The Business of Magazines #4

Discussion in 'Magazines' started by Thread Manager, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Really sad about the spate of recent closures, especially in smaller markets like Australia, Malaysia and South Africa. At least here in the UK there are loads of opportunities. I think what some people don't realise is that it not only trickles all the way down to masthead staff without a job, but it also limits their chances of securing a job elsewhere because I'm sure competitor magazines are cut to the bone as we speak. That's not even taking into consideration the freelancers who are usually the first to be purged, and young, freshly graduated creatives who had hoped to start a career in magazines.
     
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  2. tigerrouge

    tigerrouge don't look down

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    I can't imagine young people wanting to start a career in fashion magazines these days, a dead-end industry that hasn't paid well for a long time, never mind now.

    It's better than NO job - but anyone who fancies themselves as a fashion or a beauty expert can set themselves up on social media and receive all the attention and PR samples they desire, and anyone burning to write or report in a serious capacity will still lean towards news outlets rather than fashion magazines for their opportunities. Designers (eg page layouts), copywriters... there are a lot of better-paid (if boring) avenues for those people than publications that often don't even pay them in the first place.

    I went from working in print to working in an industry where I regulated where print ends up. The latter has no glamour, but money goes a long way in life.
     
  3. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    They can, yes, but there's certainly a lot of instant prestige attached to working for a well-known magazine as opposed to starting your own platform, building trust with your following (which is not as easy as it sounds!) and relationships with advertisers, creating your own content etc etc. It's a long and arduous process versus working for a magazine (however poorly paid) and coat tailing off its reputation.
     
  4. tigerrouge

    tigerrouge don't look down

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    I imagine being able to earn money is a much bigger worry for young people than it was years ago - the entry-level positions in the magazine world that pay a living wage are long gone. Prestige doesn't pay the rent, and even the most hopeful intern knows it could be years before they get any tangible return on their slave labour.

    We're aware of all the famous "lifers" who have been working at prestigious publications for decades, but they're the unicorns. For most people, working at a magazine or newspaper - at any of the hundreds of lesser titles out there in Malaysia or Australia or wherever - is a phase in life that comes to an end when they need a better wage, or lose their job because the title has gone bust.

    So there's nothing much to be gained at the start, and there's no future in it either.

    Because even the unicorns get herded out into "consultancy" roles and "freelance" work. Your name's still on the masthead so you still work for the magazine... in spirit.

    If you're twenty and working in magazines and unable to pay your rent, it's almost romanticised - but being much older and suddenly downgraded and unable to pay your mortgage... nobody's making movies about those people.
     
  5. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    They can deny it all they want, but WSJ Magazine will most likely end up going digital only.

    WSJ. Magazine to Skip August Print Issue Due to the Coronavirus
    A number of fashion and lifestyle magazines in the U.S. have been altering their summer print plans during lockdown.

    WSJ. Magazine is the latest print publication adjusting its summer plans due to the coronavirus.

    The monthly fashion and luxury-focused insert for the weekend edition of The Wall Street Journal will skip an August print issue this summer, a representative confirmed. Instead, some planned content will be included in an expanded summer digital issue, which made its debut last year with cover face Kim Kardashian West.

    The publication has been making a push on the digital side lately, with the recently released bonus May digital cover featuring Miley Cyrus, and a stand-alone Kanye West digital cover in April.

    Its bread-and-butter print component isn’t going anywhere, though, according to a spokeswoman, who said no other changes are planned and the August print issue will return in 2021.

    WSJ. is one of a number of magazines making shifts to their print schedules this summer. As previously reported by WWD, Elle, Harper’s Bazaar and Marie Claire, all owned by Hearst Corp., will each publish just one combined issue this summer, compared to three separate issues last year.

    At rival Condé Nast, Vogue has combined June and July and Condé Nast Traveler has also been shifted to be heavier later in the year due to global travel freezing up.

    Paper Magazine, meanwhile, won’t publish a summer or fall issue and its owner ENTtech Media is yet to decide if it will continue in print.

    As well as difficulties conducting fashion shoots and creating other content during lockdown, many magazines are being impacted by a steep decline in advertising as brands cut budgets due to the spread of COVID-19. This is a problem the whole media industry is facing and in many cases comes despite record engagement.

    Last week News Corp., the owner of The Wall Street Journal, said the publication had hit a record three million subscribers for the first time. It noted, though, there had been a third quarter 18 percent decline in print advertising revenues in its Dow Jones division that includes the Journal, partially offset by a 25 percent increase in digital advertising.
    source | wws
     
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  6. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    I hear you, and maybe that's the reason why people job hop faster than they change underwear. I'm a firm believer that you have to do something because you're truly passionate about it versus how much money you can make off it from the get go. The money will follow, but it simply cannot be your prime motivation.
     
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  7. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Condé layoffs just dropped.

    Condé Nast will pink-slip about 100 employees in the U.S. and is putting another 100 on unpaid leave for several months as the COVID-19 crisis cuts into the media company’s business.

    The New York-based company, whose titles include the New Yorker, Wired, Vogue, Vanity Fair and GQ, had about 6,000 employees worldwide at the start of 2020.

    CEO Roger Lynch announced the cutbacks in a memo to staff Wednesday. One month ago, he told employees that layoffs were in the offing, along with other cost-cutting measures. An insider said the layoffs span all areas of the company and aren’t targeted at individual brands or groups, although some teams may be hit harder than others.

    Condé Nast Lays Off 100 U.S. Employees, Furloughs Another 100 Staffers

    “Through this crisis we’ve all gone through many states of emotion, personally and professionally, and I’m deeply saddened to have to write this note with the news that we’ll be saying goodbye to some of our U.S. colleagues,” Lynch said in the May 13 memo.

    In addition to the layoffs, Lynch wrote, the company is furloughing about 100 employees who “can’t effectively work during this period,” such as those in Condé Nast’s events group. Also, a “handful” of employees will have reduced work schedules, according to Lynch, who joined the company about a year ago after serving as CEO of Pandora and Dish Network’s Sling TV.

    Per Lynch’s memo, Condé Nast is providing severance packages and job-placement resources to employees who are getting laid off. For furloughed staffers, the company will “cover the full cost of their healthcare premiums while they are out on furlough,” the CEO wrote.

    Condé Nast’s previously enacted cost-saving measures included pay cuts of 10%-20% for those earning at least $100,000 per year and a 50% salary reduction for Lynch and outside board members. Lynch said it has limited hiring and closed hundreds of open roles across the company’s divisions.

    The company also is deferring until 2021 several big strategic initiatives, including the rollout of Condé Nast’s Copilot content-management system to additional markets this year; the buildout of global internal events spaces; and a global employee intranet.
    source | variety
     
  8. dodencebt

    dodencebt Well-Known Member

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    Two hundred people out of a job.. even though half of those are supposedly furloughed for a few months, most of them will probably never return to Conde Nast. It's a devastating situation for print media, but an indicator of what's to come. Not to sound too pessimistic, but the financial cutbacks have just begun; it will surely get worse.
     
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  9. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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    I have a feeling that COVID19 and the looming global recession it caused will impact the print industry the most. We can see it already starting and we've barely pass COVID19.

    The Top US Magazines (Vogue, Bazaar, Elle, Cosmopolitan) may survive a few more years or even a decade. Though there will come a time where they'll start making 4 issues a year.
     
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  10. honeycombchild

    honeycombchild Well-Known Member

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    It’s going to be really interesting to see the sales figures and subscription numbers from this period. It could be down to stocking issues of course, but everytime I’ve been to the supermarkets here during lockdown the magazine shelves have been half empty, with no copies of your big publications left. Some days I’d say when they had been stocked up so I know they were coming in and realistically it would seem like a prime time for people to have been reaching for the Print copies as they shop.

    I do imagine however that the closure of places like WHSmith will have left a huge deficit of print sales.
     
  11. 8eight

    8eight Well-Known Member

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    UK magazines. What will happen?

    Grazia is currently fortnightly.
    ES magazine is on hiatus.
    The Stylist has gone digital. They had a lovely Shira Haas cover last week. What a waste.
    Style with the Sunday Times are doing buy in/repeat covers. Which they said they would never do.
    The Hearst monthlies are business as usual this month. No Corona cover changes.
    Vogue. What will they do for September? Will people advertise?
    Esquire. Currently only six issues a year. Can it survive this?
    Elle. Already so much buy in content. I guess we can expect more?

    I guess, the strongest survive?
     
  12. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    The fact that ES is on hold probably tells you the magazine relies solely on advertising income.

    It's really a shame that Stylist went digital-only. Like Sunday Times, I do enjoy reading the print copies because it really captures the sort of UK-specific content that is relevant. What we're eating, doing, thinking etc. I can go to other magazines if I want a global perspective. Sadly with digital, their brand will reach even fewer readers. They're not AirMail. I only rush to open emails with the subject: 'Graydon Carter here....'

    More concerned about Esquire and Elle. I've started liking their content and direction, and Alex boldly assured everyone in a podcast interview that the magazine WILL stay in print 5 years from now. Then again, he also said that Esquire is in a class it's own and doesn't compete with GQ. Which, :rolleyes:.

    Speaking of podcasts, here's an interview with Edward. Alexandra will no doubt clap back in 3...2...

    ‎Talk Art: Edward Enninful OBE (QuarARTine special episode) on Apple Podcasts
     
  13. magsaddict

    magsaddict Active Member

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    Not sure if this was ever posted, but speaking of Esquire UK,
    Men's mags are dying, but what they do matters

    Although it's about men's magazines, I think this article really highlights the disconnect between circ and what people actually buy from a newsstand.
     
  14. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    I will always have a soft spot for Graydon Carter, if only for Spy and the brilliant tiny hands thing that still continues to this day. Lol

    WSJ. My Monday Morning
    Graydon Carter on Writing a Memoir in Lockdown

    In our series My Monday Morning, self-motivated people tell WSJ. how they start off the week.

    In some ways, Graydon Carter’s lockdown sounds like another person’s dream vacation. The former Vanity Fair editor in chief, who now runs the digital newsletter Air Mail, which he founded last year, has been hunkered down at his home in Opio, a town in Provence, France, since stay-at-home began in March. (He’s been living there on and off since 2017.) There he wakes with the sun, begins work at 11 a.m., awaits deliveries from his wine dealer and fishmonger and enjoys movie marathons with his wife, Anna Scott Carter, and two of his children. That’s not to say it’s all play; Carter, 70, makes multipage lists every day to keep track of all of his work and other to-do’s.

    In mid-May, Air Mail collaborated with Shreeji News and Magazines to revamp and reopen a “highly curated” newsstand, coffee bar and reading room across from London’s Chiltern Firehouse, a luxury hotel in Marylebone. But Carter says he doesn’t miss the world of print journalism. “I switched over to digital; I even prefer a digital newspaper to the actual paper,” he says. “I don’t want to be in the physical business. We designed Air Mail to be assembled from different locations around the world.”

    Here, Carter talks to WSJ. about why he starts each day with a liter of room temperature water, what his writing routine is like as he makes progress on his memoir and whether or not he still reads Vanity Fair.

    What time do you get up on Mondays, and what’s the first thing you do after waking up?

    I get up pretty much the same time every day. I wake up with the sun and I get up between 7 and 7:30 a.m. I never use an alarm clock. Then I open the curtains and stretch a bit and I try to drink a liter of water before I have coffee every morning. My grandma who died at 97 made a habit of that, and I think it’s a good habit. I think the body is much more relieved to have room-temperature water first thing in the morning than a hot cup of coffee. And then I do what I’ve done for years: I spend the next couple of hours reading the papers. While over here in France, I read the European papers first and then I read the American ones. I read the British papers—the Daily Mail, the Times and the Guardian. Then [my Air Mail co-editor] Alessandra [Stanley] will send me clippings that she read in the French papers, and I’ll do Google Translate because it would take me forever to read an article in French. Then I go to The Journal, the Times, the Washington Post and the New York Post. I make notes while I’m reading them and I send things that I think are interesting to my email account. Then I’ll shower and shave. Even during the lockdown, I shave every day.

    What’s next?

    And then what I’ll do is I’ll sit down and plan out my day. I plan it out and I print it out. It runs to three pages. It’s just the people I want to stay in touch with, a lot of people. We have nowhere to live in New York because our apartment was in the middle of a renovation when the coronavirus hit, so that’s been put on indefinite hold, but we still have a weekly meeting to talk with our architects about the final details, so I keep [notes on] that. Things I have to order…. Then there’s a lot of Air Mail stuff. I talk to the staff almost every day, and Alessandra and I, we deal with each other probably 30 times a day. Then I highlight what I definitely want to do today and I boldface what I hope to do today. Then I print it out, staple and I start work around 11 o’ clock.

    When I was at Vanity Fair, I would do pretty much the same thing. I probably wouldn’t get to the office much before 11 or 11:15, but I’d already edited all my manuscripts, done all my emailing to Europe, all my correspondence. Because when I came to the office, I basically just talked to people all day long: writers or photographers or editors or staff members. My schedule hasn’t changed that much in moving to Europe and starting Air Mail and running Air Mail under lockdown.

    What do you eat for breakfast to start the week off right?

    I eat the same thing for breakfast every day. I have a plain soy yogurt.

    Do you take vitamins?

    I take a load of vitamins. I have a great doctor in New York who’s big on Eastern and Western medicine, so I take an assortment every morning religiously and generally just with hot water.

    What about caffeine?

    I drink a lot of coffee. I probably drink too much. In the house here in France, we have a 1975 coffee maker. It’s the oldest coffee maker I’ve seen operating today; it should go in the Smithsonian. I’ll make a big pitcher of coffee for myself and two other members of my family who are here with me. Whatever’s left over, I’ll put it in [the refrigerator] and keep it as iced coffee and drink that in the afternoon. I’ll probably have five or six cups a day.

    Is there anything you do on Monday to prevent yourself from having a bad week?

    I meditate before I start work every morning and then two mornings a week at 11 o’ clock, I do Pilates with our wonderful Pilates instructor. Since the lockdown, we do it video style which saves me all the drive time. [But] I basically wake up in a good mood.

    What’s your writing routine like right now?

    I’m working on a memoir, so I spend an hour a day [on that] and an hour a day drawing, so those are usually later in the afternoon.

    There’s never a good time for it, but I do believe in leaving a paragraph half-finished. When you come back to it, it’s much easier to finish a paragraph than to start a new one. I never really have writer’s block; I can write well or badly on individual days. But I try to put an hour aside a day to work on this quasi-memoir.

    Air Mail has a London newsstand as of May 13. Why a physical store right now?

    Well, that was one of our editors at large, Laura de Gunzburg, and her husband is Gabriel Chipperfield. He’s an architect, and they worked out an arrangement with the people who owned the newsstand to do it this way. And I happen to love the way it looks. My [role] is just the Air Mail aspect of it—approving the design of the cups and some branding things. But other than that, it was done by my staff.

    Do you still read Vanity Fair?

    I don’t read magazines that much, strangely, only if it’s to find out what they’ve done so we don’t duplicate it. But newspapers are much more of interest to me right now, and they’re much more useful in assembling Air Mail. I don’t want to duplicate what the American papers have done. Chances are, in a fresh copy of Air Mail, most of those stories are stories you haven’t read before. That’s the goal.

    What’s lockdown life in France like? Have you mostly been staying home?

    Yeah, other than walking the dog. Even our wine dealer delivers, we have an incredible fishmonger who delivers. [Before the pandemic,] I hated running around all the time. This really agrees with me; I may never go back to my old way. I have FOGO, fear of going out.

    So this period suits you?

    It suits me amazingly. My wife, who is much more sociable than I am, even she’s come around to it. [Before,] every weekend, she’d want to go off to Antibes or Nice or do something…. My youngest daughter and I, we just sort of like to relax. I’m very comfortable being lazy. I’ll be happy to get back out into the outside world, but I’m in no rush.

    Have your routines shifted at all?

    I was telling a friend this week, I always found church a forced march, and there’s a beautiful church in Nice that we go to, and I reluctantly go along with my wife, who loves it. And now that I can’t go, I miss it, even though it is a forced march. This church has a wonderful minister, who I love to hear. And I miss seeing the locals from the towns and the village square restaurants…. There’s very little happenstance during lockdown, everything has to be planned out.

    Is there anything you miss about New York?

    I miss my friends and my family. There are a lot of things I don’t miss. I don’t miss the running around. New York to me is all about your friends and your family and it’s not about tall buildings or the beautiful climate or the clean, air-conditioned subways—those are not attractions. It’s just friends and family. And I miss going to restaurants. I love going to restaurants.

    As a restaurant owner [Carter co-owns the Waverly Inn and Monkey Bar in New York City], what do you predict will happen to dining after this?

    Oh, I think it’s going to be brutal for the next two or three years. But, you know, the good thing is people and Americans and New Yorkers particularly have some collective sense of amnesia. I think after two, three years, this will be a distant but searing memory and the people and restaurants will be filled again and they will stay that way until the next thing comes around.

    Are you reading any good books or watching any good TV?

    Well, a lot of books. This house happens to have a great library, and we brought a lot of books. I’ve reread a lot of P.G. Wodehouse, two or three Evelyn Waugh books. I read this series by Martin Walker about a police chief in Provence. It’s a set of procedural mysteries. We’ve watched this series called A French Village on Hulu about a village in France during the German occupation. I happen to love The Durrells in Corfu that ran on PBS and is available over here now. My youngest son, who’s staying with us here, he and I have been having a Steven Seagal film festival that just appalls my wife. But we’ll have a film festival, we’ll have Hitchcock night, a thriller night, an epic night. We change it up different nights after dinner. Sometimes we’ll change up where we eat. Sometimes we’ll eat up on the terrace—you can see the sea from there. We play a lot of card games and Rummikub. If you’ve never played Rummikub, I highly advise it. It’s a boring board game your grandmother probably played in the 1930s, but it’s really good and really tense at cocktail hour.

    My philosophy is always to make the best of the circumstances that have been delivered to you.

    What’s one piece of advice you’ve gotten that’s guided you?

    I had a large failure when I was young. I had a magazine when I was in Canada that went bankrupt in 1977, before I came to America, and I always tell my kids, I learned more from that failure than from any success that came after it. You never learn from success; you only learn from failure. What you try to do is to keep those failures—because you’re going to have failures on a daily basis, on a weekly basis, on a monthly basis—just try to keep them small.
    source | wsj
     
  15. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Fashion Editor Joseph Carle, Who Discovered Liu Wen, Dies at 65

    Carle was credited with discovering Liu Wen when she was a fitting model and the launch of the Chinese editions of Marie Claire and Numéro.


    Tianwei Zhang

    [​IMG]
    Liu Wen and her mentor Joseph Carle, who discovered her
    when she was a fitting model at Marie Claire China.

    Fashion editor and stylist Joseph Carle, who discovered Liu Wen and launched the Chinese editions of Marie Claire and Numéro, has died in France at age 65. The cause of death was cancer.

    Carle started his career in Paris in the late Eighties, polishing his credentials by working with Avenue Magazine, Madame Figaro and Vogue Hommes. He then worked for Elle France for almost a decade and stayed at DS Magazine briefly before moving to China in 2005 to spearhead the launch of Marie Claire China.

    It was a time when fashion publications in the market began to look up to their international peers by adopting a more global point of view, as luxury spending soared in China.

