The Business of Magazines #4

Discussion in 'Magazines' started by Thread Manager, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Condé Nast Britain Unlocks May Issues, Offers Free Digital Access

    Samantha Conti

    FREE FOR ALL: Condé Nast Britain is hoping to light up the dark days of quarantine by unlocking content, and offering free digital access to the May issues of its glossy titles, WWD has learned.

    Readers will be able to swipe and read the British digital editions of Vogue, GQ, Vanity Fair, Tatler, House & Garden, World of Interiors, Wired, Glamour and Condé Nast Traveller for free, and access them from each brand’s web site. The titles will start dropping on April 2 with Tatler and Condé Nast Traveller, followed by Vogue a day later and the other titles to follow.

    Albert Read, managing director of Condé Nast Britain, said with free digital editions of the May issues, the company “is looking to give our readers something extra that will entertain, inspire, lift spirits, and move them during the days ahead.”

    British Vogue is also set to reveal its May cover: Rihanna. She is wearing a durag, and it’s the first time the headscarf has appeared on the cover of Vogue. The durag was designed by Stephen Jones Millinery.

    In his editor’s letter, Edward Enninful says: “Did I ever imagine…that I would see a durag on the cover of Vogue? No, reader, I did not. Although this potent symbol of black life — of self-preservation, resistance and authenticity — has an important place in popular culture, it is rarely viewed through the prism of high fashion.

    “Yet here we have the most fabulous, aspirational and beautiful durag. How exciting. It takes a person of extraordinary charisma to pull off such a moment. Step forward Rihanna, a woman I am lucky enough to count among my closest creative collaborators, and who I could also call my ultimate muse.”

    Rihanna was last on the cover of British Vogue in 2018, and it was the second most successful newsstand cover after last September’s edition of the title, which was co-edited by Meghan Markle.

    Rihanna wears the black durag for both covers of the May Vogue, and both were shot by Steven Klein. On the newsstand cover, she’s wearing a white Burberry ensemble, and feather boa by MacCulloch & Wallis. On the subscriber cover she has a gothic style “truth” tattoo stamped across her eyes and is wearing a Maison Margiela Artisanal by John Galliano jacket, and necklaces by Chrome Hearts and Laura Cantu.

    According to Enninful, the durag was Rihanna’s suggestion, while the shoot was inspired by Buffalo style — Ray Petri’s Eighties British fashion movement. The name referenced Bob Marley’s song “Buffalo Soldier.”

    Earlier this month, Condé Nast Italy announced it was offering digital copies of all its titles for free for the next three months. Starting from March 13, readers have been able to access Condé Nast’s content and browse the digital pages of titles including Vogue, GQ, Wired, AD, La Cucina Italiana and Condé Nast Traveller.

    source | wwd
     
  2. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Coronavirus Pressure on Media Spreads From Alt-Weeklies to Digital News Outlets, Magazines

    BuzzFeed has implemented a company-wide pay cut, W Magazine has furloughed a number of staffers and worse could come.

    Kathryn Hopkins

    The first signs that an already fragile media industry was starting to buckle under the pressure of a global pandemic appeared at alternative weeklies across the U.S.

    From Seattle’s The Stranger to St. Louis’s Riverfront Times, a plethora of alt-weeklies have been forced to lay off staff or suspend print editions as they struggle to tread water amid plunging advertising revenues as their biggest clients — local restaurants, bars, retail and festivals — temporarily shut up shop.

    Now the cracks are starting to spread from those to national digital news organizations and magazines, some of which are having to take drastic measures to keep the lights on.

    Just last week, BuzzFeed, whose news arm has been without an editor in chief ever since Ben Smith jumped ship to join The New York Times, sent an e-mail to staffers informing them that they would have to swallow a pay cut for at least April and May, with the situation being reviewed on a monthly basis.

    The cuts will be graduated, ranging from 5 percent for those earning less than $64,900 and as much as 25 percent for the company’s top earners.

    “It is clear that in the short term, the economy will see a steep rise in unemployment, a drop in wages, and perhaps deflation where cash becomes more valuable and assets decline,” founder and chief executive officer Jonah Peretti, who plans to waive his salary during this time, said in a memo to staff.

    “It is difficult to forecast in the midst of a crisis, but we are already seeing these dynamics. In our own business we want to save as many jobs as possible, even at the expense of wages declining,” he added. “We don’t know how long this will last but we want to move quickly to make sure our business remains sustainable and we will lift the program and reevaluate if things improve.”

