The Business of Magazines #4

Discussion in 'Magazines' started by Thread Manager, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. axiomatic

    axiomatic Well-Known Member

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    ^^
    Well to start, CN can quit mailing all of their magazines in plastic bags. Reminds me of when Porter had their anti-plastic issue and then was back to sending the mag in a bag the next month.
     
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  2. tigerrouge

    tigerrouge don't look down

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    In the UK, Conde Nast already do that - subscriptions now come in a 'starchy' biodegradable bag that you can re-use to collect your food waste in, before it goes into your compostable bin.

    It's a recent development, but a good one.
     
  3. Srdjan

    Srdjan Well-Known Member

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    US Cosmo with Normani on the cover is their December/January (or Decembruary how they call it) issue. Doesn't sound good, but expected.
     
  4. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    With Glamour Italy Saying Arrivederci, What About the Other Editions?

    Here's a rundown of all of Glamour's other issues, including the U.S., Brazil and Iceland.

    By Kathryn Hopkins on December 2, 2019

    For decades, Glamour was a huge money-maker for Condé Nast, with the success of the 80-plus-year-old U.S. edition leading to around 16 international versions.

    In recent times, however, Glamour has been pivoting worldwide as it adjusts to the new media landscape and seeks to make up for the plunge in its advertising revenue.

    The latest casualty was Glamour Italy, which Condé Nast Italy revealed last week would shutter both its print edition and digital offering after 27 years in business.

    Explaining the reasoning behind the decision, Condé Nast Italy chief executive officer Fedele Usai said his focus is to create products “to accompany our public in the future.”

    But what has happened to all the other versions of the vast Glamour empire? Here, WWD provides a handy scorecard on which are still in print, which have become digital-only publications — and which have gone to that great magazine graveyard in the sky.

    U.S.

    Glamour ceased its regular glossy print edition at the beginning of the year in favor of “special” editions, with its focus now being digital. It also holds the annual Glamour Women of the Year Summit and an accompanying celebrity-filled awards show, as well as having a few podcasts under its belt.

    Digital: 6.3 million unique users

    U.K.

    In 2017, Glamour U.K. — once a jewel in the crown of Condé — reduced its print frequency from monthly to twice a year as part of an overhaul and is now a digital-first publication. It also runs the Glamour Beauty Festival.

    Print readership: 350,000

    Digital: 2.1 million unique users

    Turkey

    A print and digital Turkish version of Glamour was launched in 2016 through a license agreement with Dogus Media Group. It has since been shuttered and Condé now only has Vogue and GQ in Turkey.

    South Africa

    Launched in 2004, Glamour South Africa has a monthly print edition, a digital site and the Woman of the Year awards.

    Print readership: 420,000

    Digital: 64,100 unique users

    France

    Condé now publishes a bi-monthly print edition of French Glamour, as well as its digital site, called Glamour Paris.

    Print readership: 735,200

    Digital: 1.5 million unique users

    Iceland

    When it began in 2015, it was the first international magazine franchise to debut in the Icelandic market. It is now mainly online with a biannual print edition, published through licensee 365 Media Group.

    Digital: 10,300 unique users

    Netherlands

    It has a monthly print edition and online, as well as National Glamour Day and the Glamour Beauty Festival.

    Print readership: 852,500

    Digital: 1.1 million unique users

    Russia

    Condé still publishes a monthly Glamour Russia print edition, as well as the Glamour Style Book print three times a year. Like, the U.S., it also has a Woman of the Year Awards, as well as Glamour Shopping Week, Glamour Best of Beauty and Glamour Influencers Awards.

    Print readership: 1.2 million

    Digital: Three million unique users

    Germany

    In addition to a monthly print edition and online, Glamour Germany runs Glamour Shopping Week, the Glamour Beauty Festival and the so-called Glammy Awards.

    Print readership: 1.6 million

    Digital: 1.8 million unique visitors

    Brazil

    Launched in 2012, Glamour Brazil has 10 print editions a year and a digital site. It also has its own version of the Glamour Women of the Year Awards.

    Print readership: 400,000

    Digital: 8.6 million unique users

    Poland

    Glamour Poland began in 2003, in partnership with licensee Burda GL Polska Sp. Z o.o. It still has a monthly print edition, as well as a myriad of events, including the Glammies, Glamour Girl of the Year and the Glamour Summer Camp.

    Print readership: 373,500

    Digital: 1.4 million unique users



    Bulgaria

    Published under license to S Media Team since 2009, Glamour Bulgaria has a bi-monthly print edition and a digital site.

