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12-11-2008
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anyone been to this place? they have a snazzy web page. its in the south end and they carry a lot of high end items (like balenciaga, prada etc) ive noticed theyve started advertising a lot in publications like the weekly dig...
http://armoireboston.com/

Neighborhood: South End
482 Columbus Ave
(between Newton St & Rutland Sq)
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 236-5838 www.armoireboston.com


Nearest Transit: Prudential (Green)
Massachusetts Ave (Orange)
Newton St (Silver

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21-12-2008
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Thanks. I come to Boston frequently, and I will have to check this out!

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21-12-2008
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another vintage store opened up between harvard square and porter square. this one is called "raspberry beret". its across the street from where "history" used to be...

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24-12-2008
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american apparel VINTAGE will be on newbury street. right by newbury comics.
i went in there today and they just had normal AA stuff, so i told them to SA "i was hoping this would be AA vintage.." he said that it would be in january, right now they just have AA's top sellers in there...

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19-01-2009
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poor little rich girl comes to newbury street!! (story from weekly dig)

There's a new store on Newbury Street. Walk in, and something's strange—all signs point to vintage, but there's no olfactory evidence of your grandmother's house; you see lingerie, but that appears to be an apron hanging unassumingly beside the lacy slips. A slew of be-feathered hats deck the walls, some almost comical in their 1960s testament to "more is more" ("I think a lot of these hats are meant for big hair," laughs employee Carrigan Denny-Brown), and some whose images will stick in your mind until you resign to go back and snatch them up.
It's poor little rich girl's (no pretentious capitals here) 1-month-old Newbury Street location. An expansion of her successful flagship consignment store in Davis Square, owner Meredith Byam fills the 550-square-foot space with hand-selected items, both vintage and new—and it's impossible to tell which is which. "We shop for trends, quality, rareness," explains Denny-Brown, Byam's right-hand "shopgirl."
PLRG augurs a new kind of boutique for the emerging cash-conscious clientele. "Even in a recession, girls still want new clothing," Byam says. "Even if it is just a $20 dress, it lifts their mood." She's not exaggerating. "I don't think there's anything in this room that's over $100, even the really nice hats," says Denny-Brown. "Because we don't consign, it's one of the reasons our prices can be so low." There's even an "under $30" rack, right next to the espresso-colored corkboard covered with expensive-looking (yet wallet-nuzzling) earrings. Byam explains, "My markup is low. I would rather make 10 shoppers happy—by selling a cute, trendy dress for $28—who will come back in a week or two to see what else is in, versus taking the gamble of selling the same dress for $80."
Byam and Denny-Brown zip from estate sales to private appointments with vintage dealers, keeping in mind that, as Denny-Brown says, even the most prestigious European dealers often get their supply "from Texas, which apparently just has warehouses of old stuff." It's this curious balance of selective nonpretension that's reflected in PLRG's collection: For every whimsical, feminine, Little Bo-Peep-ish skirt blanketed in yellow plastic flowers is its whimsical, feminine Betsey Johnson floral-print counterpart.
The shop, which cut in half the sprawling space of Sarni Dry Cleaners, specializes in no particular style−a pin exclaiming "Pick Pork" is displayed just feet away from an Audrey Hepburn-esque, silk black clutch with an understated gold and diamond embellishment. Yet oddly, a sense of cogency remains, maybe because it resembles your own closet—not everything goes together, but everything goes with you. (Maybe also because pillbox hats are basically Pavlovian cues to open your wallet.)
Spreading the good word "vintage" is another goal Byam and Denny-Brown shoot for. Scanning labels, you might find the classic "Corley's of Worcester" tag—Byam recalls, "I bought about 50 pieces from the family of a woman who won the lottery in the 60s, and she took the bus from outside Worcester to the city every day and bought clothing [that she never wore]. ... I think Corley's was her favorite shopping spot."
Despite the store's quiet opening, there are grand plans ahead. "We're going to double what you see right now," Denny-Brown explains, "fill it to the brim." In a month, the store will offer menswear, she says, and hopes of hosting art events, erecting elaborate window displays and working with more local artisans are all part of the vision. But for now, let's all take comfort in the fact that we don't have to win the lottery to buy an incredible Corley's double-breasted tweed coat.

