The Business of Magazines #4

Discussion in 'Magazines' started by tFS Thread Manager, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. Rigida

    Rigida Well-Known Member

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    I hope the Allure redesign isn’t as bad as the Glamour one lol.
     
  2. caioherrero

    caioherrero Active Member

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    Oh something not good this way comes
     
  3. axiomatic

    axiomatic Active Member

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  4. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Former Vogue Entertainment Director Hops to British Vogue

    Cut from American Vogue last year, Jill Demling isn't straying too far with a post under Edward Enninful.

    By Kali Hays on January 15, 2019

    Jill Demling didn’t hold on to the title of “former” Vogue staffer for long.

    The longtime entertainment director of American Vogue, who was cut from her position last fall as Vogue continued to shrink and shift its masthead under budget constraints, has crossed the Atlantic to British Vogue, where she’s been named entertainment director at large. The magazine does not currently have an entertainment director and Demling’s position is effective immediately.

    In a post to Instagram, Demling expressed her excitement at working with “the brilliant” Edward Enninful, who became editor in chief of British Vogue a year ago and to whom she will report.

    “He and his team are pushing boundaries and producing a beautiful magazine that makes you stop and think,” Demling wrote. “I’m grateful to Edward for giving me the opportunity to continue my career at [British Vogue].”

    When Demling left American Vogue last year, it was right around the time that Oren Katzeff came in to lead the entire entertainment division at Condé Nast. The company line was that she was leaving to spend more time with her family, but it seems she was eager to keep working since it’s been less than three months between the two magazines. But the “at large” part of her new title means the position with British Vogue is on contract or a freelance basis, so not a full-time position like the one she held at American Vogue for 20 years. She started as an assistant to Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour.

    It’s possible that the transition to British Vogue may have been in the works since Demling left the American title, as she’s been posting steadily on social media about her many, many notable celebrity moments and covers for the magazine, as well as favorite shoots and work in general. And she is set to continue her celebrity-laden line of work at British Vogue, where her mandate is simply to oversee all entertainment bookings across the magazine. A representative of British Vogue could not be immediately reached for comment.

    It could be that Demling finds herself doing work here again, too, as Condé Nast is in the process of combining its U.S. and international arms in a broad restructuring that will eventually create one entity. It’s also searching for a new chief executive officer since Bob Sauerberg was forced out in November.

    The U.S. side of the company has been struggling to adapt to a post-print media landscape for at least a decade, accumulating hundreds of millions in financial losses in recent years, while Condé Nast International is said to be relatively stable, having long had a less lavish corporate culture on production spending and costs. Nevertheless, Condé Nast U.K., of Which British Vogue is a part and reports separately from CNI under a British mandate, just revealed its first loss in 23 years. A report for the rest of CNI is expected next month and could paint a rosier picture of non-U.S. operations, which have been under the purview of Jonathan Newhouse for several years.

    WWD.com
     
  5. A.D.C.

    A.D.C. Well-Known Member

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    All of these Edward hires ar “at large” seems he just want as many bold face names he can cram onto his mast head. Naomi, Kate, Grace, that one Director, etc...
     
  6. axiomatic

    axiomatic Active Member

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    Tough times continue for CN
    Wired Laid Off Five Staffers. Who’s Next at Condé Nast?

     
  7. axiomatic

    axiomatic Active Member

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    Cuts at Glamour as Condé Nast Transformation Continues

     
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  8. axiomatic

    axiomatic Active Member

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    https://nypost.com/2019/01/17/sports-illustrated-delays-date-for-2019s-swimsuit-edition/

     
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  9. axiomatic

    axiomatic Active Member

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    Got this in the mail, and while I've never paid much attention to Out, after flipping through it, the Teen Vogue comparison seems spot on design-wise. (except for the Pure for Men ad -_-).

    Only 88 pages, but some premium advertisers like LV, Gucci, Cadillac, and Lexus
     
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  10. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Pioneering fashion filmmaker and photographer Nick Knight talks about working with Alexander McQueen and Yohji Yamamoto

    • Knight started working in the fashion business in the 1980s as a photographer
    • Catch some of his fashion films and iconic photos at his exhibition at ArtisTree in Taikoo Place

    PUBLISHED : Sunday, 13 January, 2019, 9:04pm
    UPDATED : Monday, 14 January, 2019, 4:49pm

    Vincenzo La Torre
    [email protected]

    British-born Nick Knight, who as the founder of digital platform Showstudio, was one of the first photographers to create fashion films, likes to call himself an image maker.

    He started his career in the 1980s working for designers such as Yohji Yamamoto and went on to collaborate with the late Alexander McQueen and shoot for magazines such as Vogue.

    His videos and some of his most striking photographs are currently on view at Beyond Fashion, a photography exhibition at ArtisTree in Hong Kong.

    We caught up with the outspoken Knight on the eve of the opening of the exhibition. Here are excerpts from the conversation.

