The Business of Magazines #4

Discussion in 'Magazines' started by tFS Thread Manager, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. caioherrero

    caioherrero Active Member

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    So they lost the fashion director and the fashion editor in one year.

    Poppy Kain still in the magazine?
     
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  2. Blayne266

    Blayne266 Active Member

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    Yeah she’s still in the masthead as senior fashion editor.
     
  3. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    :shock::shock::shock::shock:


    Vogue publisher Condé Nast reports annual loss of £14m



    The 2017 figure is huge swing from £6.6m profit of previous year as publisher invests in digital growth

    Mark Sweney
    Thu 3 Jan 2019 13.17 GMTLast modified on Thu 3 Jan 2019 16.59 GMT

    Condé Nast, the owner of glossy magazines including Vogue, Vanity Fair and GQ, has slumped to a £14m annual loss as it battles to reshape its business for the digital future.

    The high-end magazine publisher reported a pre-tax loss of £13.6m in 2017 – a huge swing from the £6.6m profit recorded the previous year – according to its most recent financial filings made public on Thursday.

    The company revealed that revenue was down 6.6%, from £121m to £113m.

    The reversal in fortune came in a tumultuous year that saw the British Vogue editor Alexandra Shulman leave after more than 25 years, while Nicholas Coleridge, who had run Condé Nast Britain for almost three decades, stepped back to become chairman. The group also halted publication of Glamour as a monthly print title.

    “[It] was a transformational year for Condé Nast Britain,” the publisher said in its Companies House filing. “Appointing new leadership across many of our brands, we reorganised team structures and relocated all staff into VogueHouse [London]. Condé Nast continues to make significant investments in its long-term digital growth.”

    The slide into the red didn’t stop the publisher’s directors from taking home a combined £2.4m, the same as the previous year when the company was in the black. There was also a payment of £1.39m in compensation for “loss of office” for an unnamed member of staff.

    Condé Nast said that much of the loss was attributable to one-off exceptional items, and that excluding those costs the publisher made a year-on-year profit of about £4m.

    The exceptional charges included £5.7m on business restructuring, including bringing all business units together at the Vogue House office, £2.2m in pension commitments and a near-£5m provision against a loan to Comag, a magazine distribution joint venture with rival Hearst it pulled out of.

    The publisher cut more than 50 jobs to employ 610 staff, however the group’s total wage bill still rose £5m to £47.2m.

    “Condé Nast Britain’s underlying profit in 2017 was positive,” said a spokeswoman for the company. “Due to exceptional costs, inter-company accounting and the contributions to the closed defined benefit pension scheme, the picture in the public domain is not representative of our profitability.”

    The tough trading conditions in the magazine market were also evident in the financial results of the Stylist Group, which has seen its losses double. Stylist was formerly called Shortlist Media, before it shut down Shortlist, the UK’s biggest men’s publication, late last year.

    The publisher, which is now focused on building its female-targeted title Stylist, reported a loss of £8.6m in the year to the end of March, up from £4.6m the previous year. Revenues rose marginally to £22.8m, as the publisher expanded into non-print businesses including events and built digital income.

    The Stylist Group is now owned by the Scottish publisher DC Thomson, which also owns an array of newspapers, magazines and genealogy sites including the Dundee Courier, Aberdeen Press & Journal, the Beano and Findmypast.


    TheGuardian.com
     
  4. jorgepalomo

    jorgepalomo Well-Known Member

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    WTF is doing Interview Magazine? Are they poor enough to make Golden Globes coverture from a tv or what?
     
  5. jorgepalomo

    jorgepalomo Well-Known Member

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    Out new design.

    I like the concept, very Condé Nast but the layout on the Out's name is a choice.
     
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  6. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Holy sh!t, I actually like it. A lot. It's not very original because remove the OUT masthead and slap on TeenVogue and nobody would be able to tell the difference. It's just a fresh direction for OUT.

    I don't really read gay lifestyle magazines despite being gay. Kind of like all the fashion obsessed TSFers who never visit the personal style/grooming threads on here.
     
