How to Join
the Fashion Spot / the Finishing Touches / Shop Till You Drop / shop by city
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
10-06-2006
  121
front row
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: US
Gender: femme
Posts: 392
Just on Yahoo news. I thought Faust would be interested in the small bit on Soho:

Rising rents threaten NYC neighborhoods
Inside the flower wholesalers on 28th Street lie stacks of roses in every color of the rainbow. Outside, the sidewalk blooms with pink and blue hydrangeas, zinnias, lilacs, hibiscus. The air smells of day lilies.
The flower district — a short stroll from the Empire State Building — has been perfuming the north Chelsea air since the 1890s. But the district is so threatened by rising rents and new residential and hotel development that it may have to be moved or disappear entirely.
"We're history," said Bill Nikolis, a third-generation flower seller who owns Bill's Flower Market with his brother, Jim. "The market has been kind of just blown apart by all this development."
It is a common refrain around Manhattan these days. Luxury apartments and chain retailers are sprouting up everywhere as colorful neighborhoods like the flower district fade. Long gone are districts for butter and eggs, leather and radio parts. The Fulton Fish Market, a lower Manhattan fixture for 180 years, moved to the Bronx last year.
As recently as the mid-1990s, the flower district took up several blocks, and walking along Sixth Avenue meant picking your way through a jungle of potted palms.
"Ten years ago this street was booming," said Rob Houtenbos, whose Dutch Flower Line offers peonies from New Zealand and lilies of the valley from Holland. "There were 40, 50 stores filled with beautiful flowers."
But the district has since shrunk to one block and will have difficulty staying there much longer.
The neighborhood, once a warren of low-rise retail and light industry, was rezoned in the 1990s to include residential uses. Condo towers have sprung up along Sixth Avenue, and more apartments and hotels are being built on the block the flower district occupies, displacing several businesses in the past year.
Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, said he mourns the loss of unique neighborhoods as Manhattan is increasingly given over to luxury apartments and chain stores like Starbucks and McDonald's.
"There's this homogenizing steamroller that's kind of moving through the borough that's making Greenwich Village the same as Harlem, the same as the Lower East Side, the same as the Upper East Side," he said.
In Greenwich Village, several of the small theaters that gave the neighborhood its character — such as the Sullivan Street Playhouse, where "The Fantastiks" played for a record-setting 42 years — have been gutted to make way for condos, Berman said.
In SoHo, high rents are forcing small and medium-sized businesses out in favor of mega-retailers like Apple and Bloomingdale's. Retail space in the Meatpacking District that went for $25 a square foot six years ago now commands $125 a square foot or more, said Gene Spiegelman, a broker with Cushman & Wakefield.
There have been several attempts to move the flower district to another Manhattan neighborhood or possibly to the Bronx or Queens.
Houtenbos said his customers — retail florists, party planners, big corporations — are tired of Manhattan's scarce parking and would follow him to Queens. "I think it is essential for the market to move," Houtenbos said. "Every location is a compromise."
But consensus on a move has eluded the Flower Market Association, which represents about 35 storefront businesses. Manhattan sites are too expensive and some merchants believe the outer boroughs are too remote.
Berman, whose group tried unsuccessfully to help the flower district join the Meatpacking District, said a move seems unlikely.
"The attrition scenario is the most likely one," he said. "It's just going to kind of dribble away and there won't be any flower market anywhere."

  Reply With Quote
 
12-06-2006
  122
V.I.P.
 
faust's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York City
Posts: 10,312
/\ thanks. yea, it's sad - there are A LOT of closed storefronts in SoHo - people just can't afford it. Many stores relocated to the fringes or moved to other areas.

  Reply With Quote
13-06-2006
  123
backstage pass
 
aldn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Gender: homme
Posts: 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by metal-on-metal
I also think that the magic of SoHo passed on years ago. But I agree with faust that the coming of a Bloomies just sort of cements all of that in.

