From Radical To Mainstream

Discussion in 'Designers and Collections' started by Scott, Apr 1, 2004.

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  1. Scott

    Scott Stitch:the Hand

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    Interesting article,I saw on fashionunited.co.uk,about the state of independents in fashion right now.



    If that's not enough,I have already heard that so many including Dirk Van Saene and Anna Heylen in Antwerp and the label of Bruce in NY(which I've always admired) are also having financial problems as well.
     
  2. kit

    kit New Member

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    I've JUST watched a report on GUCCI and PPR on financial tv and despite the spin put on numbers , the biggies like these and PRADA are also in financial straits , so it's no wonder that small enterprises , aesthetically valid but short on funds , like those you mention , are going to the wall .

    And VOGUE UK finds the time to report Tom Ford's glitzy night on Rodeo Drive , and ignores the plight of those designers that represent the future NOT the past .

    KIT :cry:
     
  3. faust

    faust New Member

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    I used to blame the big corporations, the media, and all the usual suspects for the inane and vulgar pop-culture that we are presented with. But then my focus shifted. If you dig deep enough, it will always come back to the ordinary people. Each one of us has a CHOICE in most of our decisions in life, and in ALL of our decisions concerning culture (I will include fashion in culture, just to speak on a broader scale). Yes, the scale of choosing is tipped, sometimes lightly, sometimes heavily by anything starting from the quality of education, social pressure, the media, peers, etc... But you know what, noone is twisting anyone's arm. So, naturally, it is the general public to blame for seeing stupid hollywood movies, listening to bland pop, and succumbing to trends. The $ is the ultimate power, and if the masses choose to WILLINGLY enrich the shareholders of the Gucci Group, then it'll be a much harder choice for the executives of the Gucci Group say, "Well, we've really been turning out vulgar, uninspired clothing, and not of the quality that justifies the prices - let's appeal to our inner consience and hire talented young designers that will make better clothes, or let's sponsor some of them," than for an average consumer to say, "You know what, I am a confident, intelligent, independent person - I want to buy what I really like, and I don't need Vogue to tell me what it is".
     
  4. Mutterlein

    Mutterlein Active Member

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    I have found myself becoming more disgruntled with major labels mainly because their clothes is so exspensive and unattainable. I am more interested in smaller, individual designers like Raf Simmons and Martin Margiela that are still big names but not as weighted down as say...Helmut Lang.
     
  5. Scott

    Scott Stitch:the Hand

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    I agree wholeheartedly,Faust*

    I am such a big supporter of young or unknown designers,and if I had the money to spend on designer stuff,it would put forth toward those designers I truly have faith in. Most of which are the aformentioned.
     
  6. smashinfashion

    smashinfashion New Member

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    yes, well said faust. its not the big corporations fault if the masses cant think for themselves. unfortunately we, the ones with taste, are the ones who will suffer.
     
  7. Spacemiu

    Spacemiu New Member

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    Its very sad,, yes, but I do think that when there is less money its harder for young deisgners, in particular, to ceep going bccaus when people can onl dby 2 items insted of 3 or 4 they are going to by what is hot and what they know , not take a chance.

    doun't worrie its all going to be ok

    corprut empires are always trying to rule the world, but we can ceep a resitans.
     
  8. Atelier

    Atelier Hoppity Hop

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    If the masses are asses and the avant-garde by definition is at the periphery, why should the ground-breakers be economically successful? Where is that written?

    "Radical" has been done. Sure it can be done in different ways but it's been done. Actual wearers want wearable and regardless of what we see on the runway, that's what they get (e.g., Christian Dior) at the stores.

    This is the age of the internet and the time to cut out the middlemen. Make your clothes, price them without regard to what the "industry" says and sell your product to your customer (chinstroking or otherwise).

    Purists who aren't in it for the money (are there any?) aren't affected by the problem this article addresses.
     
  9. ignitioned32

    ignitioned32 Mannikin

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    I honestly believe in nourishing and supporting the avant-garde talents. I do so because these are the stars of tomorrow, these are the ones with real creativity and talent. Not to mention pushing the boundaries of clothing whether in form, material or the innovative way it can be used. :heart:
     
  10. Scott

    Scott Stitch:the Hand

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    Well with fashion these days no longer emphasising craft and quality, and many are complaining that's what they want, people are often deterred by the highgloss affects of the conglomerate. These designers we've mentioned-besides being creative-that's their main goal;to make a garmet that one will appreciate throughout one's life and possibly their offspring or otherwise. Its only up to the customer to decide what he or she wants--there is a melange of choices out there and if someone is as smart as they say,they will think for themselves....which doesn't seem to be happening. And these are the days,also,when a different,slightly more wearable sense of rebellion is occuring---how can one not see that? Do people equate character with being unwearable?