  7. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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  8. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Harper’s Bazaar Expanding Fashion Editorial With New Leads

    Editor and new “dame” Glenda Bailey is looking to give her readers even more fashion this year.


    By Kali Hays on January 10, 2019

    The fashion editorial team is getting a little bigger at Harper’s Bazaar.

    Editor in chief Glenda Bailey is adding Miguel Enamorado as fashion director, WWD has learned, as Nicole Fritton, who has held that title for more than a decade moves up to a new title of executive fashion director.

    “Fashion is central to the heart of Bazaar,” Bailey, the magazine’s longtime editor in chief who just received a damehood from Queen Elizabeth II, wrote in a note. “With these new appointments, we are able to give our reader more of what she craves.”

    Enamorado, a stylist who was most recently fashion director at a pre-bankruptcy Interview magazine for several years, will now assist with shoots and fashion coverage at Bazaar, while Fritton’s role will grow to include all booking and the execution of all fashion features, in addition to general oversight of all fashion and accessories content.

    Bailey characterized Fritton as “the Harper’s Bazaar woman” with her “exquisite eye, fabulous taste” and said Enamorado also “has great taste and spirit.”

    Changes have been regular at Hearst Magazines over the last several months, as new magazines president Troy Young and new chief content officer Kate Lewis settle into their roles, but Bazaar has been one of the few titles to avoid any major shakeups. To its credit, the title has been faring well over the last year, capturing 25 percent of all magazine ad business for fashion and accessories and its print readership, as well as web and video traffic, are up year-over-year, according to the most recent data from MPA-The Association for Magazine Media.

    While sources have noted repeatedly that all Hearst magazine brands are getting a thorough review as Young and Lewis are working aggressively to implement a digital-first strategy across the division, it seems Bazaar is likely to get a lighter touch.

    Other publications, like Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan and Veranda, have seen bigger changes to leadership on the editorial and business sides, after showing dips in readership and some ups and downs with web traffic.

    WWD.com
     
  9. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Katie Grand’s Post-#MeToo Pivot

    With a lingerie-clad Emily Ratajkowski slurping spaghetti no longer quite the easy, breezy image of female empowerment it was claimed to be, the editor and superstylist has ditched her sexed-up annual Advent Calendar for #movingLOVE, reports Tim Blanks.

    BY TIM BLANKSDECEMBER 17, 2018 05:30

    LONDON, United Kingdom — This time last year, LOVE Magazine was a couple of weeks into its online Advent Calendar, every day a nubile, semi-naked supermodel celebrating “everything we love about women enjoying being women, on their own terms,” according to editor Katie Grand. Visit LOVE’s website – or its new YouTube home - this December, and the story has changed dramatically. The Calendar has transformed into #movingLOVE, 44 short films with a cast of characters that is textbook diverse in age, race and gender.

    Some of them perform, some of them simply tell their stories. Grand’s own favourite is April Ashley, the 83-year-old transgender pioneer. Iconic she may be, but for many LOVE-ers, this will be their introduction to a woman whose trail blazes brighter than ever through society’s current turbulent transitions. Ashley shared #movingLOVE’s last day of filming with Kate Moss. “It was one of the defining moments in my career that I could put those two people together,” says Grand.

    Them’s strong words, given that Grand has made a career out of defining moments in fashion, in her work with Marc Jacobs and Miuccia Prada, among many others, and with her track record in magazines. (She’s launched five to date.) Everything she’s done has been saturated with the zeitgeist. Look at LOVE’s evolution alongside the Instagram generation of models, the Jenners and Hadids, the Karlies, Caras and Stellas. It became their club magazine, the unselfconscious chronicle of their work and play. But the climate changed. Post-#MeToo, a lingerie-clad Emily Ratajkowski lubriciously slurping spaghetti in last year’s Advent Calendar was no longer quite the easy, breezy image of female empowerment that was intended when it was filmed earlier in the year.

