Designer John Galliano Arrested in Paris, fired from Dior

Discussion in 'Rumor has it...' started by IAmLordZen, Feb 25, 2011.

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  1. Ciao!Manhattan

    Ciao!Manhattan New Member

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    I felt a bit like crying, looking at the collection and the speech and the whole thing really, they're really putting Galliano down, after years of services. Really sad.
     
  2. before

    before New Member

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    The article's statements are hypocritical if not gross exaggerations if one looks into Dior's history:
    cocoperez.com (not the best source but still...)
     
  3. mistress_f

    mistress_f Hell on Heels

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    ^exactly. i see why toledano would like to paint a pretty picture of the situation but..
     
  4. m.j.

    m.j. New Member

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    message to John from me:
    make Dior, not war.
     
  5. Fantomette

    Fantomette Active Member

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    I'm not one of the people who demonizes Galliano but I think it was normal to fire him. Now I'm stunned by the attitude of the people at Dior. On the one hand they're pushing things very far by erasing his name from their website and attempting to rewrite history. On the other hand they choose to present his ultimate collection for them. How can they act like they don't want to have anything to do with Galliano and still have his work greeted by applause? The word "opportunistic" mentionned in an earlier article seems accurate to me.
     
    #725 Fantomette, Mar 4, 2011
    Last edited by moderator boopboop: Mar 4, 2011
  6. xPedro

    xPedro Active Member

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    Guys, have Anna Wintour said anything about what happened to John?
     
  7. Kenysha75

    Kenysha75 New Member

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    Really what a lovely & touching story ...:shock:
     
  8. zhaopian

    zhaopian New Member

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    well, what would you do, if you were in the management of Dior here?
    find yourself with a head designer who has made some remarks that regardless of whether he meant them or not, was drunk or sober when he said them, out of his mind or aware of what he was saying, have exploded in all media, made many people angry, and could damage your business A LOT.

    Galliano's merit as a designer is overshadowed by the immediate need to decrease the potential losses to minimum. And from a business perspective what the house is doing is the only reasonable thing to do.

    And those things surfacing about the history of the house of Dior and its past relations as hypocritical are ridiculous. By similar logic could we say that the countries selling weapons to the Nazis at the time and who are now completely against them are also hypocritical?

    This story needs to end soon. :flower:
     
  9. prosperk

    prosperk New Member

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    Rumours of LVMH's desire to get rid of John Galliano have been circulating for some time. His nervous breakdown, for that it what amounts to, has provided them with a pretext for doing so. However, it remains to be seen how damaging their indecent haste will prove to be in the context of the Dior brand, especially if John Galliano's lawyers get him off. Toledano's speech was interesting, particularly his reference to Christian Dior's sister.

    [​IMG]

    Much as I don't wish to seem as if I am nitpicking, I am going to pick a nit here. In fact, I am going to pick a couple of nits. Maison Dior was actually founded in December 1946. But I'm getting away from the subject here. I just thought that the people raving about protecting Christian Dior's legacy and history might at least get basic facts right.

    I did not know Catherine Dior had been in Buchenwald. Neither did she. Black mark #2 for the Dior PR people! The truth is more interesting. Catherine Dior (1917-2008), sister of Christian Dior, whose was cited today by the Maison Dior PR machine as a survivor of Buchenwald, one of the more notorious Nazi concentration camps, was a former inmate of the even harsher women's camp at Ravensbruck. It might seem an unimportant detail but when one is dealing in the facts surrounding a case as serious as that of John Galliano's alleged anti-semitism, facts should be important. There again, when simply lynching someone, facts tend not to matter too much.

    Catherine Dior was arrested by the Gestapo in June 1944 for Resistance activities and was deported on one of the last prison trains from Paris on 15.8.1944 with 2,197 other prisoners, of whom 543 were women. Just 838 of the people packed by French police into the cattle wagons making up this train returned from German captivity. The men were processed through Buchenwald, as the BU suffixes on their prison number indicate, and the women through Ravensbruck. Catherine Dior's prison number was 57183RA.

    After her arrest, Christian Dior made strenuous efforts to get his little sister released but none of the German officers and French collaborators whose wives he had been dressing seems to have been able to help. A society friend intervened and persuaded the legendary Swedish consul. Raoul Nordling to intercede. Nordling had just concluded a deal with the German High Command in Paris that allowed prisoners and deportees to be placed under Swedish protection.

