The Business of Magazines #4

Discussion in 'Magazines' started by Thread Manager, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. 8eight

    8eight Well-Known Member

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    Its a mainstream fashion magazine which people buy at a train station or supermarket and maybe the team forgot that and tried to make it 'too cool' and 'edgy'.

    Personally I think it was over designed and although I loved some of what they were doing, i think the great general public don't want Slick Woods shot from below, or a collage of Taylor Swift as a cover.
     
  2. jorgepalomo

    jorgepalomo Well-Known Member

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    The Vogue Greece debut issue is sold out at CNWWN
     
  3. Blayne266

    Blayne266 Well-Known Member

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    I also saw the EIC post something about it being sold out in Greece and that there’s a second printing coming.
     
  4. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    The Repurposing of a Vogue Editor
    By Karin Nelson

    April 9, 2019

    After almost 20 years at the magazine, Tonne Goodman is cutting loose. Her memoir will be published next week.

    [​IMG]
    Tonne Goodman at home in Greenwich Village.Daniel Arnold for The New York Times

    Tonne Goodman has a mantra for when things start to get a little messy: “This is happening for a reason.” She is known for saying it on fashion sets when a model calls in sick or a runway look is stuck in customs.

    And also when far more serious situations arise, like when she was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 44. She finds it reassuring because, as she explained, whatever then happens is some kind of fate, and in that lies mystery and curiosity. Often, it leads you on a better path.

    Certainly, Ms. Goodman whispered the mantra aloud last summer when it was decided, by the powers that be, that she would surrender her role as fashion director of Vogue, where she had worked for nearly 20 years, and become a contributing editor — a growing trend, these days, in the struggling magazine industry. Without a doubt, she has found herself on a curious new path.

    “My overriding feeling is this is exciting,” she said, seated on a white slipcovered couch in her Greenwich Village apartment, where she has lived for two decades. But her “inner feeling,” she said, is something like fear.

    Dressed in her crisp, unwavering wardrobe of white Levi’s, Italian driving loafers and a silk Charvet scarf wrapped precisely around her neck, Ms. Goodman cuts a rather cool figure. From afar, she is the reserved, aloof foil to the colorful Grace Coddington, another Vogue editor. In practice, though, she is “the nicest” of the magazine’s editors, as many of those who have worked with her attest.
    [​IMG]
    Ms. Goodman's memoir, “Point of View.”

    While at Vogue she is known for styling her subjects in a classic, clean-cut manner — “the practical woman,” as she put it — Ms. Goodman said that she loves “to do crazy things.”

    Gabriella Karefa-Johnson, who assisted Ms. Goodman for four years at Vogue before becoming the style director of Garage magazine, said: “She’s quiet and not bombastic and wears a uniform every day, but Tonne changed this industry and the way Americans look at fashion. Tonne is rad. She is the definition of radical.” And in this new phase of her life, Ms. Goodman, 66, seems eager to reveal as much.

    Cue her forthcoming book, “Point of View,” which features, on an opening page, a full-frontal of Ms. Goodman, from her modeling days.

    Sam Shahid, the book’s art director and a longtime friend, sneaked the nude in, and for a while tried to hide it from her, but Ms. Goodman loved the idea. “One assumes this is just another fashion editor’s book, and it’s not,” she said.

    Granted, it is filled with one gorgeous and iconic image after another, stretching from her early days as a fashion reporter for The New York Times through her seminal stints as vice president for advertising at Calvin Klein and fashion director of Harper’s Bazaar, to her tenure at Vogue, during which she styled more than 150 covers.

    It is also quite personal, revealing pictures and anecdotes from her days growing up on the Upper East Side, the daughter of an artist and a surgeon, both of whom — not surprisingly — were attractive and stylish. Her mother wore a floor-length circle skirt for dinner every night, paired with cashmere and pearls. Her father would change into a green velvet smoking jacket. According to family lore, the photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt proclaimed them the handsomest couple in New York.

    [​IMG]
    Ms. Goodman styled Amber Valletta with wings for a 1993 shoot by Peter Lindbergh for Harper's Bazaar.

    There are also striking photos of Maarten, a Dutch sailor with whom Ms. Goodman ran off to sea for four months at the age of 17; and Rob, a troubled waiter she fell madly for and followed to the desert.

