On Fashion Shows

Discussion in 'Designers and Collections' started by softgrey, Jun 16, 2004.

  1. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    WWD-You have always maintained that theatrical shows are meaningless. Why is that-and what's the future of fashion shows?

    ARMANI- Fashion shows are the only tool to move your audience, a group made up of friends, VIP's, the press and buyers. It's a first impact, and the 110 looks that come down the runway sum up the essence of the season. It's a spectacle that has to have follow-thru at retail. [Bernard] Arnault once said to me that [John] Galliano's clothes may not make commercial sense, but that his China theme increased the sale of cosmetics. That's a different story. Galliano is great at inventing images that don't exist in ordinary life but which have great impact on the runway. These are two different realities that shouldn't be put on the same level. Someone like me has fewer elements to work with-the models, the lighting, the music-because I think in terms of sales. I want to sell clothes...not cosmetics.


    :innocent:
     
  2. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    Galliano cut loose with a signature collection that rivaled his crazy cardboard cutout collection a few years back. On editor described his fall look--blending giant hoop skirts, cutlery-adorned hair, and tight jackets--as "Aunt Jemima hobo meets Cold Mountain". Whille his over-the-top antics may have caused some fashion followers to reach the overstimulation point, Galliano defends the theatrical approach.

    "There's nothing wrong with being creative as long as you've got the business acumen to go along with it", he says. "Without creativity, how can you possible produce or design anything that is remotely appealing to consumers?" While he acknowledges the "collective mood" in fashion that seems to prize safe and ladyllke styles, Galliano wants no part of it. "I've always done what i believe in," he insists. "The concept is that we can do a show that can be totally creative and totally inspired and then we interpret it [into wearable styles]. To me, that's the only way to work. You have to do that to end up with something interesting and seductive that someone will want to wear."



    *fact...ready-to-wear slaes at dior are up about 30% so far in 2004
     
  3. Scott

    Scott Stitch:the Hand

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    I actually agree with him on that. Of course,there are alot of designers out there capable of doing really creative presentations whilst still keeping the clothes in relevance. What Galliano does,is merely a big marketing scheme that really has absolutely nothing to do with his actual job.
     
  4. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    see other thread ...galliano on fashion shows... :innocent:
     
  5. Scott

    Scott Stitch:the Hand

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    30%? Are you serious?? I can't imagine how....

    And why does he say "business acumen"? Not everybody has to put on the sort of outlandish spectacles he does in order to achieve a highly creative presentation.
     
  6. Atelier

    Atelier Hoppity Hop

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    Did Mr. Armani answer the question?

    Is he saying theatrics are okay as long as they are for the purpose of selling clothes or that theatrics for other purposes (like selling cosmetics) are okay, it's just that it's not his style.

    I think the elite designers benefit from each other's theatrics. It spreads out beyond the individual fashion show and raises interest in the Big Four fashion weeks and beyond. Anyone know what that economics term is for shared public goods giving marginal benefits?
     
  7. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    :unsure: ...um...no...

    i think armani is being gracious in his answer...he's saying that the spectacle works for some...but not for him...and using galliano as his example...

    i think it was an outstanding comparison...makes a lot of sense from a business point of view...no?...
     
  8. Lena

    Lena etre soi-meme

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    sales are up at Dior, but not from pap...
    it's mainly bags , accesories and .. couture ;)

    thanks for posting softgrey :flower:
     
  9. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    i think he' referring to the ability to translate the creativity into more wearable and marketable designs...

    you have to admit that the best thing about these shows is the make-up...and boy do they sell A LOT of cosmetics...right?...business acumen... :flower:

    i'm shocked at the increase as well...but it's a bit deceiving seeing as all retail has been down so low for a couple of years... :innocent:
     
  10. mikeijames

    mikeijames no tom ford, no thanks.

