What Does Brexit Mean For Fashion In The UK? (PLEASE READ POST #1 BEFORE POSTING)

Discussion in 'Careers, Education & the Business of Fashion' started by anlabe32, Jun 24, 2016.

  1. anlabe32

    anlabe32 Well-Known Member

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    Moderator Note:

    Please be very careful in this discussion. Keep it on topic ... how Brexit might impact the fashion industry in the UK. Avoid political discussions or opinions about whether this is a good move or a bad move, the politicians involved, or how it will impact people in general. Discussing politics is not allowed anywhere in the Fashion Spot, per our Community Rules.

    Thanks!




    For both mass market and high fashion?

    I know it will be a while before everything is settled but I have a lot of questions.

    Are the clothes getting more expensive?
    Am I going to pay more for clothes from, for example, ASOS?
    Will some brands, like McQueen, stop showing in the UK and come back to Paris?
    Is London Fashion Week going to be less popular for models to walk?
    Will photographers who are based in London, like Mert & Marcus, base themselves elsewhere (now that equipment, luggage and everything will be harder to get into the country)?

    My knowledge of the business side of fashion is quite slim so I wonder about all these things. I read that for example the prizes of cars produced in the UK will increase with 10% for outside the UK.
     
    #1 anlabe32, Jun 24, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Jun 24, 2016
  2. sixtdaily

    sixtdaily Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if we can tell already. We have to wait until the British government discuss the terms of the exit... *** Edited: Please refrain from talking about political issues. See the Community Rules. ***
     
    #2 sixtdaily, Jun 24, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Jun 24, 2016
  3. Miss Dalloway

    Miss Dalloway Well-Known Member

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    *** Edited : Removing Response to deleted post. ***

    So many aspects of this will impact the Fashion Industry! From jobs, to import, and so many other parts. **** Edited: Please refrain from talking about political issues. See the Community Rules. ***
     
    #3 Miss Dalloway, Jun 24, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Jun 24, 2016
  4. AD011620

    AD011620 Well-Known Member

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    *** Edited: Please refrain from talking about political issues. See the Community Rules. ***

    I also think none of the people who voted had insight deep enough to make an informed choice... I don't know how it is going to affect fashion and if I am completely honest I don't think I even care when there are more pressing issues at stake...However, I believe being open was great for the British fashion industry (which really exploded during last 30 years) because it was open to creativity... now try and get a work permit for conceptual artists, etc. and prove Theresa May that having these people in the country is essential;-) all I can do is hope that things will work out okay for everyone... I think we are facing very challenging times and the last thing we need is falling apart. I am sorry, my comment might come across a little emotional but as an immigrant who worked, employed and paid more taxes than Starbuck in this country I feel a little bit let down.
     
    #4 AD011620, Jun 24, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Jun 24, 2016
  5. Miss Dalloway

    Miss Dalloway Well-Known Member

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    *** Edited: Please refrain from talking about political issues. See the Community Rules. ***

    As of now, things will unravel. Only once, and If a strong Prime Minister takes over, and is able to negotiate good laws which support easier way of doing business for UK brands things could be turned for the better. But it will never be the same for most brands. The freedom with which most companies operated, from hiring all over Europe, to exporting & producing their product? That all ends, there will be a much harder way now, and it will impact mostly the up and coming talent who don't have the help of huge powerful conglomerates behind them, to navigate through the obstacles that will face them! Young brands will feel it the most!Jobs will be lost, pay will decerease!

    And yes, the prices will most certainly go up, from pre production to finished product. I could see Burberry going back to showing in Paris, Stella never left so she will continue, McQueen will be back in Paris for sure! LFW will feel the impact the most, it always struggled, but now even more so than ever! Some models might not be able to walk in the shows, when all is said and done!

    Like i said, unless the new resolutions are reached that make things easier. ***Edited ***
     
    #5 Miss Dalloway, Jun 24, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Jun 24, 2016
  6. Nymphaea

    Nymphaea Well-Known Member

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    From WWW:
    wwd
     
    #6 Nymphaea, Jun 24, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Jun 24, 2016
  7. Nymphaea

    Nymphaea Well-Known Member

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    continued...
    wwd

    **** Edited *** ... just like KissMiss said. British fashion will suffer for sure.
     
    #7 Nymphaea, Jun 24, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Jun 24, 2016
  8. AD011620

    AD011620 Well-Known Member

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    Nymphaea Thank you for posting this article.
     