[166 Newbury St., lower level, Boston. 617.425.4874. shoppoorlittlerichgirl.com]

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06-02-2009
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from daily candy

dame vintage opens in JP
There’s no stopping someone who’s got a good thing going.

Dany Pearson’s a good example. Her vintage styling skills were such a hit, she had to open her own shop, Dame, which carries vintage clothing in near-perfect condition.
Her fondness for 1940s-, ’50s-, and ’60s-era clothing is reflected throughout with silk dresses and blouses, luxurious leather purses, fur jackets, and high-waisted woolen skirts. Pick up classics from Dior and Versace, some of which Pearson refurbishes herself with modern details.
The unfinished floorboards, wire-framed mannequins, and sewing machine behind the counter seal the aesthetic of a put-together artists’ studio. And Pearson does her best to keep prices between $20 and $200.



So she’s really on a roll.

Dame, 68 South Street, Jamaica Plain (jpdame@gmail.com or jpdame.com).


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22-02-2009
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Second-hand store lines up expansion to Decelle's space

Luxury retailers may be suffering in the current economy, but business is good at Boomerangs, a Jamaica Plain second-hand clothing, furniture, and housewares store - so good that it will soon open a new location in West Roxbury.
The AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts, which owns and operates Boomerangs to raise money for its fight against AIDS, signed a letter of intent last month to lease space in the former Decelle’s building.
"We're serious" about the move, said Sue Kelley, the group's director of human resources. Decelle's, a former New England-based chain of clothing stores, closed in 2003 when it was bought out by Burlington Coat Factory, and Kelley hopes to fill the gap.
Kelley believes West Roxbury has both the customers and donors that Boomerangs needs.
"Since we're not buying inventory, we need to have sustainability," she said. "We need people to buy and people to donate [items] that people want to buy."
West Roxbury Main Streets director Joni Walter said the new store, at 1870 Centre St., has support from area business owners and residents.
"We're not going to replicate the JP store in West Roxbury," Kelley said, adding that the new branch would have more conventional window displays and would "carry less funky stuff, and be more geared toward young families.
"We'll draw from West Roxbury for the workforce, which will in turn give [the store] that kind of flavor."
While the JP store will remain, the AIDS Action Committee will close a small warehouse and move its donation-processing operations to the new location.
Kelley said she hopes to begin accepting donations at the new store in April and open for business May 1. (boston.com)

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04-03-2009
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Thrifty instincts run through her family