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    i'm sorry that answer was very apologetic and sugar coated....armani does have a line of cosmetics and several fragrances...he simply doesn't use his runway presentations as image vehicles for the entire brand-base like dior does.

    on the other hand, if dior made as much money as armani did on clothing i don't think we would see the same outrageousness on runway (mainly because we would have absolutely no idea what to flock to the stores and buy)...i see nautical draw string pants on armani's runway, i'm calling my girl at armani and pre-ordering...not the same at dior, you actually have to wait until the stuff hits the store before deciding on clothes.

    but, i feel sorry for galliano in one respect, i think that early on in his tenure at dior, the shows were still wild and different but the clothes translated a lot easier into tangible accessible fashion...these days, it's just a circus.

    (this picture is from his spring 98 haute couture show: a wonderful dress despite the glittery presentation)
     
  11. Atelier

    Atelier Hoppity Hop

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    This reminds me of his juicier quote from his New Yorker interview a couple of years ago:

     
  12. Lena

    Lena etre soi-meme

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    one needs to be a hell of a 'strange' guy to feel attracted to Galliano's show girls...
    could you feel erotic towards this 'thing' here :blink: ?

    now, really :rolleyes:
     
  13. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    from wwd-
    YOUR AD HERE
    As cash-strapped designers turn to sponsors for funding, New York's runways are suddenly awash in advertising.

    insurance policies. atms. birth control patches. carefree perfect fit panty liners. Not to mentions deivery sevices, cameras, cell phones, furniture, coffee, doughnuts, cigarettes, tabloids, airlines, and liquor from dewar's to veuve cliquot.

    What all this has to do with you, dear follower of fashion, comes down to one constant among fashiondom's runways: the cold, hard cash required to put on a show. The marketing departments behind these products have caught on to the fact that the celebrity- and supermodel-studded world of fashion shows draws global attention. Why not, then, hitch their wagons to the rising stars of designers in exchange for sound bites, signage, or placement in a goodie bag?

    It's been a pretty good deal for the designers, many of whom would not be able to afford the twice-annual shows if they had to foot the entire bill--which starts at $35,000 to $50,000 (provided the models work for trade) but can run upweard of $200,000 for even a modest productioin, compared to the $1 million-plus spectacle put on by the megabrands.


    **in case anyone was wondering how much a runway show costs and how designers pay for them... :flower:
     
  14. mikeijames

    mikeijames no tom ford, no thanks.

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    This reminds me of his juicier quote from his New Yorker interview a couple of years ago:

    [/b][/quote]
    i don't get that visceral raw reaction from dior anymore (at one point...most definitely)...i am actually turned off by the woman he puts on runway. (yes, i know the power of a dior dress in store, but he's presentations don't show that woman anymore). the women on dior's runways lately have been an homage to cartoonish drag more than unapproachable vamp. i see something like what was on the runway for fall approaching me...i'm running from not toward :shock:
     
  15. mikeijames

    mikeijames no tom ford, no thanks.

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    you beat me to the punch, lena :boxer:
     
  16. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    :eek: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:


    omg...lmao... :woot:
     
  17. Scott

    Scott Stitch:the Hand

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    :rofl: :lol:

    Whatever floats ones boat,I suppose :p
     
  18. mikeijames

    mikeijames no tom ford, no thanks.

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    i seriously think that in the next two to three years we will see a paring back of the big-budget presentations.
     
  19. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    lena ...i've got it right in front of me and Sidney Toledano, Dior president is claiming "ready-to-wear sales up about 30% so far in 2004."

    I'm just quoting the article...

    he says the same about chloe.... :flower:
     
  20. Lena

    Lena etre soi-meme

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    true Mikeijames, huge show productions are not the thing to do anymore.
    alternative stagings (see Perry Ellis), videos, projections and 'intimate' presentations are much more modern outlining the look of things to come.

    regarding the advertising situation, there are designer houses that make much more out of their shows sponsoring than for three months of sales :innocent:

    of course it sounds crazy, but its true, selling fashion by the show :lol:

    *softgrey, are all these quotes from older issues of wwd?
    because i havent seen anything on this at today's issue :unsure:
     

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