Racial Diversity In Modeling #3 - Page 5 - the Fashion Spot
 
How to Join
19-03-2015
  61
front row
 
jj36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Gender: homme
Posts: 472
Quote:
Originally Posted by fashionlover2001 View Post

But can we also focus on VOGUE PARIS.
NO Covers of models of colour since Emmanuelle Alt took over as Editor-in-chief of Vogue Paris since February 2011. NOT ONE!

I'm very disturbed.

Does she not like women of Colour?

Could it be something else? What's going on?

Anna Ewer
Natasha Poly
Daria
Kate
Lara
All these models have had several covers already, yet no Top model of colour have!
Why does this disturb you? Its not as if Carine was a champion of diversity with her cover choices? The only black models on the cover were Naomi/Rose/Georgina Robertson (was that her name?). Did she every put any other Asian models besides Du Juan on the cover?

Either Carine/Emmanuelle are racist or models of color don't sell well as cover models. I'm guessing its the latter. Which sucks.

  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  62
fashion elite
 
fashionlover2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: NYC
Gender: homme
Posts: 2,595
There's a heated debated about Diversity or Lack-thereof at this moment!

Why shouldn't I be disturbed?

Should I/We just accept and pretend this is how things should be?

Even Vogue UK just featured Jourdan.

  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  63
backstage pass
 
orchidee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: USA
Gender: homme
Posts: 849
The reasoning that covers with models of color don't sell well is absolute crap. And I highly doubt that putting a black or Asian model on the cover of Vogue Paris would send their sales in a downward spiral--especially when their covers and issues as a whole are boring enough as it is. So if they insist on doing boring covers, they might as well be boring covers with models of color on them.

And in the case of Alt, it's not just with the covers. Even the editorials are seriously lacking in terms of racial diversity.

The fact of the matter is that of the major Vogue editions, VP is doing the worst in terms of diversity. At least the others put black celebrities on their covers, which is something VP hasn't done in ages.

  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  64
V.I.P.
 
dsamg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Adelaide
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,316
Quote:
Originally Posted by jj36 View Post
Why does this disturb you? Its not as if Carine was a champion of diversity with her cover choices? The only black models on the cover were Naomi/Rose/Georgina Robertson (was that her name?). Did she every put any other Asian models besides Du Juan on the cover?

Either Carine/Emmanuelle are racist or models of color don't sell well as cover models. I'm guessing its the latter. Which sucks.
I don't know that It was that Carine didn't like models of colour, I just thought she didn't like anyone outside of her 5 favourite models..VP is not only the worst for racial diversity but for any actual diversity in general, as much as I love Lara/Kate/Daria etc it is boring never seeing anyone different.

Status: Online
 
Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  65
V.I.P.
 
dsamg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Adelaide
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,316
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightclubbing View Post
Really, girl?

Black Supermodel Malaika Firth Wants To 'Ignore' Fashion's Racism Problem

Malaika Firth is one of the few black models that have experienced soaring success in fashion -- an industry that is notorious for its lack of diversity. Therefore it's not far-fetched to believe that the 20-year-old, who became the first black model to land a Prada campaign in nearly 20 years, would understand her lofty position and work to improve the racially imbalanced situation.

Sadly, that's not the case. The Kenyan-born, London-raised beauty presented a few tone-deaf comments about racism in fashion during a recent interview with The Telegraph:


How does the saying go? Ignorance is bliss. Well, that seems to be the route that Firth is taking, despite the fact her contemporaries -- like Jourdan Dunn, Chanel Iman and Joan Smalls -- are using their supermodel status to speak out against the lack of diversity.

More at the source
I do understand her point and don't think it's that silly..unfortunately sometimes there is no benefit at all to speaking up and it doesn't change the opinions ingrained in the heads of bigots. Sometimes the most useful thing you can do is quietly succeed, show the world your race doesn't matter and you didn't have to say a single word about it. There was a big backlash in Australia to a very similar quote about feminism by a prominent politician:

Quote:
"Stop whingeing, get on with it and prove them all wrong," Bishop is quoted as saying. In what has already been latched upon as criticism of former Prime Minister Julia Gillard, Bishop is also said to exhort: "Please do not let it get to you and do not become a victim, because it's only a downward spiral once you've cast yourself as a victim."