    BuzzFeed, like other media organizations, is grappling with the fact that it is witnessing a surge in engagement in COVID-19 stories, at a time when advertising revenues are sliding as companies across the board slash budgets. Adding to these industrywide woes, BuzzFeed News reported Friday that a major brand stopped their ads from appearing on COVID-19 content at major news outlets’ sites in March, acting as a further drag on revenue.

    But even before the crisis exploded and large parts of the country effectively shut down, media outlets were feeling the pressure. The New York Times’ ceo Mark Thompson predicted at the beginning of this month that digital advertising revenue would fall 10 percent this quarter amid coronavirus-related “uncertainty and anxiety” among advertisers.

    It’s a similar story in the already struggling glossy fashion magazine world, where W Magazine appears to be the first casualty as pull back in the luxury industry proved too much for the title. According to reports, some print staff, who were already working from home, have been furloughed, and the online team is on reduced salaries.

    A spokesman for new owner Future Media Group, which acquired W magazine from Condé Nast last summer, confirmed the furloughs, but did not comment further.

    The extent of W’s troubles emerged exactly a week after Playboy revealed that it would cease print editions as the economic disruptions from COVID-19 were too much for its already strained print operations to bear, while on Saturday American Media, the already wavering celebrity news and gossip publisher, told staffers know they were getting a considerable reduction in pay.

    And worse could come. In addition to a feared advertising slump and slide in newsstand sales, magazines could have trouble filling their pages. For now, the days of huge fashion shoots are gone. True — some shoots are still happening, with only a skeleton staff, but if the government introduces more stringent rules, these could stop altogether. Even sending and receiving outfits for shoots is becoming more difficult to do; as the days go on major fashion houses in Europe and the U.S. are all shuttered with staff working from home, and factories in Italy are also closed.

    There will, of course, be shoots in the bank, but if the crisis drags on, they will no doubt start to dry up and some high-fashion lifestyle features could come across as tone deaf as millions of people across the U.S. lose their jobs.

    “Right now you can’t go out and do the kind of on-the-scene reporting and photography that you would like to do,” said Dan Kennedy, a journalism professor at Northeastern. “That’s going to be damaging.”

    He used the example of local TV news broadcasters to show how what is happening there is reflective of the whole media industry. “Local TV news, like magazines, like anything, is so dependent on the visual element and what we’ve been looking at is reporters coming in by Zoom from their kitchen and B-roll consisting of footage they got months earlier of various things that they’re covering. It just isn’t visually interesting, although obviously they’re doing the best that they can,” he added. “This is going to be the same challenge facing any media outlet that is dependent on visuals and certainly a fashion magazine is more dependent on visuals than most, for sure.”

    To date, the big three magazine publishers (Condé, Hearst Magazines and Meredith) have not unveiled any changes to their publishing schedules due to COVID-19. It’s understood, though, that executives at Hearst, which owns Harper’s Bazaar, Marie Claire, Town & Country and Cosmopolitan, have been building COVID-19 contingency plans. It was reported this week that Hearst-owned men’s magazine Esquire had quietly reduced its print frequency issues from eight to six a year, but Hearst insisted this decision was made before the COVID-19 crisis exploded.

    Doug Olson, president of Meredith Magazines, publisher of People and InStyle, recently told WWD that while the company has not made any changes to its publishing schedules, it, too, has a contingency plan in place if the situation worsens.

    “As a contingency, we went through and said if we have to pull back from a capacity standpoint what would we continue to print or how would we prioritize those things, so we’ve got all those plans in place,” he said. “Obviously, People would sit at the top of the list because it’s a weekly. So we would continue to focus on it and then it really depends on where we are at the close of these different issues what would be next.”

    Independent magazines, without a big company behind them, are likely to feel any pain more quickly.

    “I think that any independent media outlet that is unable to arrange for the financing that they need to get through the next few months is at risk,” Kennedy added.

    There is some assistance, though. Small businesses employing fewer than 1,000 people, including publishers, can apply for $349 billion earmarked for them as part of the $2.2 trillion bailout package approved last week, but only time will tell how much this will help.

    In a piece penned for Harvard University’s Nieman Lab, news industry analyst Ken Doctor, looked at whether this Small Business Administration lifeline could make a difference at least for local media.

