Ethical fashion

Discussion in 'Trend Spotting' started by bmarberg, Aug 7, 2009.

  1. bmarberg

    bmarberg New Member

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    Hi!

    At the moment I am running more and more into designers and labels who are doing ethical fashion, or other standards, with a lot of new trade fairs coming parallel to major fashion events like the RTW in Paris, the Donna in Milan or the Mercedes Benz Fashionweek in Berlin. Even big European department stores are now offering collections produced with organic cotton, on a low level. Is that a new trend, or a just a kind of subculture. Is ethical fashion right for your daily RTW?

    What do you think?

    -
    Boris
     
  2. Lovin_It

    Lovin_It New Member

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    I do like the idea of ethically produced items which includes clothing. I do buy from second hand stores (charity shops are a partcular favourate of mine) and you don't get more ethical than that.

    For those that like charity (on-line) - shopping there is http://www.oxfam.co.uk/shop which I recomend.

    To answer your question, yes I really like it
     
  3. gius

    gius écrivain

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    we have a related thread in personal style forum, for more ideas
    your organic style


    i don't think it's underground at all. i've been hearing about this for several years now, the use of yarn from bamboo, organic cotton, biodegradable manmade fabrics in the textile industries.i see shops popping up that sell only organic fabrics/products or sell only local designers, their designs also produced locally. and buying secondhand doesn't seem a stigma in the younger generations anymore-- and i even see shows on tv where they go to a secondhand shop to buy things. but they call it 'vintage' or antique
    it's also the same in other markets, like food and coffee. 'fair trade' , 'free range' etc...

    i mostly hear of fashion designers interested in organic/new fabrics and i meet a lot of knitters who buy bamboo,tencel or wool yarn from local farmers. but for clothes, i have met all kinds of people buying second hand clothes or taking these clothes apart and forming new ones, designer or not.
     
    #3 gius, Aug 11, 2009
    Last edited by moderator : Aug 11, 2009
  4. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Well-Known Member

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    I love Barneys' Go Green line, I believe it's called ...
     
  5. saturdaysgirl

    saturdaysgirl New Member

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    I love ethical fashion.
    I love the idea of using organic, natural, locally and sustainably sourced materials which are put together by people of a legal working age, earning a decent wage and in an appropriate environment.
    But the actuallity of this sort of product is far from as romantic as the idea of it is.
    Most of the ethical clothing I've come across has been boring and bland and not fashion forward at all (more like fashion backward).
    Brands such as Edun (whose profits are donated to charity) are great but we need more than just a white printed t-shirt.
    It's also great that big chains such as Marks and Spencer and Topshop are doing their own organic cotton ranges. But, again, they're bland and boring and don't guarantee working conditions.
    Does anyone know of any brands that provide all the romantic idealism I'm looking for that also delivers on style and price?
    I would love to hear about it or is it just impossible to deliver on everything?
    I've found this website: http://www.ethicalfashionforum.com/ but don't have time to have a proper look right now. (hope TFS don't mind my linking another forum).
    Happy hunting. :flower:
     
    #5 saturdaysgirl, Aug 13, 2009
    Last edited by moderator : Aug 13, 2009
  6. shoegal87

    shoegal87 New Member

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    I'm writing my thesis on ethical fashion!
     
  7. gimmethatbag

    gimmethatbag New Member

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    ^Ditto.

    I feel like some "ethical" clothing is just kind of a marketing gimmick, but I like the idea.
     
  8. b9409

    b9409 New Member

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    I am very happy with the current regulations on the fur industry. It is very imporatnt that the animals we wear come from pristine and modern 'farms' instead of horrible ones like in China, or directly from wildlife. That is the ultimate worst. Same thing is true for exotic skins like croc, alligator, lizard, snake, stingray, ostrich and water snake.

    I am just hoping that in a short while, the use of Canadian lynx pelts will also be banned like all the other cats have been. Lynx is the last big cat that is still legal to wear and to skin, and it is really breaking my heart.

    Plus, its fur is truly bulky and truly hideous. I have never once seen a chic lynx coat. Versace did some truly awful ones painted to blue etc. Why it is perceived to be fashionable I have no idea.
     
  9. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Well-Known Member

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    ^ I'm actually not sure about that.

    I think it's better for an animal to have a life in the wild. I buy bison from a herd that ranges (and grazes) through many states. I'm quite certain that the animals' quality of life is better than if they were farmed.

    I also know of someone who only eats meat from animals he hunts himself (usually elk).

    So it seems to me like the same would hold true for non-endangered animals whose skins are used for clothing and accessories.

