1977-1980s BOY London

Discussion in 'History of Style : A Remembrance of Things Past' started by chalk_love, Oct 1, 2009.

  1. chalk_love

    chalk_love New Member

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    [​IMG]

    BOY London is or was a designer fashion clothing company and store who were big in the eighties.

    Originally involved in Acme on King's Road which along with Westwood and McLaren's shop SEX, clothed most of the early punks. John Krevine went on to open Boy in 1977 with is bondage gear and T-Shirts, gaining immediate notoriety with his shock value window display and inevitable prosecutions. Despite its punk roots the shop-cum-label soon became a mainstay of the high street boom with the Boy logo becoming the most bootlegged name of the decade.

    BOY clothes were worn and made even more popular by many musicians including : BOY GEORGE , PET SHOP BOYS, JOHNNY sl*t (of goth band SPECIMEN) and many others.

    Does anyone know anything else about this brand?

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    Images from MAFIA HUNT blog, uuiuu tumblr, shaguaramas geocities, les_girlettes geocities, and euro_beat_80 geocities.
     
  2. chalk_love

    chalk_love New Member

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    via steffyyob photobucket
     
  3. eugenius

    eugenius Well-Known Member

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    Wait, is this the same line that produced those b-ball caps w/ giant cleary acrylic letters emblazoned on it that spelled out BOY, or was that just a cheap knock-off?
     
  4. chalk_love

    chalk_love New Member

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    Apparently it was counterfeited all the time. Not suprising, the clothes are highly brand oriented. In that sense it reminds me of Jeremy Scott and House of Holland, except it was new and interesting 30 years ago.
     
  5. chalk_love

    chalk_love New Member

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    Chloe Sevigny

    DiamondSea's post on the Chloe Sevigny thread via buzzfoto.com
     
  6. chalk_love

    chalk_love New Member

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    teenwitch tumblr
     
  7. dizzytacks

    dizzytacks Active Member

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    i found a vintage womens leather vest by BOY london and wanted to resell it online. how much do you guys think i could potentially sell it for?
     
  8. XavierRaphael

    XavierRaphael Well-Known Member

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    so grunge. love it.
     
  9. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    I don't know---

    but it is currently for sale at the Patricia Field store on Bowery in NYC...
    so it definitely still exists in some form because the stuff is brand new and not counterfeit...

    all the coolest kids wore this stuff to the clubs in NYC in the 80's
    it was next to impossible to get in the states, so everyone who had it was envied by the crowd because they most likely got it in London......
    we all wanted to go to london where all the cool music was coming from at the time...

    :mohawk:
     
    #9 softgrey, Sep 9, 2013
    Last edited by moderator starrb81477: Sep 9, 2013
  10. Morphe

    Morphe Active Member

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    And not a word about the mindblowingly obvious Nazi symbols used by this brand?!
     
  11. yesitsdagny

    yesitsdagny Active Member

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    They shouldn't have revived this brand. It perfectly reflected the zeitgeist of the middle-late 80s and, indeed, was an iconic part of the club wear of that time. These days it just falls out really tacky. But I still have a soft spot with it, afterall, my favorite Boy George was an avid fan of the brand.:cool:
     
  12. Phuel

    Phuel Well-Known Member

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    You mean the eagle?

    I suppose that was part of BOY's punk past to shock?

    I remember the brand was resurrected and carried at... The Bay (a Macy's type department store where fashion goes to die) here in Canada sometime in the 1990s-- can't recall if it was the mid-90s or the late-90s. I remember seeing it advertised in a Bay catalogue: Tees, sweats and of course, the infamous cap for the whole family-- I think there were even Swatch-style watches. I don't know what marketing genius thought that it was a great idea to license a brand that was born of punk to appeal to the consumer masses. It was dreadful.
     
  13. Morphe

    Morphe Active Member

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    And the swastika and and..
    I don't care how "punk" or "alternative" it all seems, those are symbols of hate and suffering. No excuses here.
     
  14. prosperk

    prosperk Member

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    I don't recall BOY actually using the swastika or runes in its range of ready-to-wear punk knock-off.

    I would suggest that it was more a case of flipping the finger to the false 'order' represented by the German National Socialists as well as to hard-right groups like the National Front and the British Movement, to name a couple of the tamer ones at large on London's streets at the time. The eagle was certainly of the Nazi design but denazified, not unlike the eagles found on 1957-pattern World War Two military awards approved by the German authorities for wear by WW2 veterans serving in the new armed forces. And by Germany's NATO allies. But in this case, it was more a case of the swastika brusquely obscured by the sons of the victors than obediently removed by a government full of ex-Nazis out to play nice with their new masters. But one has to understand cultural and sub-cultural history to get a handle on all of this. I think the only time I saw a punk provoke a serious reaction over a garment, it involved a Keep Rhodesia White teeshirt, which really was offensive. But the large and very black Rude Boy thumping him obviously didn't get the irony.