    “Certainly, the size of a local news enterprise determines how far hundreds of thousands of dollars can go. Certainly, though, no one can be sure,” he said. “Barring a major Easter surprise, no one expects this lost ad business to come back big or come back strong. But a million dollars buys one important thing for smaller companies: time.”

    source | wwd
     
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  3. Fiercification

    Fiercification Well-Known Member

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    One would hope that EICs, or just the print industry at large will wake up when the Covid pandemic is over and realise that they actually need to start publishing content that's worth their reader's time, and (shock horror) may take actual time, resources, effort and research to create (I suppose some written articles are still published with the above having been factored in, I don't really buy mags these days) in order to survive? I'm probably too optimistic. But this is really the last chance saloon now...(pick up the phone and call Meisel Anna :innocent:, just do it!)
     
  4. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    I've only just realised that if lockdown intensifies in the UK, and it's only a matter of time according to The Guardian, it may mean we'd only be able to buy hard copies from supermarkets because newsagents and bookstores will likely get the chop? Foreign magazines will be hard to come by, I'm sure even the ones from continental Europe. Meaning we'll be stuck with British monthlies.

    Word of advice, if your subscription is due for renewal soon, rather continue buying newsstand copies. The magazine may go bust and they're not obliged to refund you if that happens.
     
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  5. Srdjan

    Srdjan Well-Known Member

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    @Benn98 - distribution of foreign magazines has stopped last week here in Serbia, as the local distributor (covering Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia) was importing press through a bigger, Italian supplier who probably isn't operating at the moment. A bookstore lady told me this. So, yeah, it's very possible that this will happen elsewhere.

    I at least know a store that imports magazines directly from Britain, so I'll most likely be able to get me the upcoming issues that I wanted, but still, this is a nightmare.
     
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  6. Miss Dalloway

    Miss Dalloway Well-Known Member

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    God this sucks, i been waiting for certain issues to order from the CN store, but some have been really late, while others have arrived as usual. If DHL keeps working it will be able to order them like always, but things are getting worse by the day, so who knows.
     
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  7. Phuel

    Phuel Well-Known Member

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    This won’t happen.

    The industry will continue to market to the masses; and sadly— post-pandemic, the masses will likely be more conservative in how they perceive and accept high fashion. And you know, since HF has been so watered down to appease to the widest demographic of costumers as possible to maximized profit, greed will drive the fashion and publishing industry to even further water down HF to make up for the huge loss of revenues due to the global pandemic. (The current state of hyping and supporting mediocrity with gimmicks of "diversity/inclusivity "is so frighteningly on point with Kurt Vonnegut’s vision of an utopian/dystopian— depending on whether you’re for mass mediocrity or for only the highest of standards, where the superiorly physical and mentally-supreme have to dumb-down to the lessers all in the name of equality and humanity. This is where we are as a society now.

    And people who are used to a rarified, privileged and plush way of life as these editors/CEOS of brands are, will not give up their financial status. Look at the commoners whom are whining and crying about being “prisoners at home” mentality: Apparently, giving up their social life and not being able to take their kids to soccer finals is “the worst thing to have happened to them”… If this is how the masses are taking this current event, the rarified rich will double-down on the watering down of creativity and risk-taking when we’re able to return to being productive (hopefully) soon. But one thing I’m certain of: This 12-issues a year pattern isn’t relevant anymore deep deep in today’s digital age. It’s only pure corporate greed that has them stubbornly latching and leaching off this rotting schedule of a corpse. It’s amazing how this incredibly phoney industry continue to preach “sustainability” all the while blatantly continue to churn out more garbage (in both excessive waste of fabrics and paper) than ever before. Instead of downsizing and streamline and focusing on progressing and innovating creativity, they are even more bloated and wasteful than ever with the same old same old basics.
     
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  8. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    How Are Independent Magazines Navigating COVID-19?
    Publishers are postponing release dates, suspending print runs, and focusing on online in order to engage with readers.


    By Tianwei Zhang on April 6, 2020

    LONDON — Independent fashion publications are facing a series of problems amid the coronavirus outbreak: Shoots have been canceled, advertisers are pulling out, production costs are surging and international shipping blockages are forcing publishers around the globe to pivot and act creatively in order to connect with readers.