For me I refuse to acknowledge [the glass ceiling]. I'm not saying it doesn't exist. But the approach I've taken is that if I want something I'll work hard and set my mind to it and if it comes off that's great. If it doesn't I'm not going to blame the fact I'm a woman. I'm not going to look at life through the prism of gender.
I guess that's kind of the same ideal and I'm not saying it is the right way to think about things but there is nothing wrong with it either,


Last edited by dsamg; 19-03-2015 at 07:55 AM.
Status: Online
 
Reply With Quote
 
19-03-2015
  66
V.I.P.
 
Benn98's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Bbbrrruummiiee
Gender: homme
Posts: 11,787
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsamg View Post
I don't know that It was that Carine didn't like models of colour, I just thought she didn't like anyone outside of her 5 favourite models..VP is not only the worst for racial diversity but for any actual diversity in general, as much as I love Lara/Kate/Daria etc it is boring never seeing anyone different.
Agree with you, the problem with Vogue Paris greater than ethnicity here. They tend to fixate on a select group of girls, but I dont think it's deliberately motivated by race.

Also agree with you re Malaika. She shouldn't have a responsibility to address the issue of race. Especially, if in her case, it doesn't really affect her directly. There's this tendency for society to blanket an entire race/group together. She's an individual, with her own viewpoints, however weird it may seem to others. Why should she be considered as a spokesperson or crusader against diversity just because she's black, or mixed, or whatever?

You've given a prime example with that feminism brouhaha.

  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  67
backstage pass
 
orchidee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: USA
Gender: homme
Posts: 849
I agree with you both on the Malaika "issue". Even though it is kind of unfortunate that a model of color who has managed to have success doesn't have anything to contribute to the conversation on racism, it's not fair to force her to have an opinion. Her experience as a black woman or mixed race woman is not the same as that of other black or mixed race people. So we can't expect her to have a strong opinion or even care about race issues.

  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  68
V.I.P.
 
valliaddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Gender: homme
Posts: 3,536
Quote:
Originally Posted by fashionlover2001 View Post
Just to point out Malaika Firth doesn't even considers herself Black. Which she isn't. She's of mixed race.
I really wish you would stop saying this. She may label herself as "mixed," but that doesn't mean she is exempt from the black discussion just because she's not "100% black". And to be fair, almost EVERYONE is mixed with something, so the constant labeling of someone's race is pointless. Malaika, Joan, Chanel & many others may be mixed with something, but they play just as big of a part in the discussion as any other "black" model.

ETA- I want to add that it is HER CHOICE whether she wants to participate in discussions about race or not, but her being "mixed" should not be a reason for people dismissing her. That's really what I'm trying to say.


Last edited by valliaddict; 19-03-2015 at 01:30 PM.
  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  69
fashion elite
 
fashionlover2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: NYC
Gender: homme
Posts: 2,595
Sorry I won't.
I like to call things like I see them.
They are all women of colour and have it hard in the industry. We can all agree to that!

But just for the record Malaika doesn't identify as Black. She is a mixed race woman end of story. So is Joan.


Can we focus on issue at hand? VOGUE PARIS?


Last edited by fashionlover2001; 19-03-2015 at 04:13 PM.
  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  70
V.I.P.
 
TREVOFASHIONISTO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: N.Y.C.
Gender: homme
Posts: 15,377
^regardless if she identifies herself as black or mixed, the fact is she is a woman of color. therefore making her a minority in this industry.

I dont get why it is such a big deal, she is black and she is also white. if she is identifying herself as mixed she is recognizing that she is more than one ethnicity...

  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  71
tfs star
 
saucer-like's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,938
Does Malaika believe that she wasn't working hard enough this season when she was basically replaced by Aya Jones? That it has nothing to do with the revolving door of black "it" models and that these issues don't affect her career? All models face the likelihood of a short shelf life, but MOC have fewer opportunities and support from the bigwigs to even get a chance at gaining a foothold. There's a way to address these kind of issues without sounding like you're burying your head in the sand.

Also, I wouldn't give celebrities too much credit hoping that they will take a stand when it comes to race and fashion. Most of them are desperate for validation and acceptance by the very same racist industry and are color-struck their damn selves. Talking about "transcending" race as if being black is something that one needs to overcome… many of them/their fans don't even recognize them as black but "mixed". At least I've heard enough about their claims to "exotic" heritage to know that I'm not interested in their thoughts about race issues. Of course, there is nothing wrong with identifying as being of mixed race, but it comes across as if they don't realize that the non-black groups in the industry and society will NEVER see them as anything but black. Never.