I don't blame spots like the Prada store (a work of art in itself) for the onslaught of this. The Prada store isn't a faceless generic outpost of goods. Places like Club Monaco, H&M, and the like have really ruined it for me. I mean, do we really need three Banana Republics in a radius of seven city blocks? It's just insane! SoHo died the minute that truly special and unique establishments were torn down to house the worst of low-end American fashion and shopping.

Don't get me wrong. Club Monaco and H&M are fine for what they are. But the way these companies have infiltrated SoHo is quite sickening. There are still areas (around Crosby and Howard, around Grand and Mercer, down by Thompson and Grand) that have somehow evaded all this. But I'm sure it's only a matter of time before it all becomes one huge strip mall. The Mall of America, right in your backyard!
All those BR's are sick! They have a nice piece or two. But whoa!

__________________
"The one thing that always scares me is to be like the Miss America of the moment, because next year there is a new Miss America" - Alber
  Reply With Quote
24-01-2008
  124
windowshopping
 
thounowest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Brooklyn.
Gender: homme
Posts: 36
I must agree with this thread to the fullest. I walk around soho and can't help but be annoyed by the flock of tourists and common folks attracted by the massive likes of stores such as the GAP H&m ( nothing wrong with H&M cuz I do shop there )and blommingdales.
When You have an "american eagle" store next to the Prada store. That's when you know soho has lost its wonder.
Mercer street seems to be the only street able to sustain the crueling affects of such stores and gives me a sense of relief.
Maybe its time for a new hood to rise. *tear*
Say.. Marc perhaps should open a store in Dumbo. Brooklyn > )

  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  125
downtown girl uptown life
 
JetSetGo!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,725


The day Victoria's Secret opened on Prince Street...it was over.

RIP
the local post office (now the Apple store)
Jerrys, a SoHo dining institution (now Michael Kors)

  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  126
Rive Gauche. Rive Droite.
 
LostInNJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: NYC
Gender: homme
Posts: 2,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by thounowest View Post
I must agree with this thread to the fullest. I walk around soho and can't help but be annoyed by the flock of tourists and common folks attracted by the massive likes of stores such as the GAP H&m ( nothing wrong with H&M cuz I do shop there )and blommingdales.
When You have an "american eagle" store next to the Prada store. That's when you know soho has lost its wonder.
Mercer street seems to be the only street able to sustain the crueling affects of such stores and gives me a sense of relief.
Maybe its time for a new hood to rise. *tear*
Say.. Marc perhaps should open a store in Dumbo. Brooklyn > )
Please, no! As much as I love Marc, opening a store in Dumbo would ruin it. The west village isn't the same anymore because of that...between the Coach store, Marc, and Magnolia's, it is overrun with tourists.

  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  127
boop
 
Luxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: NYC
Gender: femme
Posts: 7,034
Maybe I'm just biased but I don't think a neighborhood can ever "die" - it can change but its not like the entire place is going to be wiped out by a plague. Yes Soho has more commercial stores but its not as though the small stores are completely gone. Yes some very well liked stores have closed but there are other stores still striving. And new areas in Manhattan or Brooklyn that are chock full of great non-chain stores. New places rise up and become the place to go. I don't think Soho has lost all its charm. I remember when it was a different place but I don't mind it now so much. There is a problem with street overcrowding from tourists but I just shop during times when the tourists aren't out yet or in areas that aren't as close to Broadway. The further away from that you go the more you'll find unique shops and unique people.

That said I never get the vitriol directed at tourists. Its not like they can help it most of the time - when you travel you inevitably become a tourist even if you think you're too cool for that. Some tourists might not be the most stylist people but I don't feel as though they're somehow a pox upon the city. Non-fashionistas have to travel too.


__________________
What do I think about the way most people dress? Most people are not something one thinks about... - Diana Vreeland
Twitter / Tumblr
  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  128
scenester
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 53
^^ great post Luxx.

