Fashion Is Boring ... Have they Run Out of Ideas?

Discussion in 'Fashion... In Depth' started by smashinfashion, Nov 14, 2003.

  1. nqth

    nqth arndom

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    Johnny maybe fashion is always kind of, well, dull but now we can see more of it:))

    EDIT: which mean you are right by saying democratisation fashion is over rated. IN the other hand we must redefine our view of "fashionable". In the past if sth. was trendy, it was because it looked good. Now it is often bc huge money is invested and not a penny should be lost:-D
     
    #61 nqth, Sep 21, 2005
    Last edited by moderator : Sep 21, 2005
  2. zamb

    zamb Active Member

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    "FASHION WILL GO OUT OF FASHION"- Rudi Gernreich
     
  3. nqth

    nqth arndom

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    When:)) ?? I mean SS or AW:p
     
  4. finalfashion

    finalfashion New Member

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    I applaud you for your attention to detail, Faust, designers love customers that appreciate the minutae of the work they do... but the fact is that people like you are very few and far between (except here). And even you admit your aesthetic choices evolve. You are an elite, tiny target market.

    It's easy to dismiss mass market fashion because it obviously lacks the craft of elite fashion, but poor people have to dress too. It's not like in olden times when only royals could buy into fashion and the rest of us wore burlap sacks... if democratization is ruining fashion, would you rather have the good old days when 95% of the world didn't have any aesthetic choices at all? Sure those choices aren't always sophisticated... if they were people like us wouldn't stand out at all.

    To me the evolution of the industry is just as interesting as the creative act of making clothes. It's not always a happy story, that's for sure. But the tragedies of modern fashion do not make it boring, but fascinating (to me). I don't think I was trying to "prescribe" anything, just trying to be realistic.

    Thanks to everyone for thoughtful posts! I love a good argument.
    And I'm interested to know... when was fashion so interesting, what halycon days existed before we became "bored"?
     
  5. faust

    faust New Member

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    Oh, I think I know what you are saying. No, I don't want the "good old days" -- I'm not T.S. Elliot. I'm all for middle class, baby!!! :D I just wish that aesthetical tastes of the masses grew proportionally with their income. Unfortunetly they don't. :doh:

    I think the late 80's-90' were the halcyon for me. Japanese in full force, Belgians bringing so much freshness, and Helmut Lang still in primetime. High street "fashion" was next to nothing then - it comprised of Diesel, Nautica and Polo Jeans. There were no "designer" jeans for $200 ($100 for a pair of Diesel was considered proposterous (sp?)), no celebrity labels, and H&M and Target did not have runway shows.

    Like I said, not that I'm lamenting the state of fashion (the part of fashion that I follow is going strong - Ann Demeulemeester getting finanical backing to do menswear, Dirk Schonberger back in business, Raf Simons going for a cushy salary to Jil Sander to give himself more financial stability, Junya Watanabe and Alexander McQueen starting menswear, etc...), but yes, there were certain differences.
     
    #65 faust, Sep 21, 2005
    Last edited by moderator Forever GQ: Sep 21, 2005
  6. blackman

    blackman New Member

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    I don't know about the rest of you but I find this tragedy played out every day when I am deciding what to wear. Either I am dressing to be 'appropriate' and hate it, or I dress the way I want and am quietly snubbed (i live in small town Canada). I get bored of what I am wearing by the end of the day, change, and have WAY to much laundry to do. Sometimes I want to wear the same thing every day, just to see if i could do it then come back to fashion with a clear mind. Fashion magazines suck but every month i cant help it. Any tips on getting your head out of the closet?
     
  7. Ninja Pirate

    Ninja Pirate New Member

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    That's why we need to support people like Kirsten Dunst and Chloe Sevigny.
     
  8. Mutterlein

    Mutterlein Well-Known Member

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    I see what you mean. But as long as people like Anne, Raf, and Junya are doing there thing and there is still in influx of talented young designers (Henrik Vibskov, Ricardo Tisci, Tao Fujiwara) there will always be something there for the people who have a true appreciation for fashion.