    Dan Cui, former fashion director of GQ China, who started his career under Carle at Marie Claire China, remembered how Carle raised the magazine’s standards.

    “Joseph brought professionalism to China. Before he arrived, the sample room was the closet for cleaning tools, and there was no such thing as a fitting. He set the rules to have mandatory fittings three days before the shoot, and he taught me that being beautiful is not enough for an editorial, it needs to convey ideas,” Cui said.

    During his tenure at Marie Claire China as creative director, Carle also discovered the then-little-known model Liu Wen when she was a fitting model for the magazine.

    “It was at the end of 2006, I was doing some prep work for our anniversary December issue, then Joseph walked into the studio and saw Liu Wen,” said Cui. “He got very excited and asked me, ‘Who is she?’ I said she is just a new girl, and he said: ‘No, she is a star. The light loves her. I felt the same way when I first saw Linda Evangelista. We are going to shoot the entire issue with her!'”

    He later put her on the cover of the magazine repeatedly and it kick-started her international modeling career. Carle called up his contacts in Paris to make sure top designers were aware of Liu’s arrival.

    “In 2006, I met my most important mentor in my life,” Liu wrote on Weibo. “When I can’t express myself in French, I can always feel what you are trying to express. It was you who kept encouraging me to be myself behind the camera, to learn more about the industry, and be confident. No matter how many years have passed and where you are, I will always remember your encouragement, your support, your mentor, and your smile. I will miss you forever Joseph Carle.”

    Carle later joined Modern Media in Shanghai in 2010 and launched the Chinese editions of Numéro and Numéro Homme. Liu also appeared on the cover of the launch issue.

    Xiao Xue, former editor in chief of Elle China for 14 years, who used to work with Carle at Hachette Filipacchi, told WWD that he was one of the ex-pats who helped shape the modern Chinese fashion publication landscape.

    “I was very impressed with his hard-working attitude and child-like characteristics. He nurtured a generation of fashion editors and creatives during his post at Hachette Filipacchi and Modern Media, and he discovered Liu Wen. He was a treasure to us all.”
    source | wwd
     
  16. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    September Issues Will Be Exactly What They Say on the Cover
    This Year
    Magazine publishers are pushing back the newsstand release date of the most important issue of the year to September instead of August due to the coronavirus.


    Kathryn Hopkins

    In the world of glossy fashion magazines, September is actually August, but this year the September issues will do just what they say on the cover.

    Some publishers are pushing back the release dates of their most crucial issues of the year from August to September, allowing more time for ads and samples to roll in. It will also give editors additional time to shoot models and celebrities, a task that has been difficult to carry out during lockdown.

    “Our September issues will come out in September — something I’ve wanted to do for years,” said Carol Smith, the publisher of Hearst’s Harper’s Bazaar, Marie Claire and Elle. For Marie Claire, that means Sept. 1 and for Elle and Bazaar, Sept. 8. Subscriber and digital issues tend to arrive a few days earlier. Usually the newsstand September issues are released in mid- to late August.

    “When we started talking to Italy [in mid-May] only a handful [of brands] had shot their campaigns….so on that side giving them more time to create their ads for sure, but on the edit side giving our editors more time to get in their samples,” Smith added.

    With many factories, warehouses and offices around the world closed for the past couple of months due to the coronavirus outbreak, brands have struggled to produce clothes and accessories, let alone the opulent, expensive ads that often involve a small army of photographers, stylists and makeup artists.

    But with Italy gradually unlocking, some companies are beginning to act. Max Mara recently shot its campaign, styled by Carine Roitfeld, who traveled from Paris to Milan by car for the project. Others have turned to virtual shoots.

    Nevertheless, Smith acknowledged that it will be a tough year. “While I believe very strongly that fashion and luxury will recover, it’s going to be a tough 2020. [Brands] have to make up for lost ground,” she said.