    Print readership: 600,000

    Digital: 6,700 unique users

    Mexico/Latin America

    Condé Nast entered Mexico and Latin America with Glamour Magazine, but ceased its print edition last year and is now solely a digital publication. It also has Vogue, GQ and Architectural Digest in Mexico.

    Digital: 2.2 million unique users

    Spain

    Another European country that still has a monthly edition.

    Print readership: 344,000

    Digital: 6.3 million unique visitors

    Hungary

    The monthly magazine and website are part of Condé Nast International and published through a deal with regional media company Ringier Axel Springer.

    Print readership: 77,700

    Digital: 1.3 million unique users


    Romania

    Established in 2006, the Romanian edition is published under a license agreement with Black Ink Publishing. In addition to a quarterly print magazine and online, it has a National Glamour Day and the Glamour Beauty Festival.

    Print readership: 59,000

    Digital: 79,300 unique visitors

    WWD
     
  5. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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    Because GLAMOUR is a redundant magazine for countries with VOGUE, and Allure. The market is oversaturated with similar magazines produced by the same company.
     
  6. Srdjan

    Srdjan Well-Known Member

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    Jeez! Had no idea Italian Glamour is closing! It was quite popular here in Serbia during the 00s.

    In addition to this magazine and the Polish ones which we heard about recently, I have also read that Lithuanian and Finnish Cosmopolitan editions are closing after 20 years of being present in the market. No matter how irrelevant these magazines are to the global market, it truly is devastating news. I guess there's more to come.
     
  7. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Just because Glamour is closing in Italy doesn't necessarily mean Farneti will get more buyers. To the contrary, it means he should actually be more alert to the risk of losing readers with his careless direction.
    You really have to understand how criminally mismanaged Glamour Italia must have been if they had to shut down while Elle and Vanity Fair still publish weekly with original content and no less than 180 pages. That right there tells you that the problem cannot be with 'people moving away from print', but with the product and how it's being managed.

    I do agree that at the core, Glamour is a tool which lost it's usefulness. I'm not a fan of British Glamour, but when you think of it they were really clever to revamp into a beauty-centric magazine because it's not really something we have on UK newsstands, and the beauty business is tremendously popular right now.
     
  8. Xone

    Xone Well-Known Member

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    well, Brazil and Spain looks that it's working well...but yes, magazine needs to find their purpose in order to keep existing...
     
  9. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Posting this for people that might be interested in
    further reading beyond just fashion.

     
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  10. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Inside The World of Interiors, Condé Nast’s Secret Weapon

    By Steven Kurutz
    Dec. 4, 2019, 4:10 p.m. ET


    LONDON — To be a magazine reader these days is to lament — unless you are reading The World of Interiors, published since 1982 by Condé Nast Britain but widely available on American newsstands, where it sells for $9.99 per issue.

    The World of Interiors is essentially a decorating magazine, but this is like saying Vogue concerns itself with sewing. It showcases seemingly every facet of the decorative arts and crafts over centuries, from the pop artist Roy Lichtenstein’s Manhattan studio to an antique dealer’s 16th-century Shropshire pile to a shepherd’s hut, while reviewing books like “The People’s Galleries: Art Museums and Exhibitions in Britain 1800-1914.” It’s intelligent, witty and wide-ranging in its curiosity: a bible.

    And a rarity.

    Two decades after the internet changed everything, magazines mostly have yet to figure out how to thrive in a digital world. Details and Domino folded. Glamour, Seventeen, Vibe, Self and Playboy have either retreated from print altogether or appear on newsstands infrequently. Titles once so culturally influential they created mythologies around them — Time, Sports Illustrated, Rolling Stone — have been supplanted by social media and blogs, and are sometimes so thin with advertising and editorial pages as to look like brochures.

    Nicholas Coleridge, the outgoing chairman of Condé Nast Britain, recently published a memoir about the 30-year golden period for magazines, beginning in the 1980s, when ad revenue and circulation climbed year after year and editors brimmed with creative gusto. He titled it “The Glossy Years.” In 2017, the United States arm of Condé Nast lost more than $120 million and, to stem the bleeding, the publisher has closed or sold off several titles and subleased floors in its Lower Manhattan headquarters. New York magazine asked, What’s left of Condé Nast, even as it faces an uncertain future under Vox Media, its new owner. Rivals Hearst and Meredith face similar challenges.

    If one could even sell a magazine memoir of today, it might be called “The Getting-By Years”: slashed budgets, reduced staffs, a noticeable diminishing of not just financial resources but ambition and copy-editing.