    Farm life isn't all it was cracked up to be on Green Acres :wink:
     
  10. J.M.L

    J.M.L New Member

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    I wish ethical fashion was more prevelant. I want to design faux-leather and non-leather shoes!!!!
     
  11. gius

    gius écrivain

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    lagerfeld says when you wear a sable coat and you look like you are in a sable coat, then it's the end, it goes no where

    luxury is being in silk or fur but not caring or showing off that you are wearing those things

    it's just another material
     
  12. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Well-Known Member

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    ^ I like that ... best Kaiser quote ever :wink:
     
  13. b9409

    b9409 New Member

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    Well... ok.... yet some materials are hideous. Nothing changes that. I do not necessarily understand your point here I am afraid. Of course one must carry luxury with an air of effortlessness and flair, but some materials just look awful. Lynx coats with their cloudy spots and weird hair lengths never give a good shape imo.

    Corduroy is also just another material. yet I do not remember seeing Babe Paley wearing it just because she is used to luxury and the material wouldn't matter.



    Faux leather and fur are made of petroleum. It is terrible for the environment in every way. its waste is huge, the color pigments are toxic. The level of energy spent to change something as poisonous as petroleum to fibers of fine hair or leather sheets is enormous.

    It is far worse for the planet, and to our natural resources like fresh water beds, oceans and air.




    You need color and quality consistency to create a good coat. And a huge number of animals. You cannot wait to shoot one sable at a time to create a coat which will perhaps use 30-50 of these animals. Then there wouldn't be a fur industry/leather to speak of.

    You need to produce identical animals, and skin them accordingly to create a coat worthy of the time, effort, all these animals' lives and all that money. Chinchilas are basically rats. You need so many of them to be able to put a coat together. At least 50. And I believe they no longer can be found in the wild anyways. There is no way you can you can kill a crocodile in the wild and hope that it will have stunning skin, without any scratches, 'defects' or blemishes, that can be turned into a Birkin. Those defective skins are eliminated: calf, croc, ostrich... no matter what it may be.

    In terms of luxury design, quality control is the key. I say it is important not to rape the natural resources and habitats while we satisfy our needs for these skins and materials. It is only in farms you can get the best skins and furs free off any imperfections. That is how Hermes does it, and that it how it has always been.

    So it is not exactly like eating the meat of an ethically questionable animal like bison or elk. In the long run, maintaining populations where these animals are supposed to live on the planet is far more important. The farm animals are bred for us anyways. Risking to sound a little jaded, but they only exist for one purpose sadly. Same with cows whose milk we drink, and chicken whose eggs we eat.
     
    #13 b9409, Aug 20, 2009
    Last edited by moderator bugonin: Aug 20, 2009
  14. fashionista-ta

    fashionista-ta Well-Known Member

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    ^ Animals are sentient, regardless of whether they live on a farm or in the wild.

    You say 'this is how it's always been,' but au contraire ... factory farming and indeed Hermes are quite recent in the scheme of things.

    Neither you nor I is going to bring everyone around to our way of thinking ... I guess we just need to each use our power as consumers to express our values.
     
  15. gius

    gius écrivain

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    i see.. so you were just talking about the lynx. well if you can make it look something new, why not? i was just responding to what you said about it being fashionable. about it being blue and ugly, but wondering what was fashionable about it
    so i was connecting what lagerfeld said about having a material considered so precious and then dyeing it in a hideous colour or burning it or whatever. it's a real luxury to not care so much about precious items. anyway, so this might have been a reason for the way the lynx looked, what you were talking about
     
    #15 gius, Aug 20, 2009
    Last edited by moderator : Aug 20, 2009
  16. ediewho

    ediewho Riot Bug

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    For me ethical fashion is also related to don't use animals to wear cause we don't need them in our developed societies. I think thats a sign of human cruelty....the whole process is not ethical at all..
    organic cotton is great i mean... i guess its even healthy to wear it....cause i do beleive some cottons contain such a unhealthy substances or something cause thats my point: why do I have old cotton t shirts from my older brother who are and still perfect and they don't get like horrid smells like dead cotton and some kind of news just ripped away and their smell just contains some kind of chemical who gets out by the use and the cleans... its like the cotton t shirt dies or something when its newer...

    i do also beleive some synthetic ones are really a good progress and still in a way such an ethic purposes to avoid any animal involvement.


    Ethical fashion also remarks about who made the clothes that you wear and how that person earn and how much do you pay for it...and where the money goes...

    I do believe all of those things to get accomplished are primary a consumer ones cause at the end of the day corporations want to sell so they will sell us what we will as them to... if not we can really stop buying them... as simple as that.
     
  17. luluposh

    luluposh New Member

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    a personal favourite label which is probably unknown here is laLesso which works with women in East Africa to ensure that they receive the appