Everyone's Doing It: Fashion Brands Take on Social Media

Discussion in 'Fashion... In Depth' started by Amelia, Oct 17, 2009.

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  1. Amelia

    Amelia neorealismo

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    From: http://www.wwd.com/media-news/everyones-doing-it-brands-take-on-social-media-2318508//?full=true

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  2. Amelia

    Amelia neorealismo

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    [source: wwd]
     
  3. fashionchat

    fashionchat New Member

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    Social Media and Magazines

    Not even luxury brands seem immune to social media, but there certainly seems to be certain brands who are using social media better than others. I'm studying how traditional media is transitioning and subsequently translating to the online media world and the many different outlets that exist online. In that too, others seem to be able to translate their magazines into an online format that is more engaging and appealing for various reasons.

    Right now I'm specifically studying Vogue and Vogue.com. Style.com used to be other online "home" of Vogue, but Vogue has started to make and build its own domain. But what do you think of Vogue.com? Is Vogue translating online the way you would like? Or would you like to see something different (Anna on twitter perhaps?!)
     
    #3 fashionchat, Nov 20, 2009
    Last edited by moderator starrb81477: Jun 23, 2010
  4. MimiV

    MimiV New Member

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    Personally I believe that luxury brands need to be very cautious with this new trend. On one hand these social medias are a great way for brands to attain a large audience at a low cost. Also, if your brand doesn't have a Facebook page, a twitter account, an iPhone application, etcetera, you risk to "fall behind" the competition.

    However, the idea of all these sites, and internet in general, is that it is accessible to everyone (the masses) as opposed to the luxury industry which is based on rarity, elitism and non-accessibility to the masses.

    Which in consequence means that a luxury brand needs to work hard on making its internet platform coherent with the "values" of the brand - i.e balancing accessibility and exclusivity. (something that some luxury brands have proven to not be that good at doing...)
     
  5. mikeijames

    mikeijames no tom ford, no thanks.

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    one of the most useful aspects of the social media phenomenon has come in the way it has began to eliminate the idea of anonymity on the internet. it's very easy to hold ardent and strong opinions about anything from politics to fashion while one sits under the mask of anonymity. however, part of the usefulness of the internet and social media circles around the ability of these houses to unveil the masses of the internet and parse out their actual customer base. with the rise of cookies and the popularity of websites like facebook, a retailer or fashion house knows whether or not the person representing themselves as a versace fan actually clicks on their ads, wanders around on their corporate website, and eventually makes a purchase.

    on the flip side of the coin, within the world of day-to-day high-end retail, it allows personal shopppers and high-end sales associates to stay in contact with their actual customers and gain insights into how they live. it also allows them another channel to pursue sales opportunities to their best customers. while ten years ago, a sales girl at gucci may have had to run through her little book and call her best clients, she can now write on their walls, comment on their statuses, and send them personal invitations.

    as this continues to blossom, this will become the future face of the high-end sales experience: the relationship building opportunities this media provides truly outshines everything that has come before in many remarkable ways from both a overarching way and an individual day-to-day way.
     
  6. amydang

    amydang New Member

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    I think ALL industries should be embracing the use of social media. Its such an amazingly intimate insider's look that we are looking for and that can only help us learn and love a brand further. I love big names like DVF embracing it and tweeting away! all brands have to know how to maintain their brand and following but we've had to adapt to all new marketing mediums and this should be an exciting new challenge for fashion houses.
     
  7. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    most of the people who i know who shop luxury brands..do NOT use things like facebook...or twitter...

    i see mostly teens and twenty-somethings...
    and bored moms or students...

    and i'm certainly not going to 'friend' any salespeople on facebook...
    :huh:...

    i remain unclear on just exactly what is so great about a brand having a facebook page...
    if i like a company and have placed an order with them...
    i wind up on their mailing list and get regular *email updates* from them...
    whether i want them or not!

    so why do i need to 'like' them on facebook?
    and why do i want them as part of my personal life?

    i don't get it...:ermm:
     
    #7 softgrey, Dec 24, 2010
    Last edited by moderator starrb81477: Dec 24, 2010
  8. iperlchen

    iperlchen daisy in my lazy eye

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    People pursue all kinds of self-expression. If a friend asks us for our opinion, we feel appreciated and happily give advice. If a space is created where we can unconditionally be ourselves, we feel encouraged to show it. That's my take on it. It's about creating an individualistic display. Some show it through their style, but most show it on their online profile. The movies, designers and books you 'like' say something about you because you nominate them for display. Do you stay up to date, do you 'dare' to have an opinion, do you know what you like, etc. I think people like to believe so. That fact is greatly used and abused on the internet by corporates who are looking for ways to increase sales. I think that's the only truth. :p Because that's the world today no?
    This is an interesting documentary that explains it a bit better: http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/the-century-of-the-self/
     
  9. mikeijames

    mikeijames no tom ford, no thanks.