    Catherine Dior was on what some sources refer to as "le denier convoi" or "the last transport", although others left Paris just before the insurrection got under way. Packed with 2,197 men and women delivered to the Gare de Pantin from the Paris prisons of La Santé, Fresnes and le Cherche-Midi by the French police, the train left Paris early on 15.8.1945.

    Some idea of how slow progress was is indicated by the fact that the train had only covered some 100 kilometres when the Resistance attempted to halt it at Dormans on 17.8.1944. This was due to low-level strafing and bombing by Allied aircraft as well as delays to allow German resupply trains through to the front. August 1944 was one of the hottest on record and conditions in the cattle wagons were atrocious. A little further on, the French stationmaster at Revigny, supported by the International Red Cross, tried unsuccessfully to persuade the SS officer in charge of the train to stop.

    That night, the train rolled into Bar-le-Duc, halfway to the German border from Paris. The IRC only managed to obtain the release of three women and a Roman Catholic priest who was ill. Even pleas from Pierre Laval, head of Pétain's collaborationist government, made no impression upon the train commander and his superiors.

    According to the story, Nordling was told by his German contact in Paris, a Major Huhm, that he could have Catherine Dior if the train had not left Bar-le-Duc by 14.45 hrs on 18.8.1944. Unfortunately, it had.

    Mlle Dior was subsequently transferred from Ravensbruck to an exclusively female detail producing explosives in the notorious military prison in Torgau. From Torgau, she was posted to the "Anton Kommando", another all-female detail producing explosives in a disused potassium mine in Prussia. The death rate in these kommandos was quite high. Her last recorded "job" was in an aviation factory in the suburbs of Leipzig, captured by the US Army on 19.4.1945. Catherine Dior was liberated near Dresden in April 1945.

    The Dior family had had no news of Catherine until Christian Dior got a phone call late in May 1945 telling him that she was on a refugee train arriving the following morning at the Gare de l’Est. After eleven months of starvation rations, Catherine Dior was emaciated and unable to eat solids for months.

    Awarded the Croix de Guerre, which was rare for a resistance member as it was usually reserved for regular armed forces, Catherine Dior also received the Valour Cross of the Resistance, the Combattants Cross and The King’s Medal for Courage in the Cause of Freedom (UK), as well as other medals, and was appointed a chevalière of the Legion of Honour. In other words, a pretty impressive rack of medals, earned the hard way. In 1947, her brother named the perfume Miss Dior in her honour.

    Quite what Catherine Dior thought of her niece Françoise Dior - http://www.ina.fr/video/CAF96034711/colin-jordan-et-francoise-dior-se-marient.fr.html - and her activities, which included arson in synagogues, promoting Hitler and marrying Perfidious Albion’s leading National Socialist, one can only imagine.

    As for Christian Dior "dressing the wives of Nazi officers", he may have made a couple of outfits for discerning German officers looking for something nice from Paris for their wives at home, or for their French mistresses. However, again, let's look at the facts.

    Having worked at Piguet in the late 1930s, Christian Dior was called up in 1939 and, fortunately for him, posted to a part of France which was relatively untouched by the fighting in May and June 1940. Demobbed after the armistice, he remained in the south of France until the end of the 1941, when he returned to Paris hoping to work again for his old employer. However, the job had gone so Dior was engaged by Lucien Lelong of Balmain. Lelong was the man who prevented the Germans from, in essence, stealing the entire Paris couture industry, lock, stock and barrel, and moving it to Berlin. The Germans then tried to close it down fourteen times, only to be thwarted by Lelong.

    The Vichy administration helped Lelong by putting pressure on their German 'partners' but strict controls were imposed because of wartime shortages. No fashion house was allowed to feature more than seventy-five outfits and each outfit was further controlled in terms of the amount of materials permitted. The Germans actually closed Balenciaga down in 1944 because the house exceeded its quotas. Despite this, couture sales rose by 400% in 1941 and 1942, as Christian Dior was starting his job at Balmain.

    So, shock, horror, how many Nazi wives did Christian Dior dress? To get into fashion shows at that time, one needed a special pass, issued by the Couture Création group. Of 20,000 such passes in 1942, a mere two-hundred were given to the wives of German officers. These women were usually from German high society and had probably spent as much time in France before the war as their native Germany - and Austria. They would have been the sort of women on the invitation lists of the French wife of the German 'ambassador' in Paris, Otto Abetz, a committed francophile who, with other Germans posted there during the Occupation, did his best to lessen the severity of conditions for the French living under the so-called Franco-German 'alliance'. Anyway, Christian Dior is bound to have made some frocks for a few women who were married to German officers stationed in Paris. He probably made a few frocks for wives of prominent French collaborators as well. After all, he was working for Balmain.