    She does not include images of Bailey Gimbel, the man she married and with whom she had two children, though she does mention their split. In fact, she touches, sparingly, on several searing aspects of her life, among them her bout with cancer, which coincided with the end of her marriage; and the time she feared she was having a miscarriage while in Paris for the collections.

    The photographer Mario Testino, whom she didn’t know well at the time, drove her in his Fiat Cinquecento to the hospital, where they learned that her son, Cole, now 25, was alive and well. Mr. Testino became his godfather.

    “It’s all part of my fabric,” she said of including such intimate details. “The reason any photo shows up is because of what I experienced.” She recalled one particularly emotional picture, shot by Peter Lindbergh during her Harper’s Bazaar days. It features Amber Valletta running through the city wearing a set of wings.

    “I was pregnant with Cole at the time,” said Ms. Goodman, who also has a daughter named Evie. “This was my angel.”

    [​IMG]
    Ms. Valletta, photographed by Steven Klein and styled by Ms. Goodman for Vogue in 2008.Steven Klein

    When it came to the book’s cover, Evie, an artist, balked at the idea of using the very classic and minimalist David Sims image of Daria Werbowy in a Calvin Klein gown. “She thought it was too obvious,” Ms. Goodman said. “That it didn’t reflect all of me.” Alas, Evie’s racier pick, a Steven Klein photo of Ms. Valletta looking like a 1960s housewife who is up to no good, was nixed.

    “It’s actually one of my favorite pictures,” Ms Goodman said. “But it didn’t look like me.”

    If Ms. Goodman’s creative output is, in part, a reflection of her life, it appears that she is having a ball these days. With Ms. Karefa-Johnson, she styled a rollicking evening wear story called “Black Cotillion” for Garage magazine.

    “We had these divine girls and a brilliant hair and makeup team,” Ms. Goodman said. “It was just a blast.”

    She also stepped in front of the lens — something she was never comfortable doing, even as a model — for the spring fashion issue of New York magazine. In it, she posed alongside Ms. Karefa-Johnson, whom she recently referred to on Instagram as her best friend, each of them charmingly wearing clothes that the other had chosen.

    Then, during this past fashion week, Ms. Goodman popped up on the runway for the first time since the summer after her sophomore year in high school, taking a turn for CDLM, the buzzy new label from Chris Peters, one half of the Creatures of the Wind twosome. She wore a blanket scarf and cowboy boots, which had a higher heel than what she prefers to wear. Still, she was happy to be there.

    “I wanted to support them,” she said of the label, all of it made from repurposed material, whether recycled or dead stock. “And the collection was so chic.”

    Ms. Karefa-Johnson believes this is just the beginning. “It’s kind of like how Stella got her groove back,” she said. “Everyone wants a piece of Tonne, and she holds the power of entering the fashion scene in a whole new way.”

    As for what’s next, Ms. Goodman is tossing around a host of ideas. Among them, a second book, called “Killed,” with all the fabulous shots that never made it into Vogue; and a sustainable capsule collection for Calvin Klein.

    “I feel there is a huge opportunity for a large brand to embrace sustainability in a way that is uncompromising,” she said. “And Calvin is the definition of American fashion. Period. The end.”

    And, she added, with a smile, “I think it would be really fun.”

    source | nytimes
     
  5. Xone

    Xone Well-Known Member

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    Anyone knows or have the info on how spanish magazines perform? in tern of sells?
    Thanks
     
  6. 8eight

    8eight Well-Known Member

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    Farrah Storr is the new editor of UK Elle.
     
  7. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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    Might as well fold UK Elle now. For heaven’s sake.
     
  8. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    I'll wait for her debut issue before I pass judgement because I quite like UK Cosmo's covers. It's not as sexy as the brand's signature, it's actually somewhat conservative. More like a Red hybrid. It would be interesting to see how her Elle will sit next to Justine's Harper's.
     
  9. moonmoon

    moonmoon Member

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    Vogue Italia have new Creative Director - Ferdinando Verdure

    His first issue will be July 2019
     
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  10. tigerrouge

    tigerrouge don't look down

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    I also like what she does with UK Cosmo's covers - they follow a predictable formula, but it's a formula that probably has a strong commercial appeal, which I won't knock.
     
