Fashion and Responsibility - Ethical questions

Discussion in 'Fashion... In Depth' started by Mutterlein, Oct 9, 2005.

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  1. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Active Member

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    ^ I suspect Chanel isn't going to go bust ;) But I was thinking this could explain the quality change some people have noticed in recent years.
     
  2. vetements

    vetements Member

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    And the same goes for Kering and LVMH unfortunately.

    I have always been curious how the equation works out in fashion, now I guess it somewhat makes sense, and prices of branded good have been going up year by year...what with decreasing costs like that?! It’s quite appalling really.

    To me this is as scandalous as the METOO movements, and I hope some explanation can be given by the said companies at least.

    In the long run, I can foresee the real artisans are going to be affected and we are left with fast fashion in the disguise of ‘quality merchandises” with fantastic marketing campaigns.

    I wonder can Vuitton suitcases still survive a Titanic shipwreck now...
     
  3. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Active Member

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    ^ I think that would make a good magazine story ;) Not one that any magazine with LV advertising would do, of course ...
     
  4. dodencebt

    dodencebt Well-Known Member

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    Interesting to see the brands that are mentioned in that New Yorker article appearing as least transparent according to the Fashion Transparency Index.

    Also, again - kudos to Kering for being a pioneer for change in the luxury sector. They are clearly on top of their game.

    wwd.com
     
  5. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Active Member

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    ^ Isn't 31-40% still a miserably failing grade?

    I'm surprised that Bottega Veneta wasn't able to do better than that.
     
  6. FlorysTrend

    FlorysTrend New Member

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    Clothing is an important part of our lives. But, at the same time, it is an ethical minefield of difficult supply chains and resource wastage. It leads consumers through that complex minefield and many sustainability issues in the clothing industry.
     
  7. ghostwriter10549

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    :shock:

    Source: https://www.businessoffashion.com/a...s-question-destruction-of-38-million-in-goods
     
  8. Phuel

    Phuel Well-Known Member

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    You and me both.

    Chanel will never come close to going bust. The world as we know it will end in a desert wasteland/polluted junkyard/dystopian dustball, resembling Fritz’s Metropolis, with the few elite ruling over the masses high up on their mountaintop skyscrapers— and they’ll be wearing Chanel. And Karl will likely still be alive, right there alongside them all...

    When it comes to ethical responsibilities in high fashion, we are talking about the ultimate paradox. Unless one's there every step of the way in how your garment is constructed, no one can’t possibly be claiming one's wearing something that is genuinely up to one’s personal ethical standards in its production. It’s near impossible for any of thee huge conglomerates to be truly ethical in their production practices. The very idea that we’re paying so much money for a garment for the simple sake of fashion, luxury and status, goes against the ideals of ethics, as far as I’m concerned. And no garment or accessory is worth the designer prices we’re paying for.

    The only truly ethical gesture is to support Third World organizations that educate, train and employ tailors/seamstresses/dressmakers who source their raw materials locally, paying these groups a fair wage that will support their livelihood and sustain their practices. Or, more on a pragmatic level, search out local tailors/dressmakers that align with a more ethical approach and support them. Because once we talk about hugely overpriced designer pieces, we’re in the realm of decadence and selfish indulgences. I’ve stopped kidding myself some time ago, and have accepted that this industry is not important nor vital in the greater scheme of things, and I’m wearing designer clothes for my own selfish needs and wants. And I’m fine with that side of myself.
     
    Benn98 likes this.
  9. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Active Member

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    ^ When I was in junior high, I remember seeing US union tags in the clothes I bought. It's been forever since I've seen one. Local manufacture is an option too ...

    I'm not convinced that luxury goods are unethical per se. My goal is to buy something good once and have it last, and for it to be beautiful as well as useful. Luxury goods can be a way to accomplish that (arguably the best way). I will say that I think it's ridiculous that expensive goods aren't ethically produced. For what I'm paying, they darn well should be.
     
  10. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Burberry Stops Destroying Product and Bans Real Fur

    A PR backlash enveloped Burberry following the revelation that it destroyed £28.6 million worth of unsold product last year. Now, the company is ending the practice and banning real fur. In a global exclusive interview, Imran Amed sits down with Burberry CEO Marco Gobbetti to better understand the thinking behind the move.

    Image source: blog.satvakirani.com
     
  11. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Active Member

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    ^ You are so bad with your illustrations :D

    Destroying merchandise makes me so angry, no matter who it is doing it. :yuk:
     
  12. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    It just reeks so much of strategy, lol! For them to say they will no longer be destroying merch seemingly wasn't enough, they had to add the fur announcement to it as just well, just to amplify the message.

    To date I've received three mailers from Business of Fashion, one of them exclusively plugging this move, and the other two with the headline bandied very prominently. To that end the illustration above seem apt, lol.
     

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