    Those of you still reading this might understand me when I say that things are never black and white. Christian Dior didn't make a point of dressing Nazis and wasn't a collaborator. But it makes for a more attention-grabbing line or two to say that he did, because some of the German society wives he might have measured up from 1942 to 1944 might have held the same sort of National Socialist views later held by the daughter of his awful, homophobic, fascist brother Raymond Dior. Catherine Dior wasn't in Buchenwald but, hey, how many of the people listening to Sydney Toledano doing the equivalent of shouting "Leper! Leper" whilst the Dior webmaster was erasing John Galliano from the house's cyber-history in best Stalinist fashion would actually know the difference? It's a good soundbyte, and even better if some of the people out there end up believing that Catherine Dior - and, by extension, Christian Dior - was Jewish, because, after all, the Second World War was all about liberating the Jews of Europe from Nazi death camps, wasn't it? At least, that's what Hollywood tries to tell us...

    Catherine Dior, after whom Christian Dior named his first perfume "Miss Dior", once said of Galliano that he had destroyed Dior. It was of course more of an aesthetic, subjective judgement than a factual one, given the financial success of the brand during Galliano's time at the helm. It might be truer to observe that Dior destroyed Galliano, isolated from his real friends by a circle of corporate minders, struggling with his demons, grief-stricken by the loss of Stephen Robinson, who worked and drank himself to death trying to keep up with the increasingly penal regime governing Planet Fashion, with no time off to go into rehab even if he wanted or needed to do so. Small wonder that Galliano would 'escape' for a few drinks at night or in the early hours.

    Shame that he chose La Perle to slum it, because it is a truly ghastly place full of wannabes, never-weres and total losers. But it was close to the house and, in any case, when one drinking to ward off the demons, an asocial hellhole like La Perle isn't such a bad place for a few Mojitos.

    As for his comments, well, I've heard much worse than that from some pretty high-profile fashion glitterati and they were perfectly sober. I've known John for almost eighteen years and if he's a Jew-hater, it's news to me. As for the alleged anti-Asian remarks, same applies. As for the commentaries by various leading fashion people, I'd venture to say that Karl Lagerfeld and Patricia Field came close to the crux of the matter. However, time will tell.

    PK
     
    #729 prosperk, Mar 5, 2011
    Last edited by moderator openCfor: Mar 5, 2011
  10. prosperk

    prosperk New Member

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    Another thought provoked by the Dior firm's showtime disclaimer: Christian Dior undoubtedly wished to help women find "joyfulness" in escaping from the dreariness of immediate postwar styles, dictated by shortages, hence The New Look of 1947, but this was rooted in his wartime work.

    Having observed the in-your-face zazou* streetstyles of young men flipping the finger to the German occupiers and their bleak Nazi anti-style and art, as well as the cheap suit aesthetics of Pétainism, Dior remarked that female streetstyles were boring and grey by comparison and set about trying to improve matters.

    But hey, it's like Volkwagen, right? It all kind of just appeared after the war and let's have no argument about it. And let's not talk about some of the French luxury brands that were deeply implicated in 1930s and 1940s Nazism and Fascism either. "Don't mention ze var!", as John Cleese intones in Fawlty Towers.

    *The zazous' styles were to some extent inspired by the zoot suit styles favoured by some youthful black and white American jazz aficionados of the early 1940s, as well the pachucos of downtown Los Angeles and other West Coast Mexican ghettos of the time. Christian Dior also staged his own sartorial rebellions against Nazi and Pétainiste mores, although the results were more Oscar Wilde than Cab Calloway.
     
  11. prosperk

    prosperk New Member

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    John Galliano, in The Big Issue, just after arriving at Maison Dior.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    #731 prosperk, Mar 5, 2011
    Last edited by moderator openCfor: Mar 5, 2011
  12. Master Wood

    Master Wood New Member

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    Have they deleted him from the website? That is appalling.
     
  13. KKnardi

    KKnardi Active Member

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    well, dior.com isn't a history book. it's mainly for advertising the current fashions.
     
  14. nanker_phledge

    nanker_phledge Active Member

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    I wholeheartedly agree with you...I completely agree with the fact that they had to fire him,and I don't get people who call for an abuse of 'freedom of speech' when it comes to their decision to end their relationship with him,and who would try to overlook his grave racist speeches in favor of his work.HOWEVER,I'm shocked by their decision not to mention his name and to go as far as erasing it from their site.They seem to forget quite easily that they got where they are because of him...And that's where I have a problem : it seems a little too easy to keep the good aspects of his collaboration (the creative aspect of it,his last collection and most importantly the commercial success of his collaboration with them) while erasing his name and making abstraction of the provenance and source of that profit and success.If that's how they want to end their relationship of 15 y with him,well surely they can give back all the money they got because of him and stop merchandizing every item he has created/worked on ? Right ? Right.