By Cindy Atoji Keene, Globe Correspondent | March 1, 2009
You'd never guess Rhonda Baker Michaud's husband makes more than $100,000 a year. After all, she admits to trash picking, and he wears shirts from the thrift store, as does their 17-month-old son.
But, says Michaud, it all makes for a better standard of living, as well as smart green thinking - reusing instead of sending things to the landfill. "I don't care if someone already wore something a few times; I'll just wash and bleach, dry, and put it on," says Michaud, who has seen discarded clothing with $300 price tags still attached.
Michaud is no amateur yard sale, flea market, and auction hunter; as co-owner of Sister Thrift in Watertown and Burlington, she's an expert in the resale field. While traditional retail shops are experiencing sales decline during the economic slowdown, Michaud says shoppers are still flowing through the doors - except now they're looking for suits and coats to wear for job interviews.
"One man's trash is another man's treasure," says Michaud. She and her sister, Tiffany LeBrun, spend their days sorting, pricing, and tagging "preowned" goods such as antiques, books, strollers, toys, purses, and shoes. "Our slogan is: 'If we don't get it, it doesn't exist.' "
The business is more for pleasure than profit. After paying rent, insurance, utilities, and keeping two trucks on the road, she says a typical thrift store owner can earn about $20,000 to $40,000. A portion of the store's profits benefits the MetroWest Humane Society.
The thrill of the hunt for bargains runs through Michaud's blood; she's been searching for that hard-to-find figurine or perfect side table since she was a child. She still has the collection of Steiff stuffed animals that she's been accumulating over the years.
"My grandfather ran a store called The Hodge Podge, and later sold things at the Jolly Jim Flea Market. My cousin John collected 'Occupied in Japan' figurines; my cousin Jerry loved military items such as uniforms and hats; and I did Steiff," says Michaud, who initially filled Sister Thrift with glassware and household items from her grandmother's basement.
"We didn't think we'd have enough inventory at first," says Michaud, "but now we're cluttered and crammed."
What's the most common item that people donate to your thrift store? We get tons of George Foreman grills; half of them are brand new, still in the box. They actually sell well, though. We also have a lot of clear vases. Clothing is also big, although we don't get a lot of men's clothing, probably because men will wear their clothes until they disintegrate, while women will buy more clothes and then say, 'This is old fashioned' and give it away. People also donate lots of children's clothing, more than we can use; we have to bag it and put it in overstock.
What kind of bargains can you find? Generally items will sell for 25 percent of what you would pay in the store, if they are in good condition. We don't put out things that are stained or yucky, broken or chipped, or dishes in sets of three. You can find brand names, such as Ann Taylor, J. Crew, Ralph Lauren Polo. We see it all, even Prada and Louis Vuitton purses. A shirt is $4.99, jeans are $6.99 - just to give you an idea of the prices.
Will people buy almost anything? I'll get a piece of junk into the store, and think 'No one will ever want this.' But we let the shoppers decide, and inevitably, it is the first thing that sells that day.
What is the cheapest and the most expensive item in your store? The cheapest is 49 cents, which includes vases, toys, and stuffed animals; the most expensive are handmade wool rugs, ranging in price from $600 to $1,200. That might seem like a lot of money, but the original cost is thousands of dollars.
What tips would you give to people who want to find a good deal at a thrift store? You need to visit a lot, since it's hit or miss. Many of our customers are here every day, and they get the best bargains. You also need to look through everything very carefully or you'll miss a lot .
Do people inadvertently give away very valuable items? An eightysomething Watertown lady was cleaning out her friend's house and said I could come by and take whatever I wanted. 'It's all garbage,' she said, including an original World Series 1939 program, which turned out to be a collectible which sold for $400. And my grandmother once bought a cubic zirconia ring for 50 cents, except that when she got it checked out, it was real, and appraised at $6,000.
What's the best part of being a thrift store owner? If I rip my pants while working, I'll just go to the floor and buy a pair of jeans. I need sneakers now, so I'm hoping something comes in, in my size. I've become so frugal that I don't buy anything new, and we're living the good life because of that. We don't spend a lot of money, and we're not in a lot of debt.
Your store's name is Sister Thrift. Do you get any reaction to that name? A lot of people thought we were associated with the church. They thought we were nun sisters. And it's sometimes hard to get men in here; they think it's a women's thing. But it's the right name for us - we're sisters, and we're thrifty.

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05-03-2009
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boston globe....

In the interest of helping our readers find the best deals, we checked out what's happening at a couple of consignment shops. We first stopped in at Raspberry Beret (yes, named for the Prince song), the Wakefield outfit that expanded into Porter Square in December. Along with $12 jeans (Paris Blues) and an array of funky, printed tops for around $10, we spotted a Giorgio Armani plaid blazer ($110), a smattering of Ann Taylor Loft and J.Crew, and a fetching collection of handmade and vintage jewelry. Raspberry Beret is at 1704 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617-354-3700, and 1110 Main St., Wakefield, 781-245-2293. www.raspberryberet.us.

Though it's not a consignment shop, you'd be hard-pressed to find a better vintage clothing stop than Bobby From Boston (19 Thayer St., Boston, 617-423-9299, www.bobbyfromboston.com), a preferred stop for costume designers ("Titanic," "A Beautiful Mind"). Until the end of the month, menswear and accessories are 20 percent off, meaning you can stock up on old Harris Tweed jackets and Levi's, bow ties, suspenders, Foster Grants, and plenty of other pre-1970 finds you didn't know you needed.