    In the U.K., Dazed Media is offering the April issue of Dazed and the spring/summer issue of Another Man free to download “as a small gift to our readers.” It has also launched a digital campaign #AloneTogether on Dazed that invites homebound audiences worldwide “to take part in an open movement that uses creativity to celebrate community in the face of isolation,” according to Jefferson Hack, chief executive officer and cofounder of Dazed Media.

    Another has introduced the #CultureIsNotCancelled campaign, which urges people and organizations alike to practice social distancing, and still keep culture alive.

    “We will be supporting the creative industries by showcasing otherwise postponed or canceled projects, from fashion collections to exhibitions, films and much more. Culture must be protected and projected in the bedrooms of every home to give hope and humanity in a time crisis. The importance of digital media in doing this cannot be underestimated,” Hack said.

    Dazed will also suspend the print edition of its summer issue and, instead, create a special digital moment with contributions from readers and its creative community around the world.

    “We are learning to adapt, connecting with each other via Zoom and our audiences as much as possible to ensure we can act and react in meaningful ways. It is important for Dazed to document this time — not to reflect it, but to help shape positive future narratives around culture and society in light of the crisis,” added Hack.

    On Sunday, Hack penned an open letter to members of the British fashion industry, entreating them “to save our creative fashion workforce and save our national identity.” He urged people to support the BFC Foundation Fashion Fund , “which I am hoping our government will prioritize for urgent financing.”

    As part of his call to action, Hack cited BFC research showing that 35 percent of young designers in the U.K. “will not make it past the next three months, and over half of the industry could be wiped out by the end of the year, including the livelihoods of many creative freelance individuals – the photographers, stylists, hair stylists, make-up artists, art directors, the tailors and the young creatives who are the very essence of our country’s creative production; its life and soul. alongside the humanitarian crisis, we must also recognize the very real economic crisis that has put our creative industries on a cliff-edge for survival.”

    I-D is releasing a similar project to Dazed in the coming week. Its parent company Vice introduced a pay cut last week for many employees for the next 90 days. Executives will see their pay reduced by 25 percent, with ceo Nancy Dubuc taking a 50 percent cut.

    As reported, Vice staffers taking home $125,000 will have to endure a 20 percent cut and also work a four-day week while those making between $100,000 and $120,000 face a 10 percent cut The i-D editorial team in London has not yet been impacted by the pay cut, because of the generally lower salaries in the U.K.

    Condé Nast’s Love magazine, meanwhile, has seen a 41 percent surge in unique online users and a 94 percent jump in social media engagement over the past week, as it presented its own lockdown initiative #LOVEIN, featuring an exclusive interview with Rita Ora on how she is coping with loneliness during self-isolation. There is also Matty Bovan whipping up the perfect chocolate soufflé at Bistrotheque; New York celebrity personal trainer Korey Rowe’s workout routine, and Mei Kawajiri, Bella Hadid’s favorite nail artist, creating custom nails art daily for the publication.

    “Love hopes to offer some respite from the horrendous developments we are all experiencing, actively working remotely to present colorful and upbeat content to enrich their audience,” said a magazine spokesperson. Meanwhile, British and Italian editions of Condé Nast titles are offering free digital access to the May issues.

    The biannual magazine A Magazine Curated By, which has collaborated with Pierpaolo Piccioli, Kim Jones and Simone Rocha on recent issues, wrapped the production of its latest issue just days before quarantine measures and forced confinement came into effect across Europe. With the help of screen-sharing applications, it managed to finish graphic design, and layouts, and slowly put the pages together with team members in France, Germany, Italy and Canada all working from home.

    Dan Thawley, editor in chief of the magazine, said: “Photography labs started closing down across the globe, and our contributors were racing to retouch images and process films in various cities. One was even the victim of price-gouging at a New York facility, which close to doubled their costs overnight knowing they were the only lab left open.”

    The magazine’s printing facility is in northern Italy, and it’s still operating during this quarantine period as it is considered an essential service. “Our print schedule did not change. Many of our museum boutiques will receive the magazine later, but we expect it to still have several good months of shelf life. We are unsure of how [the virus] will affect deliveries to other stores,” Thawley added.

    The team is now assessing ways of moving forward in the second half. “We are confident that both our creative and business models are agile enough to weather the economic repercussions of reduced advertising dollars and constrained production budgets. We remain hopeful that the logistics to mail out will remain an essential service. And to ensure that, we are preparing targeted digital partnerships to help support this launch,” said Blake Abbie, editor at large at A Magazine Curated By.

