Old Is Everywhere, So A Charity Tries On The New

Discussion in 'Trend Spotting' started by stylegurrl, Nov 11, 2004.

  1. stylegurrl

    stylegurrl New Member

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  2. LolitaLuxe

    LolitaLuxe Vision of Paradise

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    so true :wacko:

    im an avid scavenger at charity/thrift shops. i cant find anything anymore....maybe once in a blue moon. i cant believe there were days when i would get a paper bag full of retro t's for 5 dollars! a bag full!! today, on melrose they range from 35-175 dollars!! :rolleyes: for WORN t shirts. sorry but if its over priced i will not buy it. it has to be WORTH it, like a very good find, but these days its getting ridiculous. levi's cords i saw the other day for 200. :huh: the days where i would find good 70's boots......all gone. hippy skirts.....nope. an actual vintage piece, dream on everything is gone in thriftland :o

    last time i "scored" was an 80's herve leger dress for 2 dollars :shock: it was like an amazing high :lol: thrifting is an addiction :cry: i cant believe there are people keener than me out there in charity shop land :angry: taking everything and over pricing it. :sick:

    but this sale sounds exciting !
     
  3. utopia

    utopia ingenue

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    no lolita, I don't think they ARE keener than you. :( they're just people who have been caught up in a trend. most of these people wouldn't have even considered shopping at a charity shop 5 years ago. :rolleyes:

    I hate this quote:
    what competition?? they're a charity!! they're not supposed to be competitive. somehow it seems really dishonest to me to see thrift stores marking up their prices just because they can. I know the money is for charity, but it still seems to defeat the purpose of what a thrift store really is - a place to buy someone else's old clothes. it's just as bad as topshop buying up cheap clothes at the street markets and then reselling them for 40, 50 pounds or more.

    I, too, remember the days when I could go thrifting and come out with a bag full of vintage givenchy and beautifully crafted coats for $3 or $4 each. the shopworkers didn't know nor did they care about the labels. they just priced them according to the catagory they belonged in.
    I'm just glad that I still have a couple of secret places places back home that still haven't been discovered by the fashion vultures. :shifty:
     
  4. As You Like It

    As You Like It Proponent of Plaid

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    I can still do marvelously at thrifting, but I don't look for secondhand designer stuff. Just good secondhand clothes, any make, so long as it is my size and color.

    I've got tons of kickass vintage, and a lot of it has tags from Sears Junior Botique and J.C. Penny's Junior Bazaar.

    Mass-market clothing used to be a lot better made than it is now, and you can see the hallmarks of quality construction in these old garments; plaids that match across seamlines, fitted full-linings, piped seams on delicate fabrics, and sufficient seam-allowance for alterations, if necessary.

    So if your high-end thrift-shops have gotten too pricey or picked over, I highly suggest coming to a less-ritzy area of town and seeing what you can find. I can almost promise you that you will find stuff you like, and you can come out with plenty-o-goods for just a little cash.

    [​IMG]
    J. C. Penny Junior Bazaar, folks. $12 at the Disabled American Veterans' shop. 100% wool, and freakin' awesome. Plus, I am always glad to support the DAV.
     
  5. purechris

    purechris no photos, no photos

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    thanks for the article Stylegrrl :flower:
    I've always been a thrifter. I still find good stuff for cheap. You just have to circulate often. Like the article says, some people shop 3 times a week. I hit the stores once a week on my day off.
    I've always been fascinated by the process that takes place behind the scenes. I have thought many a time about volunteering, but would probably be obsessive about the way the merchandise was put out.
     
  6. utopia

    utopia ingenue

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    I completely agree. some of my nicest vintage stuff is no-name labels, and they are cut beautifully. besides the construction techniques you pointed out, there is also a difference in the quality of fabric that is so desirable. it's interesting that a vintage woollen sweater often holds up better than a woollen sweater that's only one year old - and I speak this from experience. :innocent:

    though I've noticed a lot of the vintage shops are catching on to this and re-pricing even sears and j.c. penny vintage so that it's ridiculously expensive. :(

    I still do quite well thrifting, if I go to my select few undiscovered hole-in-the-wall thrift shops, which are in the less nice parts of town. I'd much rather support the poorer, less visited establishments anyway. their charities need money just as much as the big-time charities. when I'm at home in the states I thrift usually 1 - 3 times a week, so the little old ladies at the shops know me too, which is nice. ^_^
     
  7. tiffany

    tiffany Active Member

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    I completely agree with you :flower:
     
  8. maskedmannequin

    maskedmannequin New Member

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    I volunteered a few years ago...what basically happens is that, things are donated and there's a store of bags full of clothing.
    There are a few volunteers in a back room who open the bags and sort though the clothes. There's a (large!) place for garments that wouldn't sell-either because they are REALLY not nice/awful quality or because they are stained-underarm, crotch stains.. which was kinda not nice to learn!! Heh! Luckily none of those while I was there.
    The garments that can't be sold (excluding electrical items which can't for legal reasons) are then put into a big "bin" which is sent off to be "ragged"-basically sent to be made into things like the stuffing for aeroplane seats as said in the article.
    The rest is then pressed,ironed or steamed if needs be (we had a steamer) and put out onto the shop floor.
    That's basically it!
    Oh and there are certain prices that are allowed to be put on...and you have to gauge which price needs to be put on :smile:!
    Nothing exciting!
     
  9. oceanharlot

    oceanharlot stories everywhere

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    I find the best vintage stuff at OFF vintage places. ie. Not Salvation Army or Goodwill or vintage stores.

    Lately... I've been going garage saling. its the ultimate treasure hunt. such an adrenaline rush when you find something amazing among the piles of Bazaar, Jordache and Two Lips... I found an Hermes scarf a few months ago. Still reeling.
     
  10. kealoha

    kealoha New Member

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    i love thrifting & have really scored over the past 3 months. lots of gently used designer stuff, but fabulous vintage pieces too.
     
  11. snickerdoodles

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    I find better vintage stuff and at better prices on ebay than I do in regular thrift shops. Living in big cities where vintage is popular sucks - every place is picked over so that there's nothing left and that what is left is terribly over-priced.
     

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