Having the power to be heard does not always go hand-in-hand with wanting to be heard or having something to say.

The likes of Beyonce and Rihanna get more covers and endorsements than most white models so it bothers them none to see white-dominated runways when they're sitting front row and will buy/wear the whole collection for their photo ops. Then there's someone like Kanye West who says the most deplorable things about race, women and everything in general. None of these people care about greater representation of black people in fashion because they are the representation of black people in fashion and they'll hold onto those positions for dear life. It helps their brands to be viewed as "fashion icons" and having "transcended" their race to be accepted. If there were a significant number of black models walking the runways, on the covers, scoring campaigns or black designers showing in NY or Paris then they wouldn't seem so special. Let alone other black celebrities getting that shine.

Frankly they should be more concerned that every other white B-list starlet gets the same number of prestigious covers all before she's inevitably nominated for an Oscar. Meanwhile they literally have to be crossover mega-stars continually churning out singles each year, never resting lest the spotlight moves elsewhere. Taking the notion of having to be "twice" as good to a new level… still in 2015.

  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  72
rising star
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Littleathquakes View Post
I've always said this, we need the celebrities to make waves, cause those are the ones people pay attention to.
^Is that really realistic, though? Saucer-like mentioned not 'giv[ing] celebrities too much credit hoping that they will take a stand when it comes to race and fashion', something I don't shame them for at all, actually. Why?

This past Oscars, for instance. From what I can tell, Prada (who we all know has a spotty record with diversity) only dressed black celebrities--Kerry Washington in Miu Miu, Common and Ava DuVernay in Prada.

Ava DuVernay? Who was close to an Oscar nom this past season and who was the first black woman to win the Sundance Best Director award was also commissioned by Miu Miu to create this short film, the first offer she got after winning Sundance. DuVernay proceeded to only cast black actresses in the film (I searched this website for the video and couldn't find it, but that's none of my business) And we all know about how Miu Miu also featured Lupita in a campaign a couple seasons ago and how Prada dressed her for the Oscars last year...

As someone who likes looking at the collections each season (but am also jaded re: race&fashion), I think there's something to be said for black actresses, especially using connections with fashion houses to build their profile. These women are artists, yes, but also have to survive in Hollywood.

And it's not like they have many opportunities to be seen as beautiful by wearing great clothes in films because they're largely invisible in that space. So the red carpet/mags are major for them (and even then, only Kerry, Lupita and Zoe are scoring covers, other black actresses are nonexistent).

Would it be nice for them to advocate? Yes, but I'd prefer that they advocate for changes within their own industry first.

I try to do my part (reconsidering purchases of perfumes/makeup produced by conglomerates) and it's been years since I've purchased anything at Victoria's Secret since they're content on changing their black models like hygienic people change underwear. Things look very bleak from where I'm standing but I think y'all already know that.

  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  73
tfs star
 
nightclubbing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NYC
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,541
Quote:
Originally Posted by saucer-like View Post
Does Malaika believe that she wasn't working hard enough this season when she was basically replaced by Aya Jones? That it has nothing to do with the revolving door of black "it" models and that these issues don't affect her career? All models face the likelihood of a short shelf life, but MOC have fewer opportunities and support from the bigwigs to even get a chance at gaining a foothold. There's a way to address these kind of issues without sounding like you're burying your head in the sand.
This exactly. And to say that young people ignore it when honestly, from my pov the discussions are being started by the younger generations made me wonder where her head is at.

Also the other models mentioned didn't wait until they were "big" to speak about the diversity issue in fashion, as far as I know that has been something that has constantly come up for as long as I can remember.

__________________
I'm from New York, I will kill to get what I need. ; tumblr
  Reply With Quote
19-03-2015
  74
V.I.P.
 
Littleathquakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: NJ
Gender: homme
Posts: 5,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by octoberchild View Post
^Is that really realistic, though? Saucer-like mentioned not 'giv[ing] celebrities too much credit hoping that they will take a stand when it comes to race and fashion', something I don't shame them for at all, actually. Why?

This past Oscars, for instance. From what I can tell, Prada (who we all know has a spotty record with diversity) only dressed black celebrities--Kerry Washington in Miu Miu, Common and Ava DuVernay in Prada.

Ava DuVernay? Who was close to an Oscar nom this past season and who was the first black woman to win the Sundance Best Director award was also commissioned by Miu Miu to create this short film, the first offer she got after winning Sundance. DuVernay proceeded to only cast black actresses in the film (I searched this website for the video and couldn't find it, but that's none of my business) And we all know about how Miu Miu also featured Lupita in a campaign a couple seasons ago and how Prada dressed her for the Oscars last year...