  11. caioherrero

    caioherrero Well-Known Member

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    Why they fired Anne?
     
  12. MDNA

    MDNA Well-Known Member

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    Ferdinando Verderi is the new creative director for Vogue Italia.

    Source: WWD
     
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  13. axiomatic

    axiomatic Well-Known Member

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    Vogue, Vanity Fair Staffs Squeezed Again

     
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  14. axiomatic

    axiomatic Well-Known Member

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    Cosmopolitan U.K. Names Claire Hodgson Editor in Chief

     
  15. axiomatic

    axiomatic Well-Known Member

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    Anna Wintour on Meghan Markle, the 2020 Election and Condé Nast’s New Global CEO

     
  16. caioherrero

    caioherrero Well-Known Member

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    Anna Wintour, please go away. Leave Vogue with dignity
     
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  17. axiomatic

    axiomatic Well-Known Member

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    Pride Media CEO Quits Amid Ongoing Editorial Pay Issues

    Interesting move...
     
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  18. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Tonne Goodman on Ushering Celebrity, Drama, and Attainable Luxury into 'Vogue'

    The legendary editor gets real about working with Mario Testino and Steven Meisel, and styling everyone from the 90s "supers" to Kim Kardashian.

    By GABRIELLA KAREFA-JOHNSON

    Apr 19 2019, 3:48pm

    • Point of View tackles the enormous task of shedding light on a career that has quietly and at times uproariously (remember that paradigm-shifting Beyoncé cover?) informed the way that Americans consider and consume fashion media. With over 170 Vogue covers and 363 pages of iconic fashion to her name, the book is poised to become a go-to tabletop reference and sold out almost instantly, with the exception of a few copies set aside for the likes of Anna Wintour, Annie Leibovitz, Gigi Hadid, and Marc Jacobs, all of whom stopped by to support their friend and frequent collaborator.

      Okay, in the spirit of journalistic integrity, now is probably the point at which I can confess that I—the president of the Tonne Goodman fan club and her former assistant—may be biased. Just before the opening, I rang up everyone’s favorite editor to spill some tea.

      Gabriella Karefa-Johnson: Where to even start? The beginning is probably right. Why do you think art school didn’t work out for you?

      Tonne Goodman: Well, I think that [painter] Harry Soviak did a very good job telling me I wasn’t going to be an artist! He was the most caustic guy. And you know he was right! At school, I lived in a house with two other girls. One of them was named Carol and she was such a wonderful character and she would just be drawing and drawing and drawing and everyone was uglier than the next and so on, and so on, and finally it would come to be this beautiful drawing. And that part was something I couldn’t do. If I drew something and I didn’t find it aesthetically pleasing, I wouldn’t turn it in. I couldn’t. And that process is very important for an artist. And that was it!


      GKJ: Thank god(dess) that you found your way to fashion because so many of the images that the collective “we” come back to time and time again were yours. I love seeing those first appearances of the ‘90s supers in your book.

      TG: You know, they were all over the place. When they were being supermodels everyone took pictures of them. One of the things that I felt badly about with Christy Turlington is that most of the major Vogue pictures happened when I was atHarper’s Bazaar so there are very few in the book. But there’s a lot of Calvin (Klein) that made it in.

      GKJ: I imagine this book might feel a bit like an artist’s mid-career survey show. It could be conflicting, like you’re saying goodbye to something that you’re smack-dab in the middle of.

      TG: It is kind of conflicting. But really it’s just amazing because of the sheer volume—the amount. You think, did I really do that many? And then of course you come across the picture from way back when and you think, “Oh, I remember that day.”

      GKJ: At the time, did you know that the other young creatives you were working with were partners with which you could create a powerful body of work?

      TG: No, you don’t. You’re just doing your job and that really was my motivation. I had a job to do. That was the bottom line. The fact that I encountered all of these wonderful people along the way was luck. When you have people that you have a good time with, and want to create something with that’s more than just an image, the working relationships form naturally. Mario was the perfect example and a great partner. We would meet the day before a shoot until three o’clock in the morning if we had to, trying on every look, accessorizing, arguing over whether that stocking should go with that dress or not.