    The Soviet heraldry that makes it onto catwalks and teeshirts from time to time is just as offensive to anyone who understands how vicious and murderous the USSR regime and their collaborators were. But again, one has to know one's history. Coming back to Nazi-related motifs, I do recall being taken aback by the tee-shirts with legends like "Hitler's European Tour" and the names of the countries invaded by the Germans and, worse, "Belsen was a gas". There again, the uneducated prick who dreamt that one up clearly didn't know that there were no gas chambers at Bergen-Belsen as the actual death camps were fairly hidden away in remote areas in Eastern Europe.

    SEX was a more authentic boutique. But when a large punk fell on someone's leg, breaking it, after bouncing off the window, we realised that Viv and Malcolm had fitted armoured glass, which was a bit too 'Establishment' for us. We tried very hard to smash it on several occasions. But we didn't buy ready-distressed gear from anyone anyway. We wore our denim in the hard way. All that said, our lot didn't have much time for street fights because we haunted second-hand record shops looking for Rockabilly music, which was very hard to find back then. Rickabillies tried to be offensive at times. Nazi belts holding up coveted selvage denims were about the limit though. One time, lolling against a wall near the Markham Arms, thumbs in such a belt, I was accosted by a little old dear walking the usual leprous lapdog: "That's a nice belt, dear. My Jack used to wear one just like it. Brought it back from the war! You could do with a haircut, dear, nice-looking young man like you. If I was thirty years younger…"

    I never wore the belt again.
     
  15. AL92

    AL92 Well-Known Member

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    Do you realise how many nations use eagles as national symbols. It's not only exclusive to Germany/Nazi era. Such heraldry can be seen in the coat of arms of Russia, Albania, Egypt, Indonesia etc.

    It's simply a universal heraldic symbol used by many.
     
  16. prosperk

    prosperk Member

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    I think it was more of a commercialisation or even a rip-off of an aspect of street style involving the wearing of symbols with the power to offend straight society. A few white supremacists in 1%er motorcycle gangs aside, with 1939-pattern Iron Crosses on their leathers and Wehrmacht or Waffen-SS belt buckles aside, most followers of sub-cultural movements like Hard Rock, Heavy Metal and Punk wouldn't have known much about what the Hitlerian rendering of the swastika or the runes appropriated by the Nazis came to symbolise beyond the fact that it caused maximum offence to the Straights. Wearing a BOY teeshirt was considered pretty sad and lame back in the day. Synthesised rebellion. That said, the aesthetic appeal of the 'rebranding' of Germany by the Nazi regime remains very powerful. One suspects that most if not all of the fashionistas mincing along Steve Victim Boulevard in BOY re-editions would probably have difficulty telling us the dates of WW2.
     
  17. BerlinRocks

    BerlinRocks New Member

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    that's so good to have you around prosperk....
     
  18. prosperk

    prosperk Member

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    Danke, Kamerad!

    It's interesting that nobody reacted in all these months. THFS is a great barometer of where Fashion is and why, despite its immensely beneficial effects in preserving old skills and creating jobs, it is ultimately doomed to chasing its tail rather than evolving, because most of its observers are educationally sub- or abnormal. Introduce some historical facts into a thread, or personal experience, as with this thread, and people drop the thread like a hot rock. It's sad. I was just in Fashion Central on a smart Caribbean island and and they were all up for exciting chat...until fact entered into it.
     
  19. masquerade

    masquerade God Save McQueen

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    You are right that the eagle is used by many cultures. BOY's logo, however, is nearly identical to the Nazi symbol. The Eagle clutching the swastika is replaced with the O of the boy logo. I am sure its really nice to be able to dismiss these claims, but these are symbols associated with hate, and it is incredibly demoralizing to see them as fashionable.

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    #19 masquerade, Sep 29, 2014
    Last edited by moderator kismetle: Sep 29, 2014
  20. prosperk

    prosperk Member

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    I missed this reply years ago and the author may not even read my response. Earlier in the thread, I wrote:

    There are plenty of offensive elements in Fashion. Black leather, Boy logos using the 3rd Reich eagle, Soviet symbols, tee-shirts bearing Alberto Korda's photo of the ruthless mass-murderer Ché Guevara or Rote Armee Fraktion logos. The list is long. I've even seen idiots wandering around Paris dressed as Khmer Rouge murderers, although they probably thought it looked like Yohji accessorised with a red or pink scarf. And then there was the infamous Comme des Garçons stripy pyjama show featuring models in striped outfits with coloured patches on the chests, like inmates in German concentration camps. All all of the German press in attendance got up and left as did quite a few other guests. Someone, somewhere, is always looking to be offended and hurt. It's a form of inverse bullying in some cases, a passive-aggressive strategy aimed at imposing one's will on others. A power trip. In other cases, the offence given and taken is sincere.
     
    #20 prosperk, Apr 26, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2019

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