Peter Dundas Exits Roberto Cavalli Group

Discussion in 'Designers and Collections' started by Benn98, Oct 12, 2016.

  1. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Source: http://wwd.com/fashion-news/designer-luxury/peter-dundas-exits-roberto-cavalli-10673755/
     
  2. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    The musical chairs continues!!

    Yikes, what's happening to this industry!! :shock:
    Purely from a superficial perspective, to me it looks like brands are as complicit as young designers. Where's the loyalty where brands used to back their creative heads even through bad patches?? Seems like this is a thing of the past now.
     
  3. dodencebt

    dodencebt Well-Known Member

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    Oh come on!
     
  4. Miss Dalloway

    Miss Dalloway Well-Known Member

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    Whoa! What an insane year for Fashion, and in general this is! I thought he was a perfect match at Cavalli!
     
  5. Nymphaea

    Nymphaea Well-Known Member

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    It was apparent that Peter wasn't successful at Cavalli, he was much better at Pucci.
    The fashion industry is becoming more and more fickle, loyalty isn't much around any more. Money is driving this insanity, the big bosses wanting the gold pot at the end of the rainbow and it seems like it's killing creativity unfortunately.
     
  6. Marc10

    Marc10 Moderator

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    Well this one was a very justifiable exit. He was an absolute disaster, and I guess the sales numbers have been that bad to make them kick him out so quickly.
     
  7. dsamg

    dsamg Well-Known Member

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    True, but you cannot expect loyalty when it is a private equity acquisition. Their investment horizon is very short and they generally have about 5 years to turn around a company. If the results are not well above equity market return, it puts the future of the entire fund at risk. It is a very competitive industry. As an investment banker, I hate to put my finance-brained perspective on what should be a creative-minded process, but the pressures on designers at PE owned houses are higher than those on the designers at LVMH, who can afford to wait a little bit longer for results. When you have 5 years to deliver excellence, either the designer delivers quickly or they are out.
     
  8. Scotty

    Scotty Well-Known Member

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    OMG. The scream i let out, i am shook.

    He was perfect for Cavalli even though he wasn't doing what he should've been. If only he had done what he was doing at Pucci.

    That was shorter than his job at Ungaro. :wacko:
     
    #8 Scotty, Oct 12, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Thefrenchy: Oct 12, 2016
  9. anlabe32

    anlabe32 Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that was fast. I feel sorry for him but to be honest I never liked his work, not at Pucci nor at Cavalli.

    Interesting to see who will end up at Cavalli and where Peter will go..
     
  10. Lola701

    Lola701 Well-Known Member

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    We can't say that he did wonderful things at Cavalli. He should have kept the energy of his first show.

    It's weird but i was thinking about how if Vaccarello is a fail at Saint Laurent, Dundas could take over. And here now, this news comes.

    I'm sorry but it was expected. Everybody wants their Hedi Slimane "revolution". I don't know how Pucci is doing but i believe their designer will leave.
    I think Cavalli should stop with all those diffusion lines.

    I can't wait to see what's next for Dundas.
     
  11. VogueDisciple93

    VogueDisciple93 Active Member

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    The turn around was quick, but I am not surprised they are parting ways. Revenues of $200 million is really not enough prop up a brand like Cavalli and its size, and to be very honest Dundas was not showing anything that would help improve that. I was excited for his appointment here because I believed he was perfect to succeed Roberto, but his collections since have been utterly unappealing and the marketing has been wanting.

    I do believe the company needs to cut some of the auxiliary brands under the Cavalli name and focus on the main line and Just Cavalli, if they decide to keep it - I noticed that there was not a collection for Spring 2016 or 2017. The harsh reality is Roberto Cavalli's market and clientele is aging out as majority of the women that donned their slinky dresses are no longer interested in that and they are not bringing in the younger audience. Also Cavalli is seen as tacky, with people I know anyway, and Dundas only doubled down on that. Dundas' collections were also too close to Michele's Gucci. Yes Gucci does not OWN that 70s, DIY aesthetic but with their current mammoth marketing and celebrity drive they may as well do. Seeing Dundas' Cavalli out in the wild with its bronzed snake buckles, romantic ruffles, flora and fauna patches would lead me to think it was Gucci and I would then make my way to their store if I liked something. This is coming from someone that immerses themselves in all things fashion so imagine what the less discerning general consumer would think.