    In terms of ads, only around three brands have told Smith they won’t advertise in September. Others are scaling back their usual spend. “In fashion, you know in September Saint Laurent needs six pages. Well, maybe they’re going to run four in an issue. So, yes, there’s going to be a slight scale back. We have anticipated it and certainly projected that.”

    In the long-gone heyday of magazine publishing, September issues were as thick as a telephone book, jam-packed with ads from luxe retailers. But in recent times they have become thinner and thinner as brands move some of their ad spend elsewhere, either to their own or other digital channels. The pandemic appears to be accelerating the trend, with nearly every media outlet reporting shrinking ad revenues despite record engagement in many cases.

    WWD’s previous research of 2019’s September ads found that Vogue scored the most at 356 pages, or 59 percent of the book, although this was down from 427 pages in 2009, when the country was mired in recession, and from 562 pages in 1999. In second place was Bazaar, which had 222 pages of ads, or 55 percent of the book. In 2009, there were 276 pages and in 1999, there were 325 ad pages in that magazine’s September issues.

    For Vogue, to which its September issue is so important there was a whole documentary about the 2007 edition that weighed close to five pounds, the newsstand release date is also early September. Last year’s September issue was available on newsstands in New York and L.A. on Aug. 13, and nationwide Aug. 20.

    It’s understood this is also to allow the magazine, which once used to set the agenda for the entire fashion industry in its September issue, to give its brand partners more time, as well as staffers producing content. Such a move by Vogue and the other titles could also align with the reopening of more retail stores. Otherwise they would be telling readers about the new fashion trends that they wouldn’t be able to go out and buy — at least in a store.

    Elsewhere at Condé, which has implemented two rounds of cuts as it grapples with falling advertising due to COVID-19, Vanity Fair, more general interest but still reliant on luxury advertising, seems to be sticking closer to its usual schedule of August, with plans to release its September issue at the end of that month.

    At Meredith Corp.’s InStyle, publisher Agnes Chapski did not provide WWD with a release date for September, but said: “For the September issue specifically, we plan to be flexible with our production schedule to accommodate the creative challenges our marketing partners are having as a result of the pandemic.” It usually hits newsstands mid-August and, according to a media kit, that was also the original plan for 2020.

    InStyle is the only fashion magazine that has stuck to its 12-month publishing schedule. Marie Claire, Bazaar and Elle each will have one summer issue, while Vogue combined June and July amid advertising and producing concerns. The latter plans to make the missing issue up with a bonus holiday edition.

    “I’m really proud of that,” InStyle editor in chief Laura Brown told WWD earlier this month about the magazine’s 12 issues. “Everyone has their reasons or their schedules and their economics and I’m not going to speak to other companies, but we’re doing it.”

    At the time, Brown was hoping InStyle could start shooting during the first week of June. “I have a really, really, really, really, really, really big idea for September and we just pray we can shoot it and if we can’t, we shoot it when we can.”

    The arrival of September magazines actually in September fits in with the growing consensus in the fashion industry that deliveries of new collections should be closer to their seasons — hence, fall clothes arrive in stores in the fall, and not in July. As for whether a later September issue will become the new norm in publishing, too, Hearst’s Smith hopes so. “I genuinely believe we should hold to this schedule and I think it does feel like finally fashion is going to change its delivery schedule and hopefully retailers will create new selling seasons so October isn’t when all of fall goes on sale.”
    source | wwd
     
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  17. caioherrero

    caioherrero Well-Known Member

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    Very good news!!!
     
  18. Miss Dalloway

    Miss Dalloway Well-Known Member

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    Awful news, i will go as far as to say, this signals The DEATH of The Spetember issue, those who know what i mean, know.......
     
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  19. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    I suppose if brands should reset, so must magazines. Dropping the first week of the actual calendar month is ok. But the idea of a September issue dropping later in the month is ridiculous. They may as well close up shop then. Nobody, except us on here, will wait weeks on end for the release. People will forget the magazine still exist. Just like Vogue Turkey, which is completely off my radar.
     
