Burberry

Discussion in 'Designers and Collections' started by kit, Apr 15, 2004.

  1. kit

    kit New Member

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    Two useful articles here :-

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,3604,1192021,00.html

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/story/0...1192089,00.html

    It's interesting that OROCHIAN , in the F/W comment thread , says that Burberry has major image problems . :eek:

    I am patriotic , but you could say that one CAN have TOO much of a good thing . :cry:

    The PRORSUM collections are superb , and are praised by LENA :heart:

    You could see that perhaps PPR has a point in taking a low profile with the GUCCI and YSL Rive Gauche designers , and concentrating on the exclusivity of the brands . B)

    I DO hope Christopher Bailey does NOT ' come a cropper ' , as he is one of the VERY best designers around !!!! :flower:

    Any comments ? :unsure:

    KIT :innocent:
     
  2. TheSoCalledPrep

    TheSoCalledPrep New Member

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    They need to capitalize on quality instead of that trendy pattern.
     
  3. mikeijames

    mikeijames no tom ford, no thanks.

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    i find it very interesting that you point out that burberry may suffer from too much exposure. i really think that it positions the company to take explore any direction it will. they played the celebrity card just right in my opinion so much so that most people i know use burberry as sort of stocking stuffer gifts (when i first got my muffler, it was seen as pure ostentation, now it's commonplace)...

    i think that all big labels have slowly started to pull back from the trademark logo and/or pattern that was so ubiquitous around the turn of the century...everyone is focusing not only on what they do best, but on things that are individual and precious (as opposed to mass produced and uniform).
     
  4. TheSoCalledPrep

    TheSoCalledPrep New Member

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    :cry: Induviduality, please. Turn the LV monograms away!
     
  5. Meg

    Meg inspired contemplation

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    didn't read the article but i adore the prosum collection and wish there was a bit more of a focus in shops on that collection than the novacheck and other 'diffusion' pieces (ie. something with just the burberry name on it, not actually from the prosum collection).
     
  6. Orochian

    Orochian New Member

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    It was indeed me who voiced the opinion that Burberry has problems that even a superbly designed and styled Prorsum collection can't solve.

    And even after reading the two articles my exact sentiments still stand.

    It's interesting that they're boasting so enthusiastically about their sales success and yet have not disclosed the breakdown of their business. I have a feeling that a vast majority of their profits are coming from their licensed product ranges - umbrellas, raincoats for dogs, and above all the horrid Blue Label collection that's designed, produced, and sold exclusively in Japan.

    How exactly would sales of these products affect Burberry's image as a high-end fashion label? Not very favorably, I'm afraid. Sure, the brand has gone a long way in a short period of time since Bravo took over, but it has much more to do with their marketing (and Bravo's connections within the industry) than with the strength and quality of their products.

    Burberry, and to a certain extent all other British labels that have been associated with that sense of quitessential "Britishness" by consumers, naturally have a very favorable marketing advantage because of that unique appeal among foreigners. The quote from the clueless Chinese teenybopper from Hong Kong exemplifies that mentality quite succinctly - it doesn't matter what their products look like, or how they're made, they'd gladly pay 10 bucks for a garbage bag as long as it has the house check on it. These are people who prioritize the flash quotient above all else in their purchase of designer goods - I'm not familiar with the term "footballer's wives" but I'm guessing that's a uniquely British equivalent of what I'm describing.

    All of which inevitably leads to the overexposure that you're worrying about, kit. And it's certainly not doing Chris Bailey any favor. Because no matter how exquisitely designed and made the Prorsum collection may be, instinctively it's off my shopping radar precisely because I don't ever want to be associated in any way with the flashy figures clad head-to-toe in the Burberry check. (And I know many people who feel the same way). It also doesn't help that Prorsum is priced and positioned to take on an insanely competitive segment saturated with hugely desirable and coveted labels, most of which don't carry the image burden of much more accessibly-priced and mass-marketed diffusion lines. It wouldn't surprise me the least bit if sales of the Prorsum line have been dismal; and Burberry most likely wouldn't care either, as the line's raison d'etre is more like a promotional tool by gaining editorial coverage than to actually carve profitable sales out of the lucrative high-end RTW segment.

    If you take a look at their various collections - Burberry London, Prorsum, and the accessories range, the sense of schizophrenia is almost Dior-like, and there's almost no attempt to make the overall aesthetic coherent within the brand.

    A final, but fatal problem with Burberry, is their origin and quality of manufacturing. I've seen authentic Burberry products being made in the States, Japan, England, Turkey, Hungary, and Italy, with varying levels of craftsmanship. A fundamental asset in the management of upscale brands is a tight quality control and a recognizable and respected origin of manufacture - both of which are obviously lacking in a production system that obviously relies on a high percentage of outsourcing to foreign-owned factories.

    Some might attempt to argue that Burberry Prorsum is made exclusively in Italy and hence should be seen as a seperate, individual label. But I wonder just how many general consumers are even going to bother inquiring about the trivial details of line distinctions within the brand. To the average lunching lady, Burberry is Burberry.
     
  7. Meg

    Meg inspired contemplation

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    It was indeed me who voiced the opinion that Burberry has problems that even a superbly designed and styled Prorsum collection can't solve.

    And even after reading the two articles my exact sentiments still stand.

    It's interesting that they're boasting so enthusiastically about their sales success and yet have not disclosed the breakdown of their business. I have a feeling that a vast majority of their profits are coming from their licensed product ranges - umbrellas, raincoats for dogs, and above all the horrid Blue Label collection that's designed, produced, and sold exclusively in Japan.

    How exactly would sales of these products affect Burberry's image as a high-end fashion label? Not very favorably, I'm afraid. Sure, the brand has gone a long way in a short period of time since Bravo took over, but it has much more to do with their marketing (and Bravo's connections within the industry) than with the strength and quality of their products.

    Burberry, and to a certain extent all other British labels that have been associated with that sense of quitessential "Britishness" by consumers, naturally have a very favorable marketing advantage because of that unique appeal among foreigners. The quote from the clueless Chinese teenybopper from Hong Kong exemplifies that mentality quite succinctly - it doesn't matter what their products look like, or how they're made, they'd gladly pay 10 bucks for a garbage bag as long as it has the house check on it. These are people who prioritize the flash quotient above all else in their purchase of designer goods - I'm not familiar with the term "footballer's wives" but I'm guessing that's a uniquely British equivalent of what I'm describing.

    All of which inevitably leads to the overexposure that you're worrying about, kit. And it's certainly not doing Chris Bailey any favor. Because no matter how exquisitely designed and made the Prorsum collection may be, instinctively it's off my shopping radar precisely because I don't ever want to be associated in any way with the flashy figures clad head-to-toe in the Burberry check. (And I know many people who feel the same way). It also doesn't help that Prorsum is priced and positioned to take on an insanely competitive segment saturated with hugely desirable and coveted labels, most of which don't carry the image burden of much more accessibly-priced and mass-marketed diffusion lines. It wouldn't surprise me the least bit if sales of the Prorsum line have been dismal; and Burberry most likely wouldn't care either, as the line's raison d'etre is more like a promotional tool by gaining editorial coverage than to actually carve profitable sales out of the lucrative high-end RTW segment.

    If you take a look at their various collections - Burberry London, Prorsum, and the accessories range, the sense of schizophrenia is almost Dior-like, and there's almost no attempt to make the overall aesthetic coherent within the brand.

    A final, but fatal problem with Burberry, is their origin and quality of manufacturing. I've seen authentic Burberry products being made in the States, Japan, England, Turkey, Hungary, and Italy, with varying levels of craftsmanship. A fundamental asset in the management of upscale brands is a tight quality control and a recognizable and respected origin of manufacture - both of which are obviously lacking in a production system that obviously relies on a high percentage of outsourcing to foreign-owned factories.

    Some might attempt to argue that Burberry Prorsum is made exclusively in Italy and hence should be seen as a seperate, individual label. But I wonder just how many general consumers are even going to bother inquiring about the trivial details of line distinctions within the brand. To the average lunching lady, Burberry is Burberry. [/b][/quote]
    I agree with many of your comments, mainly regarding quality control

    As previously stated I love Burberry prorsum however if they want to be seen as a high fashion label the whole of burberry needs to pull itself together
     
  8. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    great post orochian :flower:

    thx for the topic kit :flower:
     
  9. FabulousFashion

    FabulousFashion New Member

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    Great articles, I'm young and have pretty much only been acquainted with Burberry for the past two years, so this was all very interesting for me to read! I love Burberry, I think it's very classy looking, yet it's difficult because some of their stuff isn't high quality like other top-notch designers! Orochian you brought up some fantastic points about the company. I must say that I still loveeee Burberry though, because most of their stuff fits in with my style, the reason I buy all my designer stuff, not just because it's designer!
     
  10. pennyfei

    pennyfei Member

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    Burberry, another "Gucci" like rebuilding process that succeeded! Congratulations!
     
  11. amchan

    amchan New Member

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    burberry prorsum

    Anyone here like burberry prorsum?
    i think christopher bailey does a great job for burberry.
     
  12. AlexN

    AlexN New Member

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    Welcome to TFS. There is a thread or two on Burberry Prorsum. If you use the search function, you will find them. : )
     
  13. amchan

    amchan New Member

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    ya...i just saw them...but personally i like the aw04-05 collection more then the new one...^ ^
     
  14. helena

    helena Swim Upstream

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    Designer of year keeps chavs in check

    [FONT=Geneva,Arial,sans-serif]Jess Cartner-Morley, fashion editor
    Friday November 11, 2005
    The Guardian


    [/FONT][FONT=Geneva,Arial,sans-serif]Burberry, home of the trenchcoat (chic) and beige check (chav) was last night given a boost in its attempts to shake off the "chav" element. Christopher Bailey, creative director of Burberry and creator of its lauded Prorsum catwalk collections, was named Designer of the Year at the prestigious British Fashion Awards at the Victoria & Albert museum.
    Bailey, 34, is a Yorkshireman who detests the chav label as snobbish and patronising, and bought his first Burberry trenchcoat from a local church hall jumble sale as a teenager. In the four years that he has been with Burberry, it has become a billion-pound company.


    Bailey is a very English designer who has been known to build dry stone walls for fun and who has used David Hockney, the Mitford sisters and most recently the young Princess Margaret as inspiration for collections. Nonetheless, the story of his success highlights the problems facing the British fashion industry: after studying at London's Royal College of Art, he departed for New York where he worked for Donna Karan. From there, he moved to Gucci in Milan, where he worked under Tom Ford. Even now, his collections for Burberry are staged not in London but in Milan.

    Indeed, none of the three nominees for the top prize of Designer of the Year show in London. Sophia Kokosalaki recently decamped to Paris, and Roland Mouret, whose hourglass Galaxy dress has this season become a red carpet staple and a worldwide sellout, has joined the New York catwalk schedule. But as always, the real story of the evening was as much who wore what, as who won what. For once, thousand-pound-plus dresses were in the shade, outshone by the highly prized £59.99 Stella McCartney for H&M dresses. It sold out within hours of going on sale yesterday.
    [/FONT]
     

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