to do make up for dark skin. As for the photographers, they don't seem to have a problem lighting dark objects or clothes or animals or rooms, so I don't buy that whole "we don't know how to light dark skin".
If someone is already an expert it seems like expanding their skill set would not be difficult. As for the technology not being good enough, it's become very good now and images can easily be captured and perfected, so that excuse won't work either.


Last edited by squilliam; 11-03-2015 at 04:48 PM.
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