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  20. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Fashion Magazines Hit as Luxury Ad Spend Dwindles
    Global fashion houses are slashing their marketing budgets by 30 to 80 percent to weather the economic fallout of the pandemic.


    LONDON, United Kingdom — The coronavirus is taking a steep toll on magazines and newspapers that relied on Europe’s luxury brands as a last bastion of already dwindling advertising spending.

    Stripped of a key source of revenue, fashion glossies have gone on a crash diet. Gone are the days when readers had to flip through dozens of ads for the likes of Cartier jewellery, Fendi handbags, Versace dresses or Breitling watches to get to the table of contents; now it’s just inside the cover.

    With boutiques only beginning to reopen after weeks of shutdown and few people are in the mood to splash out, high-end brands have slashed ad budgets by 30 percent to 80 percent, according to digital-marketing agency Digital Luxury Group. The pandemic could hasten a shift to digital marketing by one of the last sectors to devote significant ad spending to newspapers and magazines.

    “Nobody knows if luxury brands will go back to investing in print ads as much as before the pandemic,” said Digital Luxury Group Chief Executive David Sadigh. “We’re already seeing more flows into digital as it reduces costs. That’s set to continue the more brands build up e-commerce and as they seek more direct return and measurable results from media.”

    Luxury brands committed 26 percent of their $2.9 billion ad spending in western Europe to newspapers and magazines last year, according to Publicis SA-owned media buying agency Zenith. That compares with 17 percent for overall advertising outlays.

    French Elle

    Chanel, Lancôme and Yves Saint Laurent perfumes are among the few big brands advertising in last week’s issue of French Elle. That compares with at least 26 pages of ads featuring well-known brands owned by luxury powerhouses Richemont, LVMH and Kering in the issue published on March 6, shortly before most of Europe and parts of the US started hunkering down at home.

    L'Oréal SA, which makes Yves Saint Laurent lipstick and Giorgio Armani perfume, has been eliminating costs and investments that aren’t indispensable, including advertising spending during lockdowns.

    “When stores are closed it doesn’t make sense to advertise products and it can be even frustrating to advertise products that consumers just cannot buy,” Chief Executive Jean-Paul Agon said April 16. L'Oréal said it will be ready to reinvest as soon as consumers can shop at stores again.

    Burberry Group Plc Chief Executive Marco Gobbetti said last week that the British label is reinventing the way it communicates, focusing on reaching consumers more directly. A spokeswoman declined to comment on marketing spend.

    LVMH’s Louis Vuitton didn’t entirely eliminate ads during the lockdowns but adjusted its product and travel themed marketing to acknowledge that distant shores were just a dream. Its print spots featured a shadowy shot of a child holding a kite against a seaside sunset, accompanied by a new slogan, “Imagination Takes Flight.”

    Online Shift

    With e-commerce the only option for many watch buyers, Swiss watchmaker Breitling shifted its focus from print ads to digital marketing during the lockdowns, a company spokeswoman said in an e-email. The publisher of Neue Zuercher Zeitung, one of the country’s largest newspapers, said watchmakers have been reluctant to advertise since the beginning of the crisis and that it faces high losses.

    Although some brands have said they’ll restart advertising once stores open again, the near-term shortfall will worsen the plight of newspaper and magazine owners. The sector has already had to resort to job cuts and sales amid cash crunches.

    As everything from job and apartment listings to editorial content moved online over the past decade, advertising income declined. Even billionaire Warren Buffett, who owns newspapers across the US, has called most “toast” because of the drop.

    The consequences of the advertising revenue losses during the confinement period at magazines and newspapers are going to be the most severe for smaller, regional outlets, according to Ilias Koteas, executive director at non-profit European Magazine Media Association in Brussels. A spokeswoman for CMI Media, which distributes Elle in France, declined to comment.

    “The print media sector was already struggling before Covid-19, and they’re going to struggle more now,” said Brian Wieser, global president of business intelligence at WPP Plc-owned media agency GroupM.

    By Corinne Gretler
    source | BoF
     

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