    The ensuing controversy confirmed Grand in her conviction that it was time to move. “There’s a general air of some kind of revolution at the moment. I can’t think of any seismic change in the last ten years like what happened last year.” There was never a question about doing another calendar, though, at that point, Grand wasn’t sure what could take its place. Maybe nothing, though it didn’t make sense to ignore the audience that LOVE had acquired for its December spectacular. The answer was under her nose, in her kitchen at home.

    For the past three years, Grand’s husband Steve Mackey has been collaborating with fellow musicians Douglas Hart and Jeanette Lee on @callthis_number, a gorgeous guerilla film-making project. They've been shooting other musicians – the Pop Group, Peaches, Dennis Bovell, Jon Spencer — in a garage in West Hampstead (later reconstructed under 180 The Strand), editing the films on the spot, screening them, then deleting them, all in a day. “I was frustrated by the Internet’s literalness, its need to catalogue everything,” says Mackey. “The fact that you could switch off after 90 seconds and go back to it later meant there was no excitement. I wanted the unrepeatable thrill of the moment, just letting it be what it was. Like rave culture, you had to know where to find it if you wanted. You had to ‘call this number.’”


    Grand and Mackey kept their various spheres of influence distinct till they worked together on a set of short films for MiuMiu’s last collection, which matched @callthis_number’s rawness and spontaneity with the similarly confrontational essence of the collection. That was Grand’s Eureka moment, when she saw what #movingLOVE could be. “I think it was the thing of my close friends being really excited by what we were doing - and excited in a way I’d not heard for a long time.”

    #movingLOVE has had a similar effect on her. “This is probably the most work I’ve done. The magazine’s been not this intense for me for years.” It launched the first week of December with David Beckham, styled by Kim Jones (who makes his own appearance in another story). The dissociation from last December couldn’t have been more deliberate. “It made sense because he’s not from the same world, so it was always going to be so far away,” Grand explained. “But to have him walking onto the set in blue eyeshadow was quite the thing, I suppose.”

    Mackey and Hart pushed the idea of telling a story, so each subject is interviewed on camera. “Just connecting a person’s voice to their image changes everything,” said Mackey. “Four cameras, nowhere to hide, not presenting anything other than themselves. They asked ‘What you want me to do?’ but we didn’t direct them too much. You find out what they can do.” The camera contemplates the subjects unflinchingly while we hear their voices on the soundtrack. There is music too. It could almost be the Velvet Underground accompanying April Ashley while she sits in state. That tugs at a very timely thread which runs through #movingLOVE, echoes of the “screen tests” that Andy Warhol used to make of visitors to his Factory, and of the rough and ready shows his acolytes would make on public access YV in New York in the 80s. They’re included in the jawdropping Warhol retrospective now at the Whitney Museum.

    In my optimistic moments, I imagine all of this – the rawness, the spontaneity, the resistance to all things perfectly manicured – as the green shoots of a new creativity.

    “It was like Carpool Karaoke, but new,” is Grand’s take on her project. Some performers did what they did best. Liv Tyler threw off her shoes and danced, Sandra Bernhardt talked, Stella Maxwell put on a Prada swimsuit and did Stella Maxwell. Less predictable were radical New York performance artist Kembra Pfahler, and, of course, Ashley. As an elegant veteran of shoots with Avedon, Penn and Bailey, she was distinctly underwhelmed by the garage. Grand was worried she would walk. Mackey and Douglas ended up spending a lot of time with her.

    With Hart, Mackey shot stills throughout the filming with the idea of releasing a print document at the end. “Imagine how happy we are that the two exist together. It’s not easy to make 50 films and 250 pages at the same time.” But what joy — a film and a magazine, vestiges of old media, celebrating the new, proving that nothing ever really dies. The magazine will be released in a limited run of twenty thousand copies, with one advertiser (Celine).