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10-03-2009
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Le Chic Boutique is apparently the name of a consignment store that's about to open at the former CD Spins location, 235 Elm Street, Davis Square Somerville.

Here's their website.

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11-03-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucy92 View Post
Though it's not a consignment shop, you'd be hard-pressed to find a better vintage clothing stop than Bobby From Boston (19 Thayer St., Boston, 617-423-9299, www.bobbyfromboston.com), a preferred stop for costume designers ("Titanic," "A Beautiful Mind"). Until the end of the month, menswear and accessories are 20 percent off, meaning you can stock up on old Harris Tweed jackets and Levi's, bow ties, suspenders, Foster Grants, and plenty of other pre-1970 finds you didn't know you needed.
Good to know, lucy...But, even after a 20% discount, you'd still be asked to pay a pretty-penny for vintage..

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20-07-2009
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story about the new goodwill in JP in todays boston globe (boston.com)
im old enough to remember the old goodwill down there and it was tiny.

With thrift store coming, a bit of a rift

Some in Jamaica Plain hoped new arrival would be more upscale

By Meghan Irons, Globe Staff | July 20, 2009
The Foot Locker had long seemed out of place on the 2-mile stretch of Centre Street that snakes through the heart of Jamaica Plain.
So when the sneaker chain closed less than a year ago, many residents had high hopes about what should fill the huge void it left behind.
Some wanted a Trader Joe’s, a stylish clothing establishment, or a large independent bookstore along the lines of Brookline Booksmith.
Instead, a Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries store will move in.
News of another thrift store, just a few doors down from another called Boomerang’s, has some in Jamaica Plain in a lather.
“I’m disappointed,’’ said Bluma Stoller, a 10-year Jamaica Plain resident and one of a number of people interviewed who had the same sentiment. “While I’m not against a Goodwill or having another thrift store here, it really doesn’t meet the needs of the neighborhood.’’
But supporters say the thrift store is a perfect fit for Jamaica Plain - a neighborhood with poor, working-class, and professional people who pass each other on the street, in quiet cafes, at the yoga studio, or the Chinese takeout.
“There’re so many people in JP that love getting cheap vintage things,’’ said Kendall Turner, a 20-year-old art student. “There are a lot of college kids here. A Goodwill will be very successful here. It’s definitely part of the JP scene.’’
Officials from both Goodwill and Boomerang’s say they don’t know what the fuss is about. Their stores, the officials say, will complement, not compete with, each other.
And when Goodwill opens at 678 Centre St. in October, they said, the Roxbury-based nonprofit will bring needed foot traffic onto Centre Street during a recession when more people are hunting for bargains.
“We really welcome Goodwill to the neighborhood,’’ said Jasmine Crafts, the store manager at Boomerang’s. “Anytime you move a thrift store, you’re going to get more people.’’
Thrift stores are seeing a boost in sales in these tough economic times, according to the National Association of Resale and Thrift Shops. In the first quarter of this year, resale shop sales were up by more than two thirds, according to a survey by the group.
Boomerang’s said its sales jumped 15 percent this year compared to its last fiscal year, and it recently opened a store in West Roxbury to meet demand.
Goodwill said sales increased 7.6 percent during the same time period. “Clearly there is a demand for Goodwill stores,’’ said James Harder, spokesman for Goodwill. “Some are people who need to shop at Goodwill and others are there for the thrill of the hunt.’’
Boomerang’s is smaller and crammed with goods. Goodwill stores have wide-open aisles, shopping carts, and racks stacked with color-coordinated clothing. Boomerang’s dedicates its proceeds to the Aids Action Committee of Massachusetts. Goodwill provides job training and career services to people with disabilities and those who are underserved.
“People are supportive of Boomerang’s because they understand their mission,’’ said Harder, who is also a Jamaica Plain resident. “But once they understand our mission they will be more supportive.’’
Frances Villon, an ardent supporter of Boomerang’s, said a competitor in the market will do nothing to sway her loyalty to the existing thrift store. “It’s like my second home,’’ said Villon. “This one’s for good.’’
Goodwill supporters say that it’s always good news when another charitable organization enters the community.
“If somebody wants to distance themselves from Morgan Memorial, then that’s on them,’’ said Richard Downey, president of the JP Center/South Main Streets. “Morgan Memorial does great work for the community - and the world. It’s a beacon.’’
But even Downey concedes he had hopes for a small business or restaurant for the space the Goodwill store will occupy.
Steve Murakishi, who co-owns Fire Opal, an American handmade craft store, has a ”wait-and-see” attitude about the Goodwill store. He doesn’t know how well the store will do on Centre Street, but he’s willing to give it a chance.
Goodwill is no stranger to Centre Street. For 11 years it operated at 708 Centre St., but closed shop in 2003 because the space was too small, Harder said.
The new store will occupy 6,300 square feet and aim to emulate the neighborhood’s trendy style.
At JP Licks Homemade Ice Cream Cafe on Centre Street recently, Andy Loven was optimistic about the new thrift store . “I’m excited about it,’’ said the 24-year-old supervisor. “It’s a recession and it sells cheap stuff. We can always use a cheap place to shop.’’