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    obviously, that's clearly changing. most people -- whether they shop luxury retail or otherwise -- participate on social networking sites in some fashion. facebook alone has five hundred million members. the legions who keep stores like burberry, gucci, marc jacobs, chanel, vuitton, dior, et al afloat certainly make use of these websites. and, let's not forget, those big houses make up the majority of the luxury good market. the niche brands we tout on these websites exist on the margins.

    all that have vuitton bags, chanel shades, burberry jackets, marc jacobs dresses, gucci baby bags, etc.

    yes, but unlike traditional mail, one can "unlike" with the click of a button. have you ever tried to get off the gucci mailing list after making an impulse four figure purchase? for women who have "limited time," their stylists have much more intimate access to their lives than merely a facebook page. they're sending looks to their homes, they're going to their home for private fittings, they're inviting them into their stores after hours, they're calling them on the phone. facebook just extends that experience into a new media. it's not new behvaior, just new means. i've had sales people text me images of shirts that just arrive or shoes they i "can't live without" in order to get a quick sale.

    the nature of all sales hinges on the notion of relationship building. it's only through relationship building that one can effect increasing and regular sales from a customer. i don't care if its a banana republic sales girl remembering her customer's dress size and things she has in her wardrobe or someone from harry winston reaching out to clients to invite them to an exclusive event. these retailers and brands have always sought more insight into the personal lives of their clients in order to better position themselves for the sale. these social networking sites just provide a different mean and format to do that.
     
  10. RubyJewelStone

    RubyJewelStone New Member

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    I'm studying Advertising and Public Relations and we talk a lot about social media and "Web 2.0"

    In my opinion this could go one of two ways:
    • luxury brands lose their inherent sense of luxury by becoming so accessible
    • or marketers find some way of keeping the mystique of the industry in a way that won't make their customers restless

    I think it shows a somewhat selfish cultural shift, with people sharing all these things about themselves. Checking in to places. Posting pictures. Little status updates. Sort of selfish, myself included.

    I think some interesting examples are
    OscarPRGirl | twitter | tumblr | foursquare
    She does Public Relations for Oscar de la Renta

    Art of the Trench | website
    Integrates social media with the site to show the versatality and style of Burberry trenchcoats. It allows user submissions, but they are selected before being featured. It also has professional shots as well. Also, people can comment and connect using Facebook.

    The only problem is there is so much potential, but it's hard to figure out exactly what to do with it yet. After all it has developed so quickly in a short span of time!

    And relationship building is necessary. But the tricky part is find a non-annoying way to do it. Geting ads in your e-mail inbox is not cool, but for a while that was the only way people could think of to reconnect with existing customers on a broad scale. Now there's social media, but it is NOT a one way street. I tend to unlike and stop following those who forget that.
     
  11. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    mike...
    i get why THEY would want to invade my personal life in order to increase their opportunities for selling me something...
    i have a strong retail background and i am guilty of doing much of what you say myself with my regular customers and training my salestaff to do likewise...
    minus the facebook.social networking component, of course...as it was many...many...years ago...
    :innocent:...

    what i DON'T get is why i (or anyone else) would enable that behaviour by adding them to my 'social' network...
    i have actual friends...i don't need pretend ones who are just trying to sell me something...
    one of my biggest pet peeves, actually, is people who do nothing but promote themselves and/or their business via facebook...

    i feel like facebook is for friends and family...
    and should be private...
    otherwise it really isn't much fun...
    cause you can't post anything that isn't completely neutral for fear that someone will see something that they shouldn't...
    *not that i ever do (or say) anything that i shouldn't ...
    :ninja:
     
    #11 softgrey, Dec 24, 2010
    Last edited by moderator starrb81477: Dec 24, 2010
  12. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Being online totally open and accessible doesn't bring anything. It's mostly just emptiness. You can't replace a soul.
     
  13. mikeijames

    mikeijames no tom ford, no thanks.