    Roberto Cavalli needs a positive overall but Dundas was not doing that.
     
    #11 VogueDisciple93, Oct 12, 2016
    Last edited by moderator candy_girl82: Oct 12, 2016
  12. ThatGuyPaul

    ThatGuyPaul Member

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    Peter Dundas was the perfect fit for Cavalli
     
  13. GivenchyHomme

    GivenchyHomme Well-Known Member

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    It wasn't honest and it wasn't modern. It was Dundas pretending to be Cavalli. The first collection was an absolute disaster and the collections that followed were poor Cavalli copycats. He didn't bring enough of himself to the brand. Pucci was a hit and now look at it. What a terrible decision Dundas made. The same thing happened to Marco Zanini at Rochas. He tried to move to another brand and ended up leaving after a short period. Look at Rochas now. It's completely irrelevant and so is Pucci. It's sad what's happening to these smaller houses. Was the money really that good to turn your back on a loyal consumer base?
     
  14. MyNameIs

    MyNameIs Well-Known Member

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    He should've never left Pucci. That was a good combination for both him and the brand. Now Pucci is a mess and he's out of a job. Though to be fair, I did think him going to Cavalli was a promising combination at the time. It just so happened that it turned out to be an absolute disaster. Not sure why. I wonder if it was because he was trying to click too many boxes at once - on trend, following the Cavalli footsteps, bring something of his own, etc. Maybe he should've just focused on one thing.
     
  15. dodencebt

    dodencebt Well-Known Member

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    businessoffashion.com
     
  16. Zposen

    Zposen Well-Known Member

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    I can see them trying to lure Olivier Rousteing from Balmain.... I mean look what he did for Balmain sales...
     
  17. vetements

    vetements Member

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    I would think a good part of Latin America, Spain, Italy and inner cities of US buys Cavalli and it is generally popular globally than say a brand like Celine, but guess either this is not the case or somewhere along the equation something is wrong...sad, since I like Dundas at Pucci very much and his aesthetics in general, in your face sexy but not cheap. Who competes with Cavalli anyways? Versace? Dolce and Gabbana? Not exactly too...

    Wonder where he will go next but wishing him all the best nonetheless.
     
  18. reese06

    reese06 Well-Known Member

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    What was so interesting is that he had a hand in what were some of Cavalli's most memorable and recognizable collections in the early 2000s and then his latest stint at the brand was a complete disaster.

    I honestly thought he was going to pretty much bring what he did at Pucci to Cavalli. Or at least, that seemed like what they hired him to do but his collections were cheap and sometimes just downright ugly. There's no one really filling the luxe, jet set, bohemian sex bomb niche that he left behind.
     
  19. narcyza

    narcyza Active Member

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    He was perfect for Pucci. Please come back Peter.
     
  20. Lola701

    Lola701 Well-Known Member

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    Frida Giannini is unemployed, she has a star power and a star following, she can create a It Bag and sellable sexy dresses.

    There's something frustrating about the state of fashion today. We have a lot of star-unemployed-designers (Frida, Stefano, Alber, Peter...etc.) who are very talented and can do wonders at any fashion houses BUT who doesn't have that extra thing to stand by their own.
    Their talents needs to be support by big brands, big budgets and a lot of power.

    Ronald Van Der Kemp can also deliver a good Cavalli.

    We are at a time when people are coming back to wanting to sell clothes. I mean, dundas did some great individual pieces (shirts, pants, dresses) but those clothes did not stand out in the Gucci wave.

    The irony behind this is that Dundas's first collections for Cavalli looked very Saint Laurent. Now, Hedi is gone and Saint Laurent will not look like what it used to be and Cavalli is just there. Dundas had the opportunity to own the sexy sellable and bankable look.

    His Cavalli was too confused. Very bohemian vintage on the runway, very ethereal and edgy on campaigns and very sexy and traditional on Beyonce and celebrities.
     

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