    One thing I will say is that as much creativity there is in fashion, at the end of the day it is a business. If the clothes don't sell then there is no point in making it in the first place. (not that people should make clothes just to sell but it needs to get off the rack and be worn by someone!).
     
  9. KMismyIDOL

    KMismyIDOL New Member

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    It really saddens me that while there occasionally are wonderous pieces its feels like forever since anything TRUELY original has shown up.
     
  10. Mutterlein

    Mutterlein Well-Known Member

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    *Tao Kurihara. I keep confusing her name with Dai Fujiwara the engineer who works with Issey Miyake on A-Poc.
     
  11. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Well-Known Member

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    What would you like the peasants to wear, if not peasant skirts? :blink: That's not democratization of fashion, that's native costume :lol:

    Seriously, I am for democratization of fashion and good taste, but I think it's unlikely it will ever happen, in my lifetime anyway.

    Loved Cathy Horyn's article, and honestly I don't think she is guilty in the way Suzy and Anna are. I loved "pleasing Anna," and "Consensus is fatal to fashion."

    And btw, Zazie, what you said made perfect sense to me :innocent: I think you're right that we're trending away from a handful of important critics to more diversity of opinion. I love that we can say we hate something that Suzy loves (or says she loves) in this forum. I also love that a designer can't "sew it all up" by getting 2 or 3 women in his pocket--what the rest of us think matters, and will matter even more.

    I find fashion, not so much boring, as limited. It may well not be as limited as it feels, but there are certainly constraints--what gets editorial coverage, are you in or near a fashion capital to have access to more, etc. But the more you know, the smaller the fashion world seems--or so it seems to me.

    Personally I think availability is not a problem. I can't remember the last time I saw anyone else wearing something I own. So it's not an issue for me.

    I also think a focus on wearability is a definite positive. How could it not be? Fashion is wearable art, after all, and if it's not wearable, it's not meeting a basic criterion.
     
  12. nqth

    nqth arndom

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    EDIT: I don't know if this art should be here or in the Japanese thread. Mod please move if you think that is the place:)


    An article on
    http://www.theage.com.au/news/fashion/dressing-not-so-japanese/2005/09/15/1126750075651.html


     
    #72 nqth, Sep 21, 2005
    Last edited by moderator : Sep 21, 2005
  13. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Well-Known Member

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    I occasionally dress to be "appropriate" ... e.g., job interview, important meeting or conversation with the bosses, etc. Otherwise, I simply wear exactly what I want to wear, and what anyone thinks be damned. I guess you know you probably don't belong in a small town ;) I have lived in a small town before, and it can be hard to breathe. There's much more acceptance and much less pressure to conform in the city, I think :flower:
     
  14. FemmeFeline

    FemmeFeline New Member

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    Trendy vs true fashion


    Totally agree with the above statement. Too many people think that buying a trendy knockoff item copied from a higher end designers' original idea is fashion.
    These kinds of people don't care AT ALL about fit or quality or even the originality ( or lack thereof ) of the piece. All they care about is if someone famous has worn it or if it is in "style" ( the kind of style dictated by fashion magazines ). It drives me insane to see people abandon quality and great tailoring and originality for something that is trendy and fashionable in a false sense of the word.:yuk:
     
  15. finalfashion

    finalfashion New Member

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    I also grew up stifled and put down in a small Canadian town. Don't stop. Just keep confusing them. Don't count on being understood or appreciated.

    I never took my head out of the closet. But I had to get myself out of that small town to be happy in my own skin.
     
  16. KMismyIDOL

    KMismyIDOL New Member

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    I completely understand where you guys are comming from, I live about 45minutes outside Vancouver and while I aboslutely love being in the city, just outside of it ABOSLUTELY NO ONE knows how to dress. I live in a bit of a wealthy little beachy town, and the girls look like simpson sister knockoffs, its just wrong.