  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  129
downtown girl uptown life
 
JetSetGo!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,725
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luxx View Post
Maybe I'm just biased but I don't think a neighborhood can ever "die" - it can change but its not like the entire place is going to be wiped out by a plague. Yes Soho has more commercial stores but its not as though the small stores are completely gone. Yes some very well liked stores have closed but there are other stores still striving. And new areas in Manhattan or Brooklyn that are chock full of great non-chain stores. New places rise up and become the place to go. I don't think Soho has lost all its charm. I remember when it was a different place but I don't mind it now so much. There is a problem with street overcrowding from tourists but I just shop during times when the tourists aren't out yet or in areas that aren't as close to Broadway. The further away from that you go the more you'll find unique shops and unique people.

That said I never get the vitriol directed at tourists. Its not like they can help it most of the time - when you travel you inevitably become a tourist even if you think you're too cool for that. Some tourists might not be the most stylist people but I don't feel as though they're somehow a pox upon the city. Non-fashionistas have to travel too.

I totally get that. And I really do appreciate that point of view. It's just hard to see a place I used to love become someplace I don't. I know we are all tourists at some point, and I always try to keep that in mind. They are also an important part of our city's economy, but since 9/11, New York has been completely overrun. I know this giant surge has come in support for our wonderful city and I am thankful of that, but still, it's really made the city experience a lot less wonderful. We are quickly becoming just like everyplace else. And what's the point of travel when everyplace is the same.

And sadly, this is not just about Soho, it's about the East Village, Times Square, Union Square and so on. It's about the national franchises taking over what was once a unique place to live and visit. It's happening worldwide, but it's just hard to watch. And as you say, thank goodness for Brooklyn and beyond for offering an alternative. Of course, those who knew and loved Brooklyn before are not so happy with what is going on there now, but such is progress...


Last edited by JetSetGo!; 27-01-2008 at 10:15 AM.
  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  130
backstage pass
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 601
I know! The locals are running out of neighborhoods! Honestly, I hope NoLIta isn't next. Downtown is way too touristy now. SoHo and TriBeCa have become household names rather than areas that attracted brilliant artists and merchants from the city. I have begun venturing uptown more and more for this very reason. Yes, people complain of the snootiness that the UES exudes, yet it seems to be one of the only neighborhoods in the city to keep its persona.

  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  131
rising star
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: NY
Gender: femme
Posts: 191
^ i agree. i just moved to the UES (movin' on up!) and it almost seems quieter, more like a neighborhood rather than a tourist trap...I can walk down the street and not get frustrated at all the commotion..that is, if i avoid 5th ave (i'm on York) Nonetheless, the streets are certainly much wider. But to my point- when I go to visit my friend down on Chambers I marvel at all the hot dog chains and girls in pink pants that they bought from forever 21 that make me want to puke.

  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  132
fashion elite
 
DandyWarhol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 2,686
Quote:
Originally Posted by thounowest View Post
I must agree with this thread to the fullest. I walk around soho and can't help but be annoyed by the flock of tourists and common folks attracted by the massive likes of stores such as the GAP H&m ( nothing wrong with H&M cuz I do shop there )and blommingdales.
When You have an "american eagle" store next to the Prada store. That's when you know soho has lost its wonder.

i totally agree.. as of late, its all been tourists attracted to the name "SoHo" but they know nothing else about it really, except that oh its supposed to be the "hip" and "cool" place to shop, where all the "in" new yorkers go, so lets go there too!
it is annoying..

__________________
BLOG
I'll be dancing with myself.
  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  133
downtown girl uptown life
 
JetSetGo!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,725
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandyWarhol View Post
i totally agree.. as of late, its all been tourists attracted to the name "SoHo" but they know nothing else about it really, except that oh its supposed to be the "hip" and "cool" place to shop, where all the "in" new yorkers go, so lets go there too!
it is annoying..
Are you saying Old Navy isn't hip and cool? jk

I've been a EV/LES girl my whole life.
And now, I live in Harlem...