    On fashion as art

    There’s been a clear demand for fashion. Look at Savage Beauty [the 2011 exhibition about Alexander McQueen at the Metropolitan Museum in New York]. Who knew that it would be so successful? Fashion draws people to these institutions. Monet, Rembrandt and Caravaggio, all the great artists, are big draws, but museums need to have people coming through them. Someone like Alexander McQueen is a contemporary artist. Also, if you look at prices of fashion photographs at auction, you’ll see how they’ve gone up. There’s been an understanding that fashion photography is an important cultural medium. If you look back at the history of fashion photography, it’s like a barometer of cultural change in society so it has cultural value. A lot of people didn’t see it before but now they do.

    On Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto

    I started working with him in 1986 and his brief to me was always the same: “Show me my dreams.” It was a very nice way to interpret a collection. He would never say show me a sleeve length or a garment but take me somewhere I want to go, show me what my dreams are. His aesthetic was so beautiful and poetic. Before then designers expressed themselves so sexually, which started in the ’60s up until Aids. From the arrival of the pill to Aids you had this sexual bubble. Fashion imagery was very sexualised and fashion was hypersexualised. I never enjoyed that and my career began with Yohji Yamamoto, who never showed a woman’s cleavage or back or bottom. It was about her soul or heart or poetry or mind. The power of women’s bodies versus showing their bodies. It was very new for me and a very exciting time. It was a more intellectual discourse in fashion, which I think was entirely good.

    On fashion photography in Asia

    What’s happening in imagery at the moment is very forward looking. It’s the separation between photography, which is the past, and image making, which is the future. Image making entails fashion film, sculpture and lots of different mediums and now also artificial intelligence and virtual reality. Asia is much more in tune with that than the West. We’re also seeing politically in North America and Europe retrospective and populist movements that look to the past, whereas Asia prefers to look to the future. There was a desire to imitate the West, but now Asia is finding its own voice. From Vietnam to South Korea, lots of artistic communities are springing up that are not interested in just following or mimicking Western art. Now you see more Western artists coming to Asia because that’s where the energy is.

    On the digital revolution

    Anybody with a pen can claim to be a writer, but that hasn’t created a huge amount of great work. There are more photographers now but the proliferation of digital devices has just meant that more people know about image making but not all of them have the desire and devotion to articulate their whole lives through cameras like a photographer or image maker does. It’s about your whole life talking through that lens and that medium and taking an image and expressing yourself through that medium. There’s a difference between just taking a picture and making your lifetime about taking pictures.

    On the future of publishing

    Magazines sell 100,000 or 50,000 issues. When someone like Kim Kardashian has more than 100 million followers the power is not with the magazines but with people like her. Magazines no longer decide who should be in fashion. Now it’s done through social media. When you broadcast a fashion show live, like we were the first to do at SHOWstudio with Plato Atlantis, McQueen’s last show, that changed fashion, because at that point you think I want that piece of clothing so why wait for a magazine to show you this three months after you established the desire? So magazines are now out of that loop; they’re no longer needed. Magazines are there to show amazing fashion photographs and regrettably a lot of them have forgotten that. They need to invest in amazing photography and image making if they want to maintain their place because that’s the only raison d’être of fashion magazines nowadays. If they don’t support great fashion imagery and don’t get behind that, there won’t be a future for them. Whenever I shoot a story for a magazine, I see it on Instagram before I ever see it in the actual magazine.

    On what’s next in fashion filmmaking

    We get sent at least one fashion film every day at SHOWstudio from somewhere in the world and the best fashion filmmakers are from Asia and Russia. North America doesn’t understand fashion film yet. They think it needs to have a narrative but fashion film is as different from film as fashion photography is from photography. It’s about showing a piece of clothing, not telling a story. All filmmaking needs a narrative but fashion filmmaking is not about a narrative. If you look at the history of cinema in US and Europe, it’s more narrative driven, but in Russia and Asia it’s not. There’s a very different history of filmmaking in Asia and Russia and you see that clearly in fashion films now.


    South China Morning Post
     
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  11. tigerrouge

    tigerrouge don't look down

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    Nobody in the industry needs to hire a consultant - they just need to listen to Nick Knight.
     
  12. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    I've just typed up a long rant in Vogue Spain's thread referencing him, then removed it! Lol.
    I mean honestly, do they really expect that cover to land in Instagram and entice readers to invest into it beyond just the click of a like?
     
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  13. EstefaniaAbaddon

    EstefaniaAbaddon Well-Known Member

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    I don't always agree with him (and it's funny to see him talking about sexualized fashion when he did some extremely sexual photoshoots himself - just recently Jenner's shiny nips) but he is right. Magazines need to improve their photography content. I buy less and less magazines and only if I find the photography deserving. I spent an hour in a big newstand today, went through a lot of magazines and I felt more compelled to drop 15/20€ on Muse or Dust than on any Vogue. It's disastrous.
     