    Adriano Batista, editor in chief of the Barcelona-based men’s wear magazine F–king Young! said despite the fact that the title already had most stories produced before lockdown, it will have to hold the release of the new issue a bit longer as its design studio is closed. In the meantime, it has been producing interviews focusing on the recent situation for its web site.

    “We also depend on other factors that we can’t control, like distribution. Advertising will also be a big problem, not for this issue but for the next ones, because the brands are not selling like they used to sell before this crisis and we all depend on each other. It’s a full circle,” he said, adding that the magazine will try to focus more on sustainability and responsible consumption in future issues.

    For smaller titles, the lockdown has been particularly brutal. Wei Liu, editor in chief of The Wow, a London-based magazine celebrating Asian women, said he has had to postpone the upcoming issue until everything returns to normal.

    “I was informed our shoots, including the cover story, had been temporarily canceled or postponed since February due to the virus situation. And 80 percent of our shoots were initially scheduled in March and early April in New York and London, then the shutdown happened. My distributor also told me most of the shops were closed because the government decided that magazines were not an essential product,” he said.

    “As a new, independent magazine without any advertiser, the production budget has always been the biggest issue. Each of the interviews and editorials takes a long time to communicate and confirm, I can’t afford the time and money to get everything done on time. The only thing I can do now is focus on the text content, try to finish the interviews by e-mail and phone, ask the interviewees to provide their self-portraits, and find a way to use it in the magazine,” he added.

    Independent magazines in areas with stricter lockdown rules than Europe are facing even more challenges.

    Cynthia Jreige, founder and editor in chief of the Beirut and Dubai-based Jdeed magazine, said: “The apparition of the virus in Lebanon has forced all the businesses that aren’t ‘first necessity’ to shut down, the printing house we work with and most of our distribution points included. Fortunately, the printers were able to work in shifts to finish the production which ended up being delayed by about a week.”

    Distribution has also been severely disrupted. The magazine could only be delivered to 45 stores in Lebanon, instead of the usual 340, and international shipping has stopped as Beirut International Airport has been closed for almost three weeks.

    In response to the restrictions, she has released more content from the latest issue online, and partnered with Toters, the top delivery company in Lebanon, to make sure her readers will be able to receive the magazine on their doorsteps. She is also about to start a series of live interviews on Instagram with designers, photographers, make-up artists and vegan restaurant owners.

    Some publications are less impacted, such as the annual, independent fashion magazine 1 Granary, which was founded by Olya Kuryshchuk when she was a fashion student at Central Saint Martins and doesn’t rely too much on advertising. The majority of the revenue of the publication comes from sponsorships, brand and showroom consultancies and event partnerships.

    “We released our latest issue mid-November and plan to begin working on the next issue from May,” said Kuryshchuk, who is currently stranded in Mexico due to the lockdown. “This month we will be observing and gathering ideas and information that will feed into our print. We can see the undying demand for online orders, and our distributors are working nonstop. As long as the printing press is able to stay open, we hopefully will manage to go ahead.”

    She said the core team is very small. “None of the [British] government support schemes work for any of us. For now, there are no changes and I am determined to support my team through this time. But thanks to the success of our previous issue and the multiple revenue streams of 1 Granary, we should be secure for the next few months,” she added.

    Started as a student magazine from Central Saint Martins, 1 Granary is also aiming to help fashion students who, due to the virus, won’t be able to stage graduate shows. The magazine is proposing to showcase and promote their work online and represent them via their graduate showroom.

    source | wwd
     
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  9. mikel

    mikel Well-Known Member

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    Since when is ‘Conde Nast’s Love’ an independent magazine :rofl:
     
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  10. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    ^Watch how Diet Prada will make a thing out of it in 3...2....
    They live to see WWD slip up, don't ask me why.
     
  11. FashionMuseDior

    FashionMuseDior Active Member

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    I don't think we're seeing the effects of the covid-19 on magazines just yet, maybe in two or three months?
     
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  12. Srdjan

    Srdjan Well-Known Member

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    To whom it may concern: Hungarian Elle, Marie Claire and InStyle all went bimonthly due to the epidemics. Cosmo already started coming out once in two months with their January-February issue, while Glamour in Hungary is still a monthly (for now).
     