    This all being said,I'm not in total agreement with much of this article,either,since we are indeed in a time of economic crisis,and the fashion industry in reality isn't exactly in an abundance of shoppers these days. And as far as being radical.....it will never,ever go away. Die? No way,there's still many rebellious spirits out there who are doing quite well.
     
  11. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    If that's not enough,I have already heard that so many including Dirk Van Saene and Anna Heylen in Antwerp and the label of Bruce in NY(which I've always admired) are also having financial problems as well. [/quote]
    this is a very accurate description of why it is sooo difficult for young designers (smaller companies) right now...

    i'm glad that there's a consensus that things are changing...good to know i'm not the only one feeling the movement...it feels a little like walking on shaky ground...

    looking forward to the rebirth...

    ...bring on the revolution... :flower:
     
  12. Lena

    Lena etre soi-meme

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    'small' designers have been facing problems for a very long time now (two/three years) but the worst came up following the latest collections.

    with the rise of euro against the dollar most buyers cut off their 'indie' budgets.. so one can imagine how much more difficult the situation is right now.

    i completly agree on 'supporting' young talents by choosing 'indie' when spending money still, i feel young designers are also somehow responsible for the situation since they mainly follow mainstream marketing rules.

    they need to 'invent' a more 'guerrila' ways for approaching the market, one cannot beat big companies while playing the 'big companies game'

    my 2cents: alternative marketing and real fresh ideas in distribution and production could bring small business out of the red.

    there is hope, dont give up :flower:
     
  13. pennyfei

    pennyfei Member

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    don't have time to read all the replies above but i do want to say that it is very hard for "small" designers to survive in this industry. Fashion to many people are "unnecessary" or "frivolous" unless you are really into it and have the financial ability to afford it. It is already hard enough to start out your own business and it will get even harder as you try to let it grow and expand. Sorry, that's how tough this world is. Competition is merciless!
     
  14. Scott

    Scott Stitch:the Hand

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    Okay,I wanted to re-post because the original is much longer and more enlightening ;)


    The only part I don't agree with is that second to the last paragraph. Those qualities have always been associated with indie fashion particularly with Belgian designers. And as far as everything becoming pretty well,exuberance may be becoming more prolific as the seasons pass,darkness and melancholy is not completely dead. That's why its called emotion.
     
  15. purechris

    purechris no photos, no photos

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    Thanks for the full article Scott. Very interesting indeed. As it trickles down to the smaller stores we're starting to lose it to the majors and discounters. No matter the service you are able to provide, Americans want more of it at a cheaper price and faster.
     
  16. banana

    banana New Member

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    It really doesn't have much to do with what people want anymore but the amount of choice most people have. Very few people like to travel to buy clothes and if the mall is just around the corner people are going to choose mall brands.
     
  17. Scott

    Scott Stitch:the Hand

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    Well,I still feel a large part of the problem is the ignorance of the consumer. Generally people want everything so cheap and easy and hardly are ever willing to open their minds up. What's more,I'm not so sure about that "women are already satisfied" notion because they still seem to be shopping.
     
  18. pinkmonkey

    pinkmonkey New Member

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    Speaking of the Uk, I remember reading an article about The Pineal Eye (an avante garde boutique in London), in Drapers Record (UK trade press).

    The owner said it was almost impossible to survive as a business selling this type of clothing because the people who loved and wanted to own the clothing the most were also the ones who could afford it least - fashion students.

    I tend to agree. When I was a fashion student, I wanted to wear avante garde designers but could'nt afford the high prices (some of them were/are sky high IMHO).

    Now I'm earning the kind of money that means I can afford to buy, I'm not interested anymore as that kind of thing does look best on the very young. :lol:

    Ity must be very frustrating for the designers, and the stores!
     
  19. pinkmonkey

    pinkmonkey New Member

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    I don't think its necessarily ignorance, Scott. I love fashion and have a pretty good understanding of it as I work in the trade but I have other priorities when it comes to spending my money.

    Here in the UK its more fashionable to spend money on your home isn't it?

    I also remember an article in The Evening Standard where lifestyle researchers discovered that the young and affluent were making a conscious decision to spend their money on 'life experiences' such as adventure holidays, courses, motorcycles etc, instead of fashion.

    Me? I buy a bit of designer, mainly acessories, but more often than not I shop in charity shops and H & M.

    Have to say I find some prices of designer goods obscene. Ok, I can accept why couture cost as much as it does, but for instance theres a silk skirt with a frayed hem in this months Elle for £1500 :shock: They are literally having a laugh.
     
  20. banana

    banana New Member

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    I think people on this site tend to make generalizations about the middle classes. Sure there are the upper-middle classes that have large disposable incomes and who really should be finding better ways to spend their money. And then there are the other middle to lower income brackets that barely have enough to pay for their homes and who find that shopping for the clothing basics at the GAP is too expensive. How do you expect those people to drop $100-300 on a single item from an indie designer? Not everyone can live in Manhattan and shop at little fashion boutiques.
     

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