    Except at The World of Interiors, which has lost none of its gloss and seems utterly unaffected by modern media trends. Other than a cursory if reasonably popular Instagram presence and website of inspirational indices, it’s not really on the internet, or trying limply to be “of” the internet as so many other legacy titles are.

    “It enjoys a semi-indie status among our titles,” said Albert Read, the managing director of Condé Nast Britain. The people who produce it, he said, “are all artistic bohemian types. It’s the antithesis to the data-driven digital attitude that we have to embrace in other part of our business.”

    Sitting in his wood-paneled office inside Vogue House, the publisher’s London headquarters, Mr. Read held up the October issue of The World of Interiors. It was thick as a phone book with ads and printed on heavy 100-gram wood-free coated paper, the most luscious, most expensive paper of any Condé title. The cover was a simple, enticing photo of the shaded veranda of a house in the Canary Islands, a Spanish archipelago off the coast of northwest Africa, with barely any typeface to muck it up.

    “It’s just such a beautiful thing,” Mr. Read said, biased but not wrong.

    The magazine’s readership is small, with a circulation of 55,000, but influential. It’s beloved by those in the creative and visual arts especially. Clare Waight Keller, the artistic director of Givenchy; Nicolas Ghesquière, Louis Vuitton’s creative director, whose Paris apartment was featured in the December 2012 issue; Alessandro Michele, the fashion director for Gucci, who uses The World of Interiors as inspiration for his collections — all longtime readers. So are Brad Pitt, Cate Blanchett and the photographer Tim Walker.

    Christopher Bailey, the president and former chief creative officer of Burberry, said that while The World of Interiors appeals to the fashion crowd, it’s not fashionable. “I’ve read magazines all my relatively grown-up life. And World of Interiors is the only magazine that I’ve kept and trooped around the world wherever I’ve lived,” he said. “There’s something about it that does not feel throwaway. It’s not trend-driven. It’s not of the moment.”

    Those who work in magazines read The World of Interiors with a mix of appreciation and envy. In an age when editors of monthlies must compete, seemingly impossibly, with the daily dopamine hits of ’grams and memes and TikToks, The World of Interiors appears to occupy an earlier, more dignified era.

    Founded in 1981, The World of Interiors now breaks every dumb rule of modern magazines. There are no celebrities on the cover (and rarely any inside). You don’t feel the hand of advertisers, publicists or digital panic on every page. The design is low-key, almost academic, without gimmicky typeface or colors pushed so that everything looks Disney fake. In fact, the photography is rather moody and in chiaroscuro tones, giving the empty furnished rooms a compelling, dreamlike quality.

    The World of Interiors isn’t concerned with showing readers how to achieve such-and-such a look or selling an aspirational dream. Who expects to one day live in the Queen Mother’s former residence? Still, the magazine has never come across as snobby, because three pages after Clarence House can come, say, the house-turned-museum that an African-American couple, a poet and her postal-worker husband, built in Lynchburg, Va., in 1903 and decorated with recycled materials and great flair. Or an ice hotel in Sweden. Or a mobile home.

    The magazine’s point-of-view is distinct, even wacky. And inventive: Though product pages typically consist of clip art on a white background, The World of Interiors will collect the latest fabrics and drape them across a farm field in the Cotswolds.

    Print is dead. Only it isn’t. How does The World of Interiors still exist?

    The World of Interiors is produced in a corner of the second floor of Vogue House, the publisher’s drably charming brown-brick building in central London. The office is one largish room with deeply scuffed wood floors, a drop ceiling and windows overlooking green Hanover Square. On a recent morning, the magazine’s editor, Rupert Thomas, was meeting with the art director, Mark Lazenby, to finalize feature layouts for an upcoming issue.

    The men stood in the center of the office over a white tabletop that, on closer inspection, revealed itself to be a dormant light box for viewing photographic transparencies. No other magazine in the building, or practically anywhere else, used a light box anymore, having switched to digital photography.

    “We still commission on film,” said Mr. Thomas, a note of pride in his voice.

    The light box, along with the shelves and desk cubbies stuffed with books and the paperwork lying everywhere, gave the impression of a publishing office from an earlier time — if not the days of clacking typewriters then the ’90s at least, when producing a magazine was more tactile and everyone’s main concern was what would go into next month’s issue, not whether there would be one.

    A thin, bespectacled man of 53, Mr. Thomas had on wool trousers paired with a green corduroy blazer and blue cloth tie, and exuded an air of bookish intelligence and modest British eccentricity. If he wasn’t a magazine editor, you could imagine him teaching the Bloomsbury Group to students at a gently rundown art school.