    On another note (and unrelated to their decisions) Just as much as I hate the fact that people could overlook the gravity of his speeches,reversibly,I don't get how certain people can make/create a correlation between talent and amorality.A lot of artists from L.F Céline,to Polanski,to Kazan have acted in a very abject manner,that doesn't contradict the fact that they were talented in their own right.I'm all for judging the human being but I have a problem with 'forgetting' the artist while making profit off his work.
     
    #734 nanker_phledge, Mar 5, 2011
    Last edited by moderator Randompatterns: Mar 5, 2011
  15. J'ador-DioR

    J'ador-DioR New Member

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    I'm not surprised that they've handled it this way. They atleast recogised that he was a brilliant designer. Anti-semitism is very, very serious...it's not like people throwing around the N-word or any other form of prejudice. It's all very sad but he won't ever recover from this...most of the big wigs in fashion have Jewish ancestry and anyone defending him should be very careful.
     
  16. brooksie

    brooksie Member

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    That's just it tho....the designs that came down the runway ARE Galliano's and came from the distant past of last week. While I'm sure the mains had to pull a few rabbits out of hats to get this collection finished and presentable, the designs themselves were clearly his and were being produced well before his arrest.

    I could understand if they wanted to remove his name AFTER the show (and perhaps his own label shows IF it does), but now? They can't have it both ways w/o looking hypocritical on the matter. You can't have the clothes/accessories and make the money yet pretend the clothes just magically appeared w/o his input OR that even the public has such a short attention span. :rolleyes:

    Invoking "the ghost of Christian Dior Past" doesn't exactly make much sense in these circumstances. People nowadays have search engines. :lol: It's makes the complexities of this sitch all the more glaring and tangled. If they think it's only Gallino that will take all the lumps here, I believe they're sorely mistaken.

    Since they choose to show this collection at all, scrubbing him from the website and that shady Toledano statement seems illogical IMHO. We're not blind ya know...we know Juan Carlos' signature style after seeing it for decades even w/o being told, but still...:innocent:
     
  17. Teratel

    Teratel Active Member

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    Good that he's fired. Saying ugly things like that. There is no excuse for the things he said and I don't care if he was dronk or not, that kind of racist ugliness is in himself. If he would have lived in WW2, he (being homosexual) would have not survived the Holocaust. He is not only a racist, but also stupid.

    I am not surprised that Dior has dirty hands during WW2. There is a lot of history involved with fashion designers that collaborated with the Nazis, but history faded away.

    In WW2 during the German occupation in France, Coco Chanel Chanel was involved with the Nazis. Coco decided to close her stores in 1939 and lived comfortably in the Ritz Hotel protected by her lover and Nazi connections. Chanel took the Nazi occupation as an opportunity to take back control from her perfume line from Jewish (Wertheimer family) stake holders, “Chanel tried to wrest control of her perfume manufacturing from a Jewish family, taking advantage of pro-Aryan laws.” After the war she went to switzerland, because she was not wanted any more. Thanks to the British and Americans (that loved her designs) Chanel made a comeback in 1954. Sales grew and Chanel was rehabilitated.

    During the WW2 Louis Vuitton collaborated with the nazis during the German occupation of France. They increased their wealth from their business affairs with the Germans. They did everything to keep the business going.

    Although France is ostensibly a country of written rules, regulations and laws, they exist solely to be waived, bent or adapted ( système débrouillard or système D) to your own advantage.

    Germany
    Hugo Ferdinand Boss also known as Hugo Boss, was an early nazi party member who procuced uniforms (Sturmabteilung, SS, Wehrmacht, Hitlerjugend) for the nazis. Now he's known for Boss Black, Boss Selection, Boss Orange, Boss Green, Hugo, Baldessarini, shoes, watches, glasses etc.
     
  18. educo

    educo Active Member

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    :shock:^^^^^^wow.
     
  19. mistress_f

    mistress_f Hell on Heels

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    ^ wow i only knew about chanel. i especially had no clue about hugo boss. wtf. and i thought italy was the only place where people active during the regime still were able to continue their businesses.
     
  20. iluvjeisa

    iluvjeisa clever ain't wise

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    Please stay on topic.
     
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