As someone who likes looking at the collections each season (but am also jaded re: race&fashion), I think there's something to be said for black actresses, especially using connections with fashion houses to build their profile. These women are artists, yes, but also have to survive in Hollywood.

And it's not like they have many opportunities to be seen as beautiful by wearing great clothes in films because they're largely invisible in that space. So the red carpet/mags are major for them (and even then, only Kerry, Lupita and Zoe are scoring covers, other black actresses are nonexistent).

Would it be nice for them to advocate? Yes, but I'd prefer that they advocate for changes within their own industry first.

I try to do my part (reconsidering purchases of perfumes/makeup produced by conglomerates) and it's been years since I've purchased anything at Victoria's Secret since they're content on changing their black models like hygienic people change underwear. Things look very bleak from where I'm standing but I think y'all already know that.

The power of celebrity is not an exact science. It depends on who the celebrity is, and what the cause is. Katy Perry for child abuse, as a fictitious example, doesn't resonate with me. I don't take her seriously as an artist. Replace her with someone like Cate Blanchett and I'm paying attention.


But fashion isn't as serious as that. I'm not saying racism within the industry isn't a serious issue, I'm speaking about fashion in general. So I think when celebrities speak out about the underhanded but ever-present racism in the industry, you have a better chance at connecting with audiences. Most people don't see the racism, they don't understand it, they don't know it even exists - this isn't an industry that regular day to day people pay attention to. If anything, it's something they would consider frivolous. You know that great scene in Devil Wears Prada where Miranda Priestley reads Alex about the blue sweater? Regular folks don't know the amount of work it takes. They just see fashion as a bunch of weird people making weird clothes on the runways. Maybe for people of color, we notice because the European girl or guy in the ad staring back at us isn't something we see in the mirror. But for the white people, it's not an issue. And it's not to say they don't care, but when you don't know any better, how would you know? You have to be told. Imagine if you're white, and you live in a white-majority area, you're not going to think twice if you see someone of your ethnic background in an advertisement.

  Reply With Quote
20-03-2015
  75
trendsetter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: California
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,361
Quote:
Originally Posted by saucer-like View Post
Does Malaika believe that she wasn't working hard enough this season when she was basically replaced by Aya Jones? That it has nothing to do with the revolving door of black "it" models and that these issues don't affect her career? All models face the likelihood of a short shelf life, but MOC have fewer opportunities and support from the bigwigs to even get a chance at gaining a foothold. There's a way to address these kind of issues without sounding like you're burying your head in the sand.

Also, I wouldn't give celebrities too much credit hoping that they will take a stand when it comes to race and fashion. Most of them are desperate for validation and acceptance by the very same racist industry and are color-struck their damn selves. Talking about "transcending" race as if being black is something that one needs to overcome… many of them/their fans don't even recognize them as black but "mixed". At least I've heard enough about their claims to "exotic" heritage to know that I'm not interested in their thoughts about race issues. Of course, there is nothing wrong with identifying as being of mixed race, but it comes across as if they don't realize that the non-black groups in the industry and society will NEVER see them as anything but black. Never.

Having the power to be heard does not always go hand-in-hand with wanting to be heard or having something to say.

The likes of Beyonce and Rihanna get more covers and endorsements than most white models so it bothers them none to see white-dominated runways when they're sitting front row and will buy/wear the whole collection for their photo ops. Then there's someone like Kanye West who says the most deplorable things about race, women and everything in general. None of these people care about greater representation of black people in fashion because they are the representation of black people in fashion and they'll hold onto those positions for dear life. It helps their brands to be viewed as "fashion icons" and having "transcended" their race to be accepted. If there were a significant number of black models walking the runways, on the covers, scoring campaigns or black designers showing in NY or Paris then they wouldn't seem so special. Let alone other black celebrities getting that shine.

Frankly they should be more concerned that every other white B-list starlet gets the same number of prestigious covers all before she's inevitably nominated for an Oscar. Meanwhile they literally have to be crossover mega-stars continually churning out singles each year, never resting lest the spotlight moves elsewhere. Taking the notion of having to be "twice" as good to a new level… still in 2015.
Well effin' said!

  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
#2, #3, diversity, modeling, racial
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:28 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2017 All rights reserved.