    Mr. Thomas grew up in public housing in north London (his mother was a costumer) and joined the staff of The World of Interiors as a junior editor in 1992, after working for the art-book publishers Thames & Hudson and Dorling Kindersley. He became editor in 2000, only the second in the magazine’s 38-year history.

    His predecessor and the founding editor, Min Hogg, was a formidable figure whose father was the ear, nose and throat physician to the Queen Mother, and who ran with a bohemian London “in” crowd, including the actor Rupert Everett and the social gadfly and decorator Nicky Haslam.

    When Ms. Hogg died at age 80 this past June, the staff decorated the church where her memorial was held with 10-foot lavender gingham bows running to the altar. The World of Interiors also republished her Canary Islands home on the cover and carried a two-page dedication to her life by Mr. Thomas, who credited Ms. Hogg with defining the magazine’s approach (“‘Everything from palaces to pigsties’”) and with keeping it free from business-side meddling (“The much-quoted anecdote of Min throwing an ashtray at a hapless publisher is true…”). It was Ms. Hogg who essentially invented, through the magazine’s exquisitely crumbled aesthetic, the decorating style shabby chic.

    Mr. Thomas showed off what would be his office, had he chosen to sit apart from his staff and not at a cluttered desk alongside them following the example set by his predecessor. The adjacent room held a worktable strewn with fabric swatches, a sewing machine, back issues of the magazine, clothes on hangars, rolls of wallpaper stuffed into a closet.

    “This is our Jackson Pollock workroom,” Mr. Thomas said, a reference to the dried paint splatters on the threadbare carpet.

    Although Vogue House is shopworn on the whole, with old elevators and an in-house canteen employees call “the Hatch,” the World of Interiors office has a different degree of make-do, in keeping with its history. It wasn’t started by Condé Nast, but rather bought by the company back when it was published independently as Interiors and headquartered above a florist’s shop on Fulham Road.

    For years after, The World of Interiors shared office space with the Condé Nast circulation department in another building across town, leaving it physically and metaphorically apart. If the magazine wasn’t given great infusions of cash like its siblings, it was left largely alone by the executives, a trade-off that continues to this day and one Mr. Thomas, like Ms. Hogg before him, seems happy with.

    Mr. Thomas drank a cup of tea at the messy worktable and reflected on the industry’s “golden, halcyon days,” as he put it, when 25 models and 15 hair-and-makeup stylists would be flown to a glamorous and remote location for a shoot. “But we were never like that,” he said. “We’ve always been done on a shoestring.”

    The World of Interiors has a tiny staff of 13, many of whom have worked there for years, aging happily in place, after arriving in roundabout ways. Jessica Hayns, a 26-year veteran who as creative director oversees the fabric and furniture shoots, was formerly a textile designer. Carol Prisant, the New York editor, was an antique dealer who’d never written for magazines before she penned a query letter to Ms. Hogg and was hired, in 1989. All are skillful at multitasking and undaunted by traveling economy.

    If Simon Upton, one of the magazine’s star freelance photographers, is dispatched to the United States, he will be assigned two or three projects to make the trip cost-effective. And Mr. Upton travels light, which can flummox subjects accustomed to how other shelter magazines operate.

    Michelle R. Smith, an interior designer whose Brooklyn townhouse was featured in the February 2018 issue, recalled getting a last-minute email from the magazine saying Mr. Upton was in New York and could he come the next day?

    “I’m freaking out. Clearly there’s no stylist, no flowers,” Ms. Smith recalled, referring to the practice of primping a home before it’s photographed. The World of Interiors, by contrast, considers its mission to capture a truthful record of how people live, usually under natural light. As a bonus, the magazine saves thousands on equipment rentals and florists’ bills.

    Ms. Smith went on: “He just showed up by himself with a tiny bag. He said, ‘Don’t move anything.’ Do you want me to remove the remote control? ‘No.’ My sneakers are where I left them. The only styling I did was hide wires.”

    It’s common for magazines to commission stories only to kill them for one reason or another. Vogue and Vanity Fair are famous for the practice. The World of Interiors can’t afford such waste, so Mr. Thomas and his staff have developed a way of art-directing stories in advance, to work confidently and efficiently.

    Ms. Prisant described the process: “Rupert asks me to provide pictures of the four walls of a room that I might find interesting. Stand in the middle, turn in a circle and get the four walls. He lays out the whole shoot from England from that series of photographs. We can do a major shoot in a day.”