      GKJ: I think most people want to live in your pictures. Because they really do represent achievable fantasy and luxury—a lot of that I think has to do with the locations you shot. The access that you had during the Vogue years is incredible!

      TG: You see the power of Vogue but also don’t forget that earlier on, like myHarper’s Bazaar days, you were your own producer. You got yourself to set, you scouted your location, you did not have the huge teams behind your pictures but the expectation was the same as it is now. And that was good training. At Vogue, the access is incredible. You could get to the Wild Wall in China; you could get to the American Pavilion at the Venice Biennale with Mark Bradford before the fair opens. You could open doors-- and doors that needed to be opened.

      GKJ: Did you ever think you’d be the kind of editor that would create some of the most iconic images in the fashion photography canon? If you think back to when you were starting out, when these pictures that we all know and love were being made, did you have a sense of what power they could hold?

      TG: No, I don’t think so. I never thought I would be the one that was producing the memorable shoots. I happily accepted that that Grace [Coddington] held that spot. And I wasn’t doing, you know, the stopper pictures that Phyllis [Posnick] did. I was really there to show the clothes that you could, kind of, wear. My work at Vogue with Steven Meisel was very much about “clothes.” Those pictures came from a different collaboration than what I had with Mario because we would put on a kind of basic element of the outfit and then, in the studio, on either side of the set we’d line the accessories tables with all of the shoes, and all of the belts, and all of the hats, and all of the jewelry and literally go step by step. It was really the discovery of a look.


      GKJ: Your book is so incredible because every image is just as much a Steven Klein picture as it is a Tonne Goodman picture and I’m not sure that will always exist. What is equally amazing is that there isn’t just one type of identifiable Tonne Goodman style. Sure, you’re known as the architect of this kind of modern Americana aesthetic but you’re always experimenting and showing us new sides of you in your work.

      TG: Did you see the Kim Kardashian cover that I just did with Mikael Jansson?

      GKJ: I love those pictures because they represent exactly what I was referring to before. They’re not Tonne Goodman doing Kim Kardashian, they just look like Kim Kardashian. And that’s because celebrity (which you ushered into the Voguecover vernacular) and drama, and sex, are all parts of your DNA as an editor. We tell it’s your picture as easily as we can tell that a picture of Daria Werbowy in the studio is your picture.

      TG: Well that is certainly a compliment. It’s not a perfect match but it works. You know that’s a bit of what happened when we were deciding what would go on the cover. Have you heard that story? Well, my daughter, Evie, saw the current cover and she thought, “It’s just too predictable. This is exactly what everybody thinks of you. It looks like you can’t do anything else and there’s more to it than that.” It’s just that the applications in a picture like the one we choice can go anywhere.

      GKJ: You have got to tell me where that nude of you in the book came from.

      TG: Well, you know, I was always walking around naked.

      GKJ: Say more!

      TG: The situation was that I was great friends with Nicky Vreeland at that time and his mother and Peter Thompkins invited me down to Miami to stay with them. I mean, the best thing about that photograph is the bush.

      GKJ: I’m guessing this was in the….70’s?

      TG: Don’t forget that a bikini wax in those days was like a little trim just around the suit.

      GKJ: Other emblems of the 70’s in this book: hot, long-haired men. I mean, your section on Maarten, the sailor you fell for on vacation and ended up living with on a sailboat?! Heaven. I didn’t realize that you were such a man-killer. You literally had the hottest boyfriends.

      TG: You know what? I never really thought about it
    Garage Magazine
     
  19. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    I find the relationship between Tonne and Gabriella very interesting and so authentic. It's not just with this interview, they attend a lot of parties together and always piggyback on each other's interviews with outlets. We don't see that often in fashion as most editors seem to have a superficial relationship with their proteges. When Gabriella started at Garage I could not see how she's a Tonne protege because her aesthetic was very different as it should be. But with more of Tonne's experimental edits in Vogue lately, it is becoming more apparent. It does give me the impression that her earlier work may have been too formulaic.

    Also, very big of her to admit what sort of spot the took on at US Vogue, which doesn't necessarily mean her work is less worthy than that of Grace or Camilla's. There's a charm to the aesthetic of all three.
     
  20. Srdjan

    Srdjan Well-Known Member

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