  14. Fiercification

    Fiercification Well-Known Member

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    Nick Knight, always speaking the truth.
     
  15. dodencebt

    dodencebt Well-Known Member

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    Vogue Runway Is Charging Some Brands to Post Their Collection Images
    Vogue now includes brands that pay a $20,000 fee on its fashion week hub, displaying images from their shows alongside better-known labels selected by the magazine’s editors.


    NEW YORK, United States — Brands looking to join the likes of Gucci and Chanel in Vogue Runway’s online index of fashion week collections can finally do so — for a fee.

    Joining Vogue Runway’s index of designers and brands is seen in the industry as a stamp of legitimacy, dating back to its origins as part of Style.com in 2000. The site now boasts 2.5 million unique visitors during an average fashion week, and the title says its Vogue Runway app has been downloaded more than 1.8 million times. Images from hundreds of shows are posted each season, often hitting the web minutes after models walk down the runway.

    But now for $20,000 a year — and pending Vogue editor approval — a designer or brand can have their lookbook or collection images uploaded to Vogue’s Runway website and app twice annually, according to a term sheet reviewed by BoF. The option has been available for at least three seasons, according to a source with knowledge of the publication’s strategy, and does not include reviews or other written content.

    It’s unclear how many designers have taken Vogue up on its offer, as brands that pay to be featured are not demarcated in any way. During the Spring 2019 ready-to-wear season for womenswear, Vogue Runway listed about 480 brands, according to the site’s index, versus about 445 the same season two years prior. While Vogue Runway previously only featured images of collections it also reviewed, that is no longer the case in recent seasons.

    “Experts and brands will always prioritise using and referring to the genuine, ‘clean’ image directly from Getty, Imaxtree, or Vogue,” said a content strategist who works with fashion publishers. “I think the past five years has proven that ... the brand equity that Vogue has is parallel to few.”

    Vogue is seen as the most valuable title in Condé Nast’s portfolio, and the US edition is leveraging its authority in the eyes of brands and readers to generate revenue in new ways during a challenging time for the publisher. Vogue is in the process of rolling out a new membership programme for readers, for example, with tiered pricing models reaching as high as $100,000 per year. Offerings will include exclusive content and access to the magazine’s editors and exclusive events.

    At Vogue Runway, images are the limit for pay-for-play coverage, said a source with knowledge of Vogue’s approach. Brands and designers cannot pay to have their collections reviewed or covered editorially elsewhere on the Runway vertical. (Sponsored content does appear regularly on the main Vogue website, however.) And the Vogue Runway team, led by director Nicole Phelps, still has final say over which brands can pay to be part of the index and which images will be accepted.


    For many of the brands found on Vogue Runway, coverage goes back as far as 1999 thanks to rich archives inherited from Style.com. In 2015, Conde Nast announced it was closing Style.com and moving its archive, content and some staff over to the newly created Vogue Runway vertical under Vogue.com. Costly plans to turn Style.com into an e-commerce destination for Condé Nast’s portfolio titles never fully launched. The project was scrapped and the intellectual property and other assets sold to Farfetch in 2017.

    Vogue and Condé Nast are seeking new ways to generate revenue as the company seeks to return to profitability following heavy losses in 2017. The company put Brides, W and Golf Digest up for sale and halted publication of Glamour’s monthly print magazine. The company is in the process of merging with its London-based sister publisher, Condé Nast International, and the search is on for a new global chief executive officer.

    businessoffashion.com
     
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  16. TZ001

    TZ001 Well-Known Member

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    Vogue Runway needs money for photographers and writers.
     
  17. axiomatic

    axiomatic Active Member

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    https://nypost.com/2019/01/23/vogue-magazine-to-go-behind-paywall/

     
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  18. axiomatic

    axiomatic Active Member

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    https://nypost.com/2019/01/24/who-made-hearsts-decision-to-kill-bryan-singer-story/

    Really embarrassing for Esquire/Hearst, especially after a magazine like the Atlantic publishes it..
     
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  19. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    To be honest, I didn't even know Singer was involved with Bohemian Rhapsody since I didn't care for the film to begin with. Can't believe so many gay magazines supported this film knowing Singer was involved. Stories about him has been going around for years.

    Not surprised Esquire killed the story though. Their reputation since #MeToo has been a bit shaky. They may have redeemed themselves somewhat with an exposé of that magnitude and Fielden probably knew that. That the story ended up developing to the point of completion shows that it's not actually on Fielden at all. The studio probably stepped in and threatened a ban on the entire company from upcoming coverage of their talent. Unlike The Atlantic, Esquire is part of a family of magazines who rely heavily on celebrities. It's an impossible situation, but not a good look for the company. This is why I miss Graydon Carter. He would never have killed a story like this regardless of the consequences. See Tom Cruise.
     
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  20. axiomatic

    axiomatic Active Member

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    https://nypost.com/2019/01/28/conde-nast-to-launch-vogue-business-digital-magazine/

     
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