    Mr. Thomas said, “There’s something better than throwing money at a situation. And that’s throwing thought at it. You have to keep an eye on everything. Every crop of every picture. Every penny spent. You’re totally involved in the product. It’s never been enough for me to cruise through it and say, ‘They won’t notice.’ World of Interiors readers notice everything. And they write and tell you.”

    Like his staff, Mr. Thomas is frugal and workmanlike. He is not a celebrity editor in the Anna Wintour mold. His partner is Alan Bennett, the famous playwright and author of “The History Boys,” making him part of a London power couple, though he is loath to discuss his private life, or much else, with reporters. He rarely gives interviews, and The World of Interiors, unlike most magazines, doesn’t carry an editor’s letter or entreaties to follow him on social media.

    “Rupert’s not in it for the flash of Condé Nast or the Mercedes purring outside waiting to take him somewhere,” said Mr. Read, his boss. “He gets on the tube with his backpack. He conforms to this purist, almost monastic approach to the magazine.”

    When the digital-advertising apocalypse came for print in the last decade, gutting budgets along with staffs, The World of Interiors scarcely had to adjust. Budgets were neither reduced nor increased. And as always, the money scrimped from places where it didn’t show was spent in areas where it did, like continuing to shoot on film, printing on sumptuous paper and twice a year shipping a huge amount of furniture to Italy to be photographed inside a rented villa or castle.

    As other magazines were forced to cut corners, or cannibalize their print editions to feed the web, The World of Interiors grew lusher and more thoughtful by comparison. “The attention that goes into the photo captions — it’s a dying art,” said Fritz Karch, an antique dealer in New Jersey who used to work at Martha Stewart Living magazine and has read The World of Interiors since the mid-80s. “I have a friend who will quote his favorites. Because where today are you going to read, ‘Dried whippet over dusty silverware?’”

    The Instagram account was introduced well after the social media platform became popular, and only upon careful consideration of how to approach the medium, said Emma Redmayne, the magazine’s publisher. Very few stories are available on its website. To experience The World of Interiors, you still have to buy the print magazine.

    In October, the magazine unveiled The World of Interiors Index, an online directory of antique dealers, gallerists, upholsters and the like that will generate no great fortunes for Condé Nast. But readers and advertisers enjoy The World of Interiors as a print object. And it makes money as a print object, especially in Britain where there is still a robust newsstand culture and an appreciation for print (In 2019, ad revenue for The World of Interiors outperformed the market, Ms. Redmayne said. And with 43 percent of total circulation coming from subscriptions, it boasts the most loyal subscribers of any Condé title).

    So why start churning out clickbait like “5 Ways to Get the ‘Downton Abbey’ Look?” The World of Interiors is meant for a niche audience and the people who run it are fine with that.

    “It’s so successful as a business, and so solid, that I’m very wary of pushing them in directions they feel uncomfortable going in,” said Mr. Read. “I mean, if the World of Interiors circulation suddenly jumped to 150,000, I’d almost be worried.”

    All of which leaves Mr. Thomas in the unique position of editing a print magazine with a rosy future.

    “Our specialness is that we rather buck the trend,” he said. “In a very weird way, by being willfully noncommercial, we’ve made ourselves more commercial. If that makes sense.”

    source | nytimes
     
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  11. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    The Glossy Years by Nicholas Coleridge review – the rise and rise of a gilded youth

    Anthony Quinn
    Sun 20 Oct 2019 04.00 EDT

    Condé Nast supremo Nicholas Coleridge’s autobiography reveals a genial figure not afraid to name-drop


    While I would never look down on someone just because he’d been to Eton, there are times in Nicholas Coleridge’s memoir when one’s appetite for tales of the gilded life is sorely tried. Committee man and genial godhead of the Condé Nast magazine empire in its pomp, Coleridge swans and swanks about his Arcadian years with just enough self-deprecation to save him from being insufferable. But it’s a close-run thing.

    Equipped with the instincts and enthusiasms of a good journalist, he knows how to tell a story and when to move things along. The best part of The Glossy Years doesn’t involve his career at all – it’s his schooldays, usually the period of a memoir I find least involving. Born into a Forsyte-ish clan of moneyed patricians (his father was chairman of Lloyd’s), Coleridge describes his time as a deeply unpromising prep-school boy with a Waugh-like sense of the ludicrous. Without a gift for anything but scripture, “I was soon firmly embedded in the dimwits’ stream, along with barely English-fluent sons of ambassadors and a pair of bedwetting twins”. Later, at Eton, he and his great pal Craig Brown, another divinity scholar, slip bogus verses “from Isaiah or Ezekiel” into their essays and get a big tick from teachers who don’t bother to check the sources. Happy days and so long ago (early 1970s) that their other mate Charles Moore, future biographer of Mrs Thatcher, was canvassing for the Liberals.