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20-07-2009
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Block Party & BBQ on the South Street Mall

Join the shops at South Street this Sunday July 26th for a Block Party and BQQ on the mall, Art, Music, Icy Treats and summer Refreshments, provided up and down the street.

Punky’s Haberdash, a traveling vintage emporium inside a 1954 Bellwood Aloha trailer, will be parked at 68 South Street Sunday afternoon. If you like Dame, if you like 40 South, then you will have more vintage on a two block stretch for one afternoon than you could possibly ever hope for.

Ferris Wheels and The Hallway will be BBQing on the Mall, while summer refreshments and specials will be offered up and down the street: Ginger Lemonade punch at Dame, Icy Treats next door at McCormack and Scanlon. The Hallway will be serving up music and showing fantastic art for your Sunday stroll.

And secret spy specials are sure to be had at 40 South, Yesteryear, Petal and Leaf, Dame and other South Street shops. You’ll have to stop by to find out.

Then head on over to Salmagundi for the perfect end to your afternoon I hear that they've got something fun going on

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06-08-2009
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two new thrift/consignment shops in the area

We finally hit two new-ish consignment shops we’ve been hearing about. The first, Hidden Jules (playfully named, in part, for owner Julie Malcolm), keeps a bit of everything in its cozy, but not crammed, space. Tops ran the gamut from H&M to BCBG, with most in the $8-$22 range. A small $10-and-under rack had Gap, Calvin Klein, and Kenneth Cole denim, while a bin by the register had a fetching, brand-new DKNY top for $9.80. There’s a tiny selection for guys and a room devoted to kids, with little bins of socks and tights, hats, and tops for $1-$2. Hidden Jules is at 671 Adams St., Dorchester, 617-379-3388.


In Andover, Chic Consignment Closet deals in higher-end wares for ladies, most priced at one-quarter to one-third of retail. (In other words, no $10 jeans here.)We found a few great dresses by Diane von Furstenberg, Free People, and BCBG Max Azria, as well as an Alice & Trixie silk sundress that we deemed perfect for a wedding we’ll be attending later this summer, priced at $70 (originally around $300). The store also has good selections of denim, jewelry, handbags, and shoes. Select summer clothing will be marked down 50 percent in mid-August. Chic Consignment Closet is at 46 Main St., Andover, 978-474-1755. www.chicconsignmentcloset.com

boston.com

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06-08-2009
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Not necessarily vintage but was pointed here to see if there were any places to sell off a few items I have atm in Boston, all in good quality and were bought at an Consignment shop in Soho (first top; Nakkna, second; Akris, third; Burfitt) Just not sure where I could sell them off for a decent price, any help is defiantly appreciated


my own pic; original sized image


Last edited by ElleLesley; 06-08-2009 at 01:49 PM.
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