    It rather begs the question of what’s next for the mothership, especially after a project which has disturbed LOVE’s prevailing ethos. “I thought of Issue 20 [the 10th Anniversary Issue which came out in the autumn] as the end of Chapter One,” says Grand. “The working title of this was Chapter Two, before I came up with #movingLOVE.” Still, she acknowledges a challenge. “For a long time, I’ve been thinking magazines shouldn’t be rigid anymore. Sometimes it’s good to do projects which aren’t two hundred pages of paper that are always the same. We’re very fluid in how we work financially and timewise. There aren’t really any boundaries. This is the biggest project we’ve done that didn’t have boundaries – and the most expensive.”

    Ah yes, numbers. Grand claims one of the best things about working with YouTube is that they’re so helpful with all that back-end stuff, like reach. Last year’s Advent Calendar totaled 89 million unique views, which clarified the risk factor for this year’s radical shift in sensibility. But early returns have been promising. The first week had 11.6 million uniques, more than all of 2016 put together, and on track to match last year.

    Grand admits there’s been the odd query on Instagram, someone wondering when Adriana Lima or Doutzen Kroes (it’s always them, she says) will show up naked. In the midst of last year’s controversy, Lima released a statement about her unwillingness to pose any longer for sexy videos on social media. It was construed by competitors as a reference to LOVE, even though Lima had never actually done anything like that in the years she and Grand have been working together. She does, in fact, appear in #movingLOVE later in the season, talking about beauty.

    “I’ve never wanted to do a magazine that no one looked at,” says Grand, stating the obvious. “But I’ve launched five magazines now in my life and I don’t think it would be about launching another magazine if I didn’t do this. There’s more interesting ways to put content out there than printed pages, much as I love and respect that and the whole process of putting a magazine together.”

    Grand accepts the challenge. “It’s obviously difficult educating a young audience about Kembra, April Ashley, Andie McDowell even. But people will find a way to them. And I want to know what they have to say. What will Finn Buchanan say?He’s 17, and he recognizes himself as a boy. Anita Bitton [who, with Greg Krelenstein, cast the project] found him at school in England for a trans story in W. This is the fourth project I’ve done with him.”

    I take it back to those numbers, the millions who have already experienced #movingLOVE. There’s something inspiring about the possibility that Kembra Pfahler and April Ashley could galvanise as many eyeballs as Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid. There is heart and soul in the world…and an urgent hunger for the stories they shape. And fashion is not immune.

    Business of Fashion.com
     
  10. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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    I mean, before you can give us “more” fashion, maybe give us fashion first?

    @Glenda @harpersbazaar
     
  11. jorgepalomo

    jorgepalomo Well-Known Member

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    Apparently, L’Officiel USA became digital. Does anybody know something about it?
     
  12. Srdjan

    Srdjan Well-Known Member

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    I don't know anything about it, but not surprised, the US edition was such a flop. Btw, I think Australian L'Officiel recently went digital only as well.
     
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  13. jorgepalomo

    jorgepalomo Well-Known Member

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  14. Ken Doll Jenner

    Ken Doll Jenner Well-Known Member

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    Every now and then, I’m baffled by many publications’ decision to launch a digital version of their monthly printed magazine. The nature of digital is fast-paced and fleeting, which requires contents to be posted more than once a day. You can’t simply rely on one big story or cover subject and then expect the readers to wait for another 30 days to get a different one. If that’s the strategy, you’ll only help Instagram’s dominance in my opinion.
     
  15. magsaddict

    magsaddict Active Member

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    L’Officiel Au has been digital only for a while.. it produced a dozen or so print editions and then completely disappeared and then it’s reappeared with these ‘digital issues’ but I’ve never even seen a digital issue just a few online shoots. Quite interesting.
     
  16. Hafyiez wafa

    Hafyiez wafa Active Member

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    MON likes this.
  17. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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    His profile says "CD @voguehongkong", so maybe he's the Creative Director?

    However, that logo is unfortunate. They better STICK to studio covers or else that "HONG KONG" inside the "O" would fade into the background

    They should have written Hong Kong in Chinese Characters. That would have been a moment.
     
  18. MDNA

    MDNA Well-Known Member

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    He’s the creative director, and rumor has it that Peter Wong (黄源顺) has been appointed EIC.
     