    Also I just want to resate that YES there is exciting fashion out there, but with all the terrible designer wannabes, its just getting harder to find.
     
  17. justinleaddict

    justinleaddict Push it to pop it!

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    I don't know what to think about designers selling out.... It is hard to believe, however, that galliano would make such a drastic change after all of those years. Why is more simple bad again?

    I think fashion is as exciting as ever- For some of us- all we have are pictures, too many pictures. If we were exposed to fashion in real life, it would never get dull, I'm sure.
     
  18. Melisande

    Melisande Active Member

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    I'm not sure you really mean that...it comes across as rather elitist...I know it can be sad to see ubiquitous trends. But what about people who want but cannot afford "fit, quality, originality,quality, great tailoring"? Or those who just ooze "fit, quality, originality,quality, great tailoring" and still look awful? The problem is not bad quality clothes. It takes a certain kind of education--not necessarily formal-- and cultural environment to value originality and art and critical thinking...which only very,very few people have in this world, rich or poor.

    Which brings us to the idea of editors and celebrities ruining fashion: when in history, in which community have things NOT been ruled by those with the loudest mouths, the most power? The greedy, the frightened, and the unthinking masses just follow suit. It's always the bravest intellectuals and truly original creators who are on the margins. Why would the fashion world be any different?...sigh...
     
  19. dennissyh

    dennissyh New Member

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    The whole universal is evolving, so is fashion. :blush:

    It's not boring, every season i see new things, new technique, new fabrication, new designers. Totally respect the creativity and originality of thought. I'm always looking forward for every season collections. ^_^

    It's always fun to look at TFS, all the remarks, criticism, observation, gossip and explaination. Don't you just adored fashion. :lol:

    :D I EMBRACE FASHION NOW AND FOREVER !!!
     
  20. Zazie

    Zazie Active Member

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    I think you have that "haven't a clue" thing right. I'd ignore the insults and answer in good faith, not just to you or Ghost, but also to others I respect. First, don't bitch that everyone is a pretentious attention-seeking twit. We all post anonymously, and earn NOTHING from participation. I prefer to receive due attention in person myself, IRL.

    Secondly, kindly point out *when* I have opined that fashion industry is separate from the designers. In fact, I will take it one step further from your position and observe that the end buyers, the market, i.e. US, are also part of the equation, because without US the market, the fashion industry cannot survive, so we can also dictate terms back to them.

    It's a full circle Fashion Industry,Designers-Fashion Elite/Media, Market, back to Fashion Industry

    The part that we can influence is the Market - it used to be a centralised system, and the Market accepts what is prescribed from the top down to them. With the internet, the way we view and judge fashion is different and diffused.

    It means that all of us who participate in these alternative fashion information structures need to go back to the basics of reminding ourselves what matters in fashion for us, imagination, creativity, thrills, and to use these as criteria to share views about fashon, and not just listen to the Vogue editors. It means that through us, the fringe designers that don't buy ads can have a way to reach a wider audience, and maybe force the big media to pay them due attention. But first, we need to be transformed ourselves, to make the effort to wean ourselves from the sheep-like mentality of following blindly the brands and the bling-bling.

    I am merely cutting through the pessimism and cynicism to remind everyone why they first care about fashion, and that they can make it personal, and make a difference and create some ripples through the industry.

    Web blogs and internet news have challenged the traditional stranglehold network news and major newspapers have on information and shaping opinion, for better or for worse. The TFS and other alternative fashion (not just the internet but indie shows, smaller magazines, etc.) structures can do the same, and transform the market, hence transforming the industry, no matter how limited at the moment.

    Anyway, I've said my two cents.
    :angry:

    PS. to others, won't be posting for a long time, off on a long vacation.:) Hope to see some cool threads when I get back. Stay true. :heart:
     
    #80 Zazie, Sep 22, 2005
    Last edited by moderator lumineux: Sep 22, 2005

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