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  13. caioherrero

    caioherrero Well-Known Member

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    In a live today at Vogue Brazil instagram, the EIC revealed that today they had a meeting with all vogue editors in the world to discuss the September issue. And she said that there will be more shocking covers like vogue Italy and they are working with illustrators.
     
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  14. AbbeyRoad

    AbbeyRoad Active Member

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    Ed
    thanks for this ​
     
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  15. amby

    amby Well-Known Member

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    Norman Tan of Esquire SG is confirmed as the EIC of Vogue Singapore
     
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  16. amby

    amby Well-Known Member

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  17. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Not entirely opposed to this move because Norman's work at Esquire Singapore was solid. He managed to snatch top celebrities from the UK and US editions and turned the brand into a powerhouse. Esquire is fashion-forward and filled with great content and strong advertising. I can see him get a lot of advertisers on board, court a lot of big name photographers and cast, but I don't know he'd deal with women's fashion. Elle and Bazaar Singapore, just like his Esquire, are very international in their approach because imo most Singaporeans in general are like that. He'd definitely need to go more in that direction, but maybe with less celebrities? But just because someone is good with men's fashion doesn't mean they're as good with women's - and vice versa.

    Keen to see how this will play out. And I'm beginning to wonder whether CN looks at gender when appointing these EICs. It's a slippery slope, to be honest.
     
  18. helmutnotdead

    helmutnotdead Well-Known Member

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    Who the f*ck cares about Vogue Singapore?
     
  19. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Vogue Italia Reacts to Coronavirus Crisis With Special Edition
    For the first time in the history of the glossy magazine, the April edition of Vogue Italia features a totally white cover.


    MILAN — Vogue Italia is reacting to the coronavirus pandemic with a special issue, featuring, for the first time in the history of the magazine, a totally white cover.

    “White is, first and foremost, respect. White is rebirth, light after the darkness, the sum of all the colors. White is the uniforms of those who have saved lives while risking their own. It’s time and space for thinking. And for staying silent too. White is for people who are filling this time and space with ideas, thoughts, stories, verses, music and kindness to others,” said Vogue Italia editor in chief Emanuele Farneti. “It’s a reminder that after the crisis in 1929, clothes turned white, a color chosen to express purity in the present and hope for the future. And above all, white is not surrender; it’s a blank page to be filled, the frontispiece of a new story about to begin.”

    Inside, the April issue of the magazine — which hits newsstands today and is free for download at the title’s web site — shows a fashion feature realized in a week by 40 artists who usually collaborate with the glossy publication. Reflecting the emergency, which is shaking the industry, the feature includes contributions from high-profile fashion personalities such as Steven Klein, David Sims, Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, Joe McKenna, Bella and Gigi Hadid, Collier Schorr, Glen Luchford, Paolo Roversi, Petra Collins, Willy Vanderperre, Olivier Rizzo and Lindsey Wixson to cite a few, who shot at-home pictures of themselves, their families and their friends connected online.

    “Some people say that the raison d’être of Vogue is to entertain — to offer a few hours of divertissement to those who leaf through its pages. I don’t know about that. What I do know, as you’ll read in this issue, is that in its long history stretching back over 100 years, this magazine has come through wars, crises, acts of terrorism. I know that its noblest tradition is never to look the other way (perhaps the most shining example is Audrey Withers, who was editor in chief of the British edition during the Nazi air raids). Because, as Withers herself observed, to be passive is to consent to the status quo,” Farneti wrote in the editor’s letter. “Just under two weeks ago, we were about to print an issue that we had been planning for some time, and which also involved L’Uomo Vogue in a twin project. But to speak of anything else — while people are dying, doctors and nurses are risking their lives and the world is changing forever — is not the DNA of Vogue Italia. Accordingly, we shelved our project and started from scratch.”

    Participating in the creation of the magazine during the global lockdown, a range of fashion designers — such as Dior creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri, Miuccia Prada, Valentino creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli, Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele, Donatella Versace, Michael Kors, Stella McCartney, No. 21 creative director Alessandro Dell’Acqua and Jeremy Scott — created dedicated sketches. In addition, Michele and Piccioli discussed with Vogue Italia how they are coping with the creative process while working from home.
    source | wwd
     
  20. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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    Messages:
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    Posted Jan 23, 2020:

    Pats myself in the back. CIA hire me.
     

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