  9. squilliam

    squilliam Active Member

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    *** Edited ***
    I feel like this will have a negative effect on UK fashion. I wouldn't be surprised if the major brands start showing somewhere else. But apparently the leave is a 2 year process so we'll see
     
    #9 squilliam, Jun 24, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Jun 24, 2016
  10. Lola701

    Lola701 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Nymphaea for posting.

    *** Edited ***

    It will have an impact on British Fashion, mainly because it's a very "young designers" oriented industry compare to France and Italy.
    In the worst scenario, it will make UK fashion less attractive and force key players to show abroad.
    But i hope that they will have the support from the remaining countries. We don't need and we don't want UK to be isolated from the rest of the continent.
     
    #10 Lola701, Jun 24, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Jun 24, 2016
  11. And don't forget about the models. Agencies will have to figure things out as the girls will surely need a VISA and many girls that would only work in the EU due to it will most surely loose a big market. I believe that, on one side, Paris and Milan will benefit from this and get major contracts with British fashion houses but it will also collapse the modelling market as many models will face unnecessary logistical problems. Many Brazilian models, for example, will have to choose between the Paris/Milan and London as they can only afford one VISA and I think I know which one they will choose.
     
  12. MulletProof

    MulletProof Well-Known Member

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    I don't think the short-terms effects will be that drastic.. I mean, if anything, considering the way the pound looks right now, it should make things more accessible for a while..

    Also plenty of Russian models walking just fine in London catwalks.. I don't think the requirements will suddenly be harder for EU citizens? I don't know (really, I don't.. :lol::ninja:).

    The major effects will be in the long run, in 10-20 years time.. I think fashion education might resent that, but I don't think there's necessarily going to be a shortage, but the flow of EU students will now be on a par with those from Asia or the US (or anywhere else really), meaning that right now it is very hard and expensive to study in the UK and let's say that if you're American, you either need to get a good scholarship or come from a very stable background in order to afford that.. I'm speaking half in ignorance here but I think you could be from a relatively average/middle class background in France or Germany and relocate to the UK without gigantic sacrifices. Of course this group of people will find it harder now and will definitely think twice on seeking education and things like internships or part-time jobs to start a fashion career in the UK.. I guess other cities with a decent fashion industry but not that relevant like Berlin or Stockholm might be favored in this?. Who knows..

    I'm optimistic and I mentioned in that 'is fashion less interesting?' thread that all these xenophobic directions in different countries might actually impact fashion positively, considering fashion is a dead fish right now.. english fashion in particular can be so ridiculously creative and outspoken that they always manage to find routes in adversity to create thoughtful things and transform the whole industry... of course it is sad that it takes this, and it even takes lives, for society to stop and think about what went wrong and figure out what how to clean the mess, but frankly, and this isn't exclusive to the UK.. the inequality of education, living conditions, information sources, poor integration strategies, sensibility towards the background and ideas of a neglected sector no matter how stupid and bigoted it is.. that inequality and the many years that go by piling over without even being acknowledged as a problem that requires strong action.. it always comes back with a check and sometimes the price is so high, like in this case.

    What's amazing is that when there is presence by organizations and the government and educational institutions to prevent people in suburbs, industrial, working-class/highly vulnerable areas to be toyed by opportunistic political [strike]rats[/strike] interests and they offer opportunities to participate and start projects that are inclusive to experience things like art and fashion, and are basically just engaged and recognised by the capital, that's usually where really interesting things come from.. they rarely come from the city. It would be nice if fashion looked in that direction... or if, instead of hoping for the battle of the richest in UK education seats, they'd create more programs to inspire and integrate those in vulnerable situation.

    kind of singing kumbaya, I know.. hugs to all UK members :ninja: :heart:..
     
  13. Not Plain Jane

    Not Plain Jane Well-Known Member

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    i saw a few people saying, half jokingly but also seriously, "time to peruse UK shops and designers online, what with the pound dropping drastically!" - so maybe there'll actually be a rise in sales? ^_^

    hope it all works out for the best.
     
  14. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Kudos to my dearest Nick Knight, perhaps the only quote in that piece which struck a chord in me.
    A lot of Anlabe's questions simply cannot be answered just yet. But I think we shouldn't forget that the UK is still a thriving and profitable fashion market, second or third only to the US and China perhaps. It will not turn overnight into this barren landscape, with zero prospects. Spending power is still immense, and it would be foolish for anyone with levelheaded business acumen to close up shop regardless of the logistical implications. It's far too soon for this.