    And how about this for a reminder of those barely credible times? Having squeaked into Trinity College, Cambridge, to read theology, Coleridge is invited by the master to a meet-and-greet for the alumni of “the top public schools”, where champagne is served. It transpires there are two more such parties, the second for those from the lesser public schools and grammars, where it’s red and white wine. The third is for the state sector, who would be served beer and cider. “It says a lot about us – and nothing good – that I don’t remember any of us finding anything odd in this arrangement.” It says quite a lot about Coleridge’s honesty that he mentions this at all. Many wouldn’t have. He is quite a strange mixture: in one way, the signet-ringed toff, in another, the raffish bohemian – like his hero David Bowie he took mime lessons from Lindsay Kemp. One detects a strain of camp in him not standard issue for his class.

    The combination won him admirers. At Harpers & Queen, he was taken under the wing of the inimitable Ann Barr (though he somehow fails to namecheck her beloved parrot, Turkey) and later helped Tina Brown transform Tatler from the in-house mag of deb-collectors and dowager aunts into a sleek, new “upper-class comic”. His cheek and his connections propel him onward. Hired by the Evening Standard as a feature writer, he got his first story at a birthday party in Windsor Castle, not among the chinless guests but by disguising himself in cap and uniform to hang out with the chauffeurs downstairs as they bitched and gossiped about their bosses. I had forgotten that it was Coleridge who also got the “14 pints a day” scoop from William Hague. Eventually, the siren call of the glossies lured him back: “I have always liked magazine people, with their defining characteristics of faddishness, alertness and a predilection for diva-like behaviour.” The feeling has plainly been mutual.

    As he rises to the top of the tree at Condé Nast, a blizzard of name-dropping sets in; the tone becomes more diplomatic and the book somewhat less interesting. For all his mischief, Coleridge is a company man right down to his (I’m guessing) monogrammed underpants and he won’t risk offending his influential circle. He isn’t a scintillating portraitist, even when his heroes are on view. He gets to see Bowie at Wembley and has this to say: “The show was brilliant, he played all the classic tracks.” He also has a bit of a tin ear. He recalls that the late GQ style editor John Morgan, who was gay, teetered on the brink of coming out “but never quite took the plunge”, an unfortunate expression, given the tragic thing about Morgan was that he fell or jumped to his death from his flat.

    He is gracious in paying tribute to his various PAs, nannies, colleagues, friends and wife (a psychic healer). And it’s hard to resist his Woosterish amiability. I was once leaving a London party with a friend, the exit being a long walk down to the road. As we set off, a chauffeur-driven Daimler stopped, the passenger door opened and Coleridge popped his head out: “Can I give you a lift?” We were perfect strangers but he budged up and we got in. I don’t recall anything we said – only his pinstripe suit, a mirthful air and a grin like a friendly alligator’s.

    • The Glossy Years by Nicholas Coleridge is published by Penguin (£25). To order a copy go to guardianbookshop.com or call 020-3176 3837. Free UK p&p over £15, online orders only. Phone orders min p&p of £1.99

    source | theguardian
     
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  12. TZ001

    TZ001 Well-Known Member

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  13. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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    ..they could've simply changed the CORE VALUES and PERSONNEL POLICY of Conde Nast. At least all magazines are included.

    This should be the policy of Conde Nast as an institution, and not Vogue alone.
     
  14. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Radhika Jones is the Editor of Vanity Fair

    Radhika Jones’ version of Vanity Fair has gotten people talking, at the very least.


    With the state of most magazines today, that in itself is a feat, but media types have been doing some grumbling since Jones’ editorial debut in March 2018. The covers have been less glam, the stories inside less juicy, the unrepentant tinge of high-end gossip that devotees expect less constant, some have said. But Vanity Fair is also a magazine operating under a new editor in chief (new to the magazine and to the role) and new budgetary constraints at what could now be termed the New Condé Nast. So the reasons are many for the clear changes to a magazine run by Graydon Carter for 25 years. Although plenty of the changes do boil down to the fact that Jones — relatively young; female; woman of color; Condé neophyte — is in charge now.

    “I did feel it was a responsibility to bring the magazine firmly into the present, into the future, if at all possible,” Jones said, sitting on the rooftop patio of the Four Seasons Beverly Hills.