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    yes, time magazine itself made note of this trend in 2006 with it's person of the year: "you." with the naming of mark zuckerberg as this year's person of the year, we find the trend ongoing. however, as i said earlier, it's just a new format for people to share these things. people have done those activities for decades. one but need to read the correspondence between any number of historical figure to find them logging all manner of emotional detail and everyday trifle.

    with regard to these luxury brands losing their luster because of these new social media, you'll find that these fears come about whenever a new format comes about. the reality remains that the younger generation doesn't really know about the auspices of prestige as they presented themselves in old media. for a fourteen year old girl, watching the holiday makeup collection video on chanel's facebook page has just as much impact as a similar feature might have had on "fashion file" twenty years ago or chronicled in a print feature in vogue magazine forty years ago.

    it's only going to happen faster and faster and faster. that's the nature of technology. fortunately, fashion remains one of the best equipped sectors to handle this sort of change because it's very business pivots on non-stop change.

    with all advertising, there's a fine line between aggravating and attention-grabbing. just ten years ago we were talking about "do not call" registries. and it still remains almost impossible to get off of some physical mailing lists. but from an advertising perspective, i think the metrics available with these web advertising (even facebook) allow businesses to spend so much more intelligently. it eliminates a lot of the guess work. you know EXACTLY who is "liking" certain items. you know exactly who is fiddling around on your website. you know who makes the purchase. that's something i feel that's very novel and game changing.
     
  14. mikeijames

    mikeijames no tom ford, no thanks.

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    while philosophically i agree with you, that's not where this entire social networking thing finds itself heading. many companies compell their workforce to involve themselves with their clients and customers through these social network platforms. so increasingly, it's not just a personal thing, but it's something more than that.
     
  15. wild roses

    wild roses Active Member

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    I personally don't think a luxury brand using social media in its various forms will dilute it or make it less exclusive: just because it is more "accessible" doesn't mean it is more affordable: Just because I can view a luxury brand item online doesn't mean I'll be able to afford it.

    I think the danger can come from a personal website appearing "universal" and therefore bland. The label's unique stamp and history might get lost if care wasn't given to how the site is created. But I do think there are ways around that. That might be one reason why luxury brands might be reluctant to embrace online media.
     
  16. iluvjeisa

    iluvjeisa clever ain't wise

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    That's true in the case where you have an intense emotional relationship with the person you're talking to. But otherwise I find it's almost better to talk through emails etc....keep things focused on what is said rather than who says it, how they say it....all those things that can derail one from the main issues.
     
  17. artizhay

    artizhay New Member

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    People have different motives for liking something on Facebook. It might not be that you actively seek out the company on Facebook just to like them. Most likely, people will have friends who have an interest in fashion as well, so if one of their friends likes a page, other people might impulsively follow suit. That's basically the principles of a "trend," people doing something because someone else does it and makes it look appealing.

    Of course, you have to realize what opportunities a Facebook page provides for not only the company, but for consumers as well. Yes, the company is ultimately trying to sell you something, but many times, a company releases exclusive offers, promotions, or other information on Facebook. People know they're already going to buy from that company at some point in time, just because they like fashion, so it's prudent to allow yourself to take advantage of offers given out by the company. And you can choose whether or not you want to view those offers. It's not like Facebook forces you to visit their page every time you login, and you can choose to exclude them from any updates on Facebook.

    You're in retail, so compare using social media to asking someone to buy add-ons or complimentary pieces to their primary purchase. Where I work (Office Depot, so many customers are in small business), this would be suggesting ink, paper, and other things a small business owner or office worker would need. It has already been statistically proven that people interested in fashion often are technologically-inclined, at least a little, and it has also been observed that a large portion of people spend most of their Internet time on Facebook. So consider Facebook the store - instead of saying, at a store, "While you're here, would you like to pick up some ink or paper?", companies say on Facebook, "While you're online, you might as well look through some of our catalog." It's efficient and smart marketing.
     
  18. KaitlynAliano

    KaitlynAliano New Member

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    I read an article recently about the woman behind Oscar de la Renta's social media accounts and found it intriguing! I deal with social media in my day job so it excites me that fashion brands are beginning to participate and engage their followers.
     
  19. Style Eyes

    Style Eyes New Member

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    Since this thread started I think that fashion brands have begun to embrace social media even more. It is not just about marketing to their customers but listening to them. I think with the financial environment being so tough and competitive brands are having to take advantage of every possible resource that is available to them.

    For me social media is great way to find out about the latest fashions and trends.I actively explore brands and retailers through channels like blogs, Facebook and Twitter so that I can decide which clothes I want to buy. I like to hear what others have to say about a piece of clothing and which pieces people really like.
     
  20. ThisIsAYes

    ThisIsAYes New Member

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    you just have to determine if social media usage is for your brand - your clients, people whom you're trying to reach may not be using it
     

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