  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  134
boop
 
Luxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: NYC
Gender: femme
Posts: 7,034
Quote:
Originally Posted by JetSetGo! View Post
I totally get that. And I really do appreciate that point of view. It's just hard to see a place I used to love become someplace I don't. I know we are all tourists at some point, and I always try to keep that in mind. They are also an important part of our city's economy, but since 9/11, New York has been completely overrun. I know this giant surge has come in support for our wonderful city and I am thankful of that, but still, it's really made the city experience a lot less wonderful. We are quickly becoming just like everyplace else. And what's the point of travel when everyplace is the same.

And sadly, this is not just about Soho, it's about the East Village, Times Square, Union Square and so on. It's about the national franchises taking over what was once a unique place to live and visit. It's happening worldwide, but it's just hard to watch. And as you say, thank goodness for Brooklyn and beyond for offering an alternative. Of course, those who knew and loved Brooklyn before are not so happy with what is going on there now, but such is progress...

I know what you mean JetSetGo!, I was having a bit of a zen moment when I wrote that post but I do understand how aggravating it is to see your neighborhood overrun by tourists all day. Its frustrating - especially when the effects of globalization are so blatant. I mean do we really need 4 Starbucks within 4 blocks of one another? The influx of chain stores and global merchants can eat away at the overall character of a neighborhood and it is frustrating. I remember when Times Square wasn't this massive amusement park-esque trap of family restaurants and Disney plays.

I do wish that these things were confined to certain areas. There should be more neighborhood control of who is allowed to open up shop. I feel like outside of the city residents have more of a say as to which businesses are allowed on their turf.

There is a little hope, as you said Harlem is wonderful, UES is also quiet and wonderful and Brooklyn (while booming in popularity) has yet to be hit by the two Gaps on every corner infestation that prevails in some parts of Manhattan.

I guess I just feel a bit bad for those tourists. I mean they're the brunt of every joke and granted its hard to take anything in velour seriously but I feel like the problem lies not with the ubiquitous girls in pink pants but with the companies who are allowed to set up shop in areas that used to be more residential as opposed to just giant outdoor shopping malls.

And I do feel as though some of those stores (not all of course) are good things. H&M is great and I don't mind it being there. Same goes for the Apple store and a few of the other non sequitur outposts. I think its just a matter of giving the people who live in that area more say as to what stores are allowed to come in the first place.

On a side note I find it sort of odd that one would even come to New York to do the kind of mall shopping that is elsewhere. Things are so much more expensive here! Its a little hilarious that one would even shop for that sort of stuff in those areas.

__________________
What do I think about the way most people dress? Most people are not something one thinks about... - Diana Vreeland
Twitter / Tumblr
  Reply With Quote
27-01-2008
  135
downtown girl uptown life
 
JetSetGo!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,725
Luxx I really LVE your point of view.

I work in Times Square, and I am endlessly amazed at the crowds of tourist rushing into the same places they can presumably find at home Applebees, The Olive Garden, etc. I really do appreciate the people who come here and want to get the real NY experience, or what's left of it, but most are not here to do that.

When we were kids and travelled to visit family in different parts of America, we loved to go to the fast food restaurants and stores we couldn't find at home. Zoning was very strict here then, and as you mentioned, I believe the residents of the city must have had more say in what happened here. Eventually these businesses came, and out went much of our city's incredible uniqueness. But somehow, the city allowed it to go. You are right. It is not the over-tanned Juicy and Ugg-wearing tourist's fault. We've given them what they want, the biggest mall ever in the safest city we've ever been.

And no, it's not all bad. I do love H&M and Apple, plus lots of other places that have been a part of this mass-consumer influx.

The city is still special and like no place else, at least for now. I've never been anywhere that could meet the energy, excitement and pace of this city and I love it. Truly.

  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
death, soho
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:00 AM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. 2014 All rights reserved.