    She’s in Los Angeles for a few days, hosting VF’s annual summit and planning to be on the set of a weekend shoot for the magazine’s all-important Hollywood issue. She won’t give away any details on the February cover, except an emphatic “yes” when asked if this year’s cover will look any different from the usual foldout of film and TV talent standing next to each other, wind machine blowing, in a muted palette of red carpet dress. Jones is here to talk about her first two years helming the magazine anyway, and she hews to the subject.

    She brings up her first cover, Lena Waithe, showing the writer from the chest up in a white T-shirt, apparently no makeup, a soft but unsmiling stare, gray background, and that’s all. Before that cover were Carter’s last three issues, the typical Hollywood Issue in February, Emily Blunt in full old-Hollywood glam mode in January and Jennifer Lopez and Alex Rodriguez in December with a cover exclaiming simply “J-Rod!” The Waithe cover was a complete 180, and people noticed.

    “Part of the decision [to depict Waithe on the cover] was I felt here’s someone who represents a lot of what is promising and great about contemporary culture…and it was exciting to think about her as a representation of what VF could be,” Jones explained. “What I thought about a lot is one of the core proponents of VF is it’s aspirational and what I felt was that aspirational is not static, it evolves and changes and I want to be able to capture a lot of different kinds of aspiration.”

    Although Jones says firmly that VF “has never been in the business of putting clothes on models,” it’s certainly been in the business of putting clothes on celebrities, and more than white T-shirts. But she defends her decision to take a much starker turn all at once as more modern, a move away from nostalgia, a sentiment she wants nothing to do with. So she went with Idris Elba in a T-shirt and a leather jacket, Kendrick Lamar in a hoodie, Michelle Williams in a conservative sweater — all lacking a smile or even a smirk.

    “I mean, who looks better in a tuxedo than Idris Elba, but I thought let’s see him looking different,” Jones said. “For Michelle Williams, shortly after that cover came out I went to Milan and Paris [for the shows for the first time] and I had lunch with Donatella Versace, which was great. And she was like, ‘I love that Michelle Williams cover. That is what a woman looks like in the modern world.’”

    So Donatella is a fan. And the magazine’s stats seem to be changing. Jones boasts her readers are getting a little younger, more engaged, more diverse and with a slightly higher household income. Followers on social media are up, too. VF’s May cover featuring short-lived presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke shot by Annie Leibovitz brought the site its most trafficked month with 25.7 million unique views. O’Rourke saying publicly after the issue came out that he regretted doing the cover at all as it “reinforced a perception of privilege” likely only helped the numbers and it remains the site’s most visited cover story. July was also a good month for traffic, 23.8 million views, with two covers of Daisy Ridley and Adam Driver on the set of “Star Wars.” Though they looked much more like movie promos than editorial covers, VF got an exclusive story on the upcoming installment of the “Star Wars” saga. Jones said subscriptions are up a bit, too, driven by digital, as VF is among the few Condé properties with a real paywall strategy.

    Even with some quantifiable successes under her belt by now, there is still a sense in media circles that the magazine is not as lively, exciting, enticing, as it has been over the years, even as Jones seems to be moving away from her initial stark covers to a softer type of more visible glamour, but one not led by traditional (i.e., male) ideas of sex appeal. See this year’s cover of Nicole Kidman and a family shoot of Chrissy Teigen and John Legend. Both of those covers look like they’re from a different editor altogether, compared to the Waithe issue. Sure, media naysayers may be old or set in their ways or simply enjoy rooting for competitors to fail, but Jones admits that she’s still finding her way at VF and that the criticisms have indeed reached her.

    “Any editor, you wake up in the morning and think, ‘Oh, why didn’t I do that better, how can we do that better next time.?’ That’s a natural state of being, so criticism from the outside world kind of slots into that.

    “I’m old enough to know that you don’t always get it exactly the way you want it the first time,” Jones continued. “The creative process, it is a process, but I am super happy with what we’re doing.”

    And she says her boss, Anna Wintour, to whom she reports directly, encourages her to try things out, see how they land, and find her own rhythm and style as an editor in chief.

    “That’s her whole m.o.,” Jones said of Wintour. “She wants people to be fearless and she wants people to make their own choices and she’s been incredibly supportive, from the moment I met her. But she has a high bar.”

    The most recent covers (Teigen and Legend, Lupita Nyong’o and Joaquin Phoenix) Jones is particularly pleased with — they look much different than most of her 2018 covers, more color, more relaxed, a little more playful. But there is a feeling in speaking with media folks — p.r.’s, reporters, even a few members of her own staff — that Jones is getting more criticism within the industry than men who have recently been given broader magazines to run. Like Michael Sebastian at Esquire (Hearst) and Will Welch at GQ (another Condé title). Even if they don’t like everything she’s done, these observers don’t feel the incessant chatter flowing through the New York media rumor mill about her job stability and her salary are quite fair.