    Yes, I predict LFW will be even less prestigious now. And yet on the other hand, is it wise or even plausible for Vogue Germany not to send an editor off to cover LFW? What will it say about them? One cannot make marketing decisions with an emotional mindset.

    I also cannot see why the likes of M&M would uproot themselves. They'd still need to maintain a base in London, surely? I do think now, more than ever, fashion and politics will not only collide, but will manifest perhaps in the most interesting ways (bet you're gloating, Mulletproof! :wink:. Indies such as ID, Pop, perhaps even Love, might get interesting, because the type of material will certainly resonate with some.

    Sarah Burton designed the wedding dress of Duchess Kate. So I highly doubt McQueen would migrate to Paris. Same for Westwood. The latter would instead use LFW as a protesting platform, I'm sure.

    Ultimately, while I don't think this type of angst and impending austerity is any good for the man on the street, but it might actually do wonders for creatives. So I agree with Mulletproof in a way. I thought it was a disgusting thing to say, but then I remembered Balenciaga and a host of others produced the most provocative collections in an era of appalling wretchedness (the Iraqi/Afghanistan war).
     
  15. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for the jumbled post, just removed the overt political parts and posted.

    On a lighter note, since we are on such a divorcing high, can we now push for our own edition Vanity Fair??????
     
  16. MulletProof

    MulletProof Well-Known Member

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    :rofl: :rofl:..

    I was trying to be optimistic!

    But yeah 2003 will go down as one of my favorite years in fashion haha, everyone was so angry about the invasion and a lot of the imagery produced then reflects that.

    weren't you against the remain campaigners or just not feeling wolfgang tillmans? are you a.. regrexiter? lol
     
  17. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Golly, thanks for the proverbial scarlet letter you've just painted on my chest! And in Caps! Lol.

    I'm against the employ of art as a tool for political means. As a result I almost always regard the pairing of art and politics with the utmost suspicion. There's a huge difference between making a statement and coercion, imo. The moment you cannot tell said difference it becomes a bit shaky. Tillmans on the other hand steamed ahead and blatantly courted, which I thought was a bit unfair. Little did I know clutching my pearls would be of no consequence.
     
  18. MulletProof

    MulletProof Well-Known Member

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    Well you can look at it as coercion, but it can also be creating awareness and filling up the void of a weakened education system and media outlets... I think art could do more in terms of social commentary, be less selfish, more responsible and involved, and inclusive too, same for entertainment... I find it sad that we live in a world where some people act as if they could abstain from any social responsibility, especially a huge one such as the economic and political direction of a country... they are fine using a huge public platform to tell us personal things like how our relationships should be, how our butt and hair should look, strange ways to advance in life and be successful, what they don't like about pop culture, but god forbid they come to terms with their presence as public citizens and use that same outlet for the sacred things I just mentioned for something so low and dirty and uncalled for such as options for the economic system and its effects. :meow::lol:

    I don't think any of these fields help that much anyway lol.. when you look at these maps and where fear is more prevalent, it's clear you actually have to detach from any notion of urban privilege (social media included) and go 1930s style, door by door, breaking s*it down.. but by the time you try, it's usually too late..
     
  19. Phuel

    Phuel Well-Known Member

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    I’ll have to remind myself to bite my tongue since the political and social ramifications of only a less-than-52%-win is sure to rile up some discontent in the aftermath is something that’s not welcomed in this discussion…

    But on a purely creative, high fashion aspect— I agree with Mullet that such a political development will surely be the motivation for creative inspirations for a new wave of designers … There’s is so much complexity, richness and history to British fashion, and the best of their architects are always such interesting provocateurs to boot. And to be frank, the current offering is hardly living up to its predecessors of the likes of Viv, Galliano and McQueen— all of whom had always been political at some time, in their fashion presentations— and I always think British high fashion is at its best when it has a political message. Maybe this historical development will be the catalyst for the new guard of visionaries. It’s such a shame that it may take an independent Britain to instigate a new wave in high fashion to excite us fashion addicts— something that I would conclude is not even in the periphery of the average English citizen right now.
     
  20. Mel99

    Mel99 New Member

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    What does it matter. I think its time the Europeans got over the fact they are no longer the center of the world re: fashion. Asian markets and indeed the American (North and South), with the growing Middle East, Sub Continent and Pacific markets are so much more worthy of Britain's interests now more than ever as far as fashion is concerned. Even here in tiny little Australia we have conceded that Asia is far more important to us than Europe.
     

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