  19. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Allure Magazine Rolling Out New Editorial Look

    As one of the few beauty books in a struggling print market, Allure is looking at a “refresh” to keep it relevant for years to come.


    By Kali Hays on January 14, 2019

    Allure is gearing up to unveil a new look to its magazine and digital properties, but don’t call it a relaunch.

    Michelle Lee, the magazine’s editor in chief for nearly three years, prefers to think of upcoming changes, which have been in the works for months and will roll out fully with the upcoming March issue, in terms like “refresh” and “evolution.”

    “With magazines in general, you have standard departments, story formats — as an editor it’s easy to get stuck in that,” Lee said. “Eventually, it can get really boring. I always want to keep things fresh.”

    For Allure — recently the subject of plenty of industry chatter speculating its demise in print as its publisher Condé Nast has continued to shrink its operations, slate of print publications and budgets, overall — its “evolution” nevertheless means a number of changes are on the way.






    There will be a new typeface for the magazine; younger and more diversephotographers coming in for shoots; a more “beauty forward” approach to editorial content; a dedicated wellness section for the first time; a page called “Cult Object” is coming back after being cut a few years ago; Lee will have her own “My Favorite Product” page, and a series on vanities and bathrooms called “Beauty Spaces” is coming in as the new back page. Lee used words like “crisp,” “bright” and “fresh” to describe the look of what’s coming and said she sat down with her editorial team last year “to take a step back, to think about in 2019, who do we want to work with?”

    “The world of media has changed so much, the world of beauty and celebrity and Hollywood has changed so much, so I wanted to say, visually, ‘Where should we go?’”

    Lee agreed beauty is an industry that’s taken to social media unlike any other, with brands and marketers seeing a lot of success launching product online and on social platforms without need of support by institutional brands like Allure. The coup of getting a product recommended in the pages of a magazine has been all but replacedby the measurable impact of an influencer posting about a cream or a lipstick on Instagram or YouTube.

    So it’s not surprising that Lee is wanting to get ahead of the social game and have Allure do more of what influencer and social media stars do not, like invest in strong visuals and editorial content that’s researched, vetted and fact-checked.

    “When it comes to visuals and setting trends, we need to own that,” Lee said bluntly. “When there’s such a wealth of beauty content out there, it can get confusing. We need to be this voice of expertise to cut through the noise.”

    And print is still part of Allure keeping it’s authority in beauty. Asked whether the magazine would still be in print in five years, Lee was prepared: “Absolutely.”

    “As a brand, we’re committed to it, the company is so committed and there’s a growing interest in beauty,” Lee said. “We’re definitely very invested [in print].”

    Given the number of print titles that have closed, at Condé and elsewhere, it’s understandable that Lee would want to drive the point home.

    Although print readership is down 6 percent from a year ago, according the most recent data from MPA-The Association of Magazine Media, it seems digital is faring well enough to justify it as a prestige anchor. Desktop web traffic is up 11 percent year-over-year, mobile is up 13 percent and video is up 23 percent. Ad pages are said to be growing as well (possibly helped a bit by the closure of Glamour, which always had beauty ads), with placements for the February issue up 27 percent compared with last year, according to a Condé spokeswoman. She added that ads for March, which has yet to close, are “tracking well.”

    Allure also has a something of a side hustle with its subscription Beauty Box business (also getting a “refresh,” including a new “mini-magazine” featuring Allure editors), where the Condé said subscribers grew by 80 percent last year, and a growing e-commerce business, which exceeded its revenue goal by nearly 200 percent.

    Susan Plagemann, now chief business officer of Condé’s entire Style category, which Allure falls under, said simply: “Our beauty and wellness businesses are stronger than ever.”

    Since Allure is the only beauty-centric property left in Condé’s print arsenal, it’s a good thing.

    WWD.com
     
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  20. tigerrouge

    tigerrouge don't look down

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    If it's taken her this long into her tenure to realise what sort of content you need to put in a print magazine, I wouldn't put money on that.

    Every aspect of Allure should be performing strongly, given the strength of the health and beauty sector and people's eternal interest in these things.
     
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