    Asked bluntly if she feels the criticism leveled at her version of the magazine has anything to do with her being a woman, she turns the question around, a little annoyed but friendly, which she is. “You’re a woman, do you ever really know when something is gendered and when it isn’t?” She quickly admits that, yes, one can “puzzle it out,” but is adamant that whatever criticism she’s hearing isn’t acted upon.

    “In general, change is hard for people. I also think that when you have a situation where someone’s been the editor for 25 years, what people remember are the high points. They’re not remembering the issue that didn’t make an impression on them, because it didn’t make an impression on them. It’s natural and I don’t blame anyone for that.

    “I will say that I make the choices I make because of who I am, so to the extent that people think I’m not the right fit for the job or whatever…” she trails off.

    Speaking of who she is — as in the only current female editor of a general interest magazine and one of only a small few in history (who include the modern version of Vanity Fair’s first editor in chief, Tina Brown) — Jones in this context is aware that she’s in some kind of rarefied, gendered air. So how does it feel to be in such a position? She hesitates and says she’s hesitating “because it makes me feel a lot of different things.” Ultimately, she decides to say that being the person she is and the editor of Vanity Fair has given her the added privilege of “being a role model for other women.”

    “I say ‘role model’ only because other people say that to me and it never occurred to me that would be the case. And I feel like if I can help someone, another woman, another woman of color, feel like maybe she could do something she didn’t know she could do, I can’t really ask for anything more.”

    But this, too, is new for Jones, as are thoughts on what kind of leader she wants to be, and how much her identity does and should influence the type of work she’s doing now.

    “We’re much more conscious of who our gatekeepers are and who our pundits are and I now hold some of those positions and to be conscious of it is almost a responsibility at this point,” she said. “But it’s not like I approach every decision like, ‘As a woman I’m going to choose this layout.’ You can’t compartmentalize yourself like that.”

    Jones is trying to find some cross section of herself and Vanity Fair that works, consistently. When she does, it will likely still be one that doesn’t even attempt to satisfy the male gaze. She told a story of being young in grade school and finally getting glasses because she’s nearsighted. She remembered putting them on in class for the first time and looking outside at the trees.

    “I was like, ‘Has everyone been seeing trees like this, these very articulate branches?’”

    Her point is the inherent subjectivity of everything, with running a magazine being no exception.

    “I know for me,” Jones said, “my gaze is female, my gaze is being expressed in 2019, with all of our current context around us, and that’s how you have to operate.”

    source | wwd
     
  15. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Vogue makes it very easy for critics to point their daggers at them with these flashy proclamations.
     
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  16. tigerrouge

    tigerrouge don't look down

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    "Look to Vogue for how to keep up appearances with all the latest fashions, including ones in the business world."

    It used to be that Vogue set trends - now their hand is being forced by social attitudes into lip service proclamations regarding things they didn't care about for decades, even though values regarding environmentalism, consumerism and 'not abusing models' are nothing new. They haven't made these changes of their own volition.
     
  17. SophiaVB

    SophiaVB Well-Known Member

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    That Radhika interivew was lazy and, of course, just deviated to #sexism. Will Welch and Michael Sabastian deserve every critique for their direction as well since all three have completely sucked every ounce of glamour or fashion out of the publications. Hollywood = glamour!

    It's a sad state of affairs that the most trafficked cover was Pete Buttiegieg. Editors are mistaking virality with readership. It was shared excessively on social media because people were laughing at him or critiquing him as a political figure not because everyone suddenly wanted to buy subscriptions to VF. IMO the cover star shouldn't be overtaking the publication's brand.

    Isn't there something about her belief that women don't want to see glamour and dresses also a bit diminishing to women?
     
    Benn98 and tigerrouge like this.
  18. vogue28

    vogue28 Mod Squad Team Leader

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    Anne Fulenwider is leaving US Marie Claire:

     
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  19. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Oh wow, I'm gutted that she's leaving because she's surpassed herself as an editor over the past 5 years, yet at the same time it's a move which I fully support!! She will be missed!
    I do hope Kate Lanphear will take over because her stint at Maxim proved that she can edit a magazine. It was just a bad fit for the Maxim reader.
     
  20. Faith Akiyama

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    Did you mean Beto O'Rourke...? But yes, the fact that O'Rourke already dropped out of the race definitely testifies to the virality =/= efficacy factor.
     
    SophiaVB and axiomatic like this.

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