Making Samples ... What Fabrics to Use?

Discussion in 'Careers, Education & the Business of Fashion' started by awwwwfuq, Feb 26, 2009.

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  1. awwwwfuq

    awwwwfuq New Member

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    I just want to know how much are the cheapest rates for creating samples (patterns and construction) of dresses, blouses, skirts, and tanks. Also would it be smart to use cheap synthetic fabrics for the samples and then if a showroom is interested make it with the real fabrics like silk, etc.? Has anyone had experience getting picked up by a showroom? Was it hard? What do they like? What don't they like? Thanks!
     
  2. BetteT

    BetteT Mod Squad Team Leader

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    Wow ... you have a lot of questions about different topics, awwwwfuq! So I'm going to remane this thread to make it search friendly so that others will notice your topic.

    And I did a search for you and found some threads that might help you some:

    Ask about showrooms and what they look for, here: All About Showrooms and Sales Reps

    Ask about inexpensive sources for fabrics here: Sources for Fabrics / Textiles / Trimmings / Notions / Findings, Etc.?

    More information about Fabrics, but probably not cheap fabric: All about Textiles / Fabrics: Specifications, Fabric Treatments, Dyeing, Etc.
     
  3. gius

    gius chat~

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    I've always made samples the way the finished product is intended to be.
    I would not use polyester if the design demands wool. Maybe from appearance it will look the same, but what happens when it is worn, touched by hand, draped? It will be different since the fabrics are different.
    It will anyway let you be sure you can afford the fabric it will be produced in.
     
  4. awwwwfuq

    awwwwfuq New Member

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    It's just I don't want to spend a fortune on making a collection that might not even be picked up. It's also just a sample though. Just for photographs.
     
  5. Feline

    Feline rock-chic

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    You could photograph your toiles, and send out swatches of your intended fabrics (with costings). If there is genuine interest, then you can make samples in the fabric.
     
  6. awwwwfuq

    awwwwfuq New Member

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    How do you price garments in the contemporary line? What is the markup from the cost of goods sold usually?
     
  7. gius

    gius chat~

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    What does contemporary line mean?
     
  8. awwwwfuq

    awwwwfuq New Member

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    You seriously don't know what a contemporary line is? Sorry it's just with the amount of posts you have I would think you would know. It's basically what's in in the Barney's Co-op department. It's not as pricey as Proenza Schouler, Balenciaga, etc. It's usually from $100 to $1000. It's designers like Alexander Wang, Vena Cava, etc.
     
  9. awwwwfuq

    awwwwfuq New Member

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    Oh yeah, what's the least number of looks can you get away with showing the showroom?
     
  10. BetteT

    BetteT Mod Squad Team Leader

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    Thanks for sharing that information. Just so you know, gius' expertise lies in the design of textiles and fabrics and how they work when used, more than designing a line of clothing (am I right, gius?). That's why he would not necessarily know this. And I've heard the term, but never really understood it either since it's not something that I need to know when I work ... Im a stylist ... not a fashion designer or a retailer. But I do know what Haute Couture is ... which is almost always mis-understood nowadays. ;)

    Please take your showroom questions to the thread I directed you to, above. Thanks!!
     
    #10 BetteT, Feb 26, 2009
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Feb 26, 2009
  11. gius

    gius chat~

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    Thank you Bette^ I was referring to my 'other' work :blush: the clothing company. We sell only online or at shows/boutiques and these aren't organised in categories like contemporary line etc.

    thanks for the explanation. Maybe diffusion lines are also in the contemporary line?
     
  12. BetteT

    BetteT Mod Squad Team Leader

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    I'm going to PM you, gius. I think this would be a good starting place for a new thread about terminoligy. And we can take this conversaion out of this thread, since we are veering off topic here. And leave this thread to be about fabrics for samples.
     
  13. daniellat

    daniellat Fashion Designer

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    i second gius's opinion about using the fabric you intend to use in your final product to make the samples. It may not get chosen but thats a risk you need to take. Sometimes the garments that look like basics are better sold if the fabric is pretty. If you have second thoughts about a piece of clothing you are not going to sell, rethink the design and the trends you are following, your target or possible buyers and the price range.
     
  14. educo

    educo Active Member

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    This is the formula that I learned:

    2x cost= wholesale ( this is the price you sell to stores)

    2x-3x wholesale= Retail (depending on the store that could go up 5/6 times!)
     
  15. educo

    educo Active Member

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    You should really get the book called, Fashion For Profit. Check amazon. It's REALLY thorough.
     
  16. tamtamj

    tamtamj New Member

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    Put yourself in the position of buyer. Buyers can't envision things if you tell them; they are not creative people (well, usually - there is always exception to the rule). Having said that, you'll be better with actual fabrics or at least similar. If you sell pure silk, you can get cheaper silk, but don't put polyester. If you want cotton twill, maybe denim is the substitute. Something that looks and feels similar to original fabric. And than, you can put swatches for different color or pattern. Samples should be like originals; you can change something inside garment like:inside button, zipper color, or lining. These are details that if replaced won't change the essence of your garment.
     
    #16 tamtamj, Jun 14, 2011
    Last edited by moderator tonton: Jun 14, 2011
  17. irresistable_loz

    irresistable_loz New Member

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    If you're making samples they should always be in the fabric that you end up producing the style in, because when a buyer sees a sample, they expect that is EXACTLY how the items will look like when they arrive in store.

    If you can't afford to have the sample sewn up in the correct fabric to begin with, how on earth are you going to be able to afford production? Usually the stores won't pay a cent until you're ready to ship (COD) at the very earliest, its VERY VERY rare to get a deposit down... Most stores want NET30 or more... not having to pay until 30 days after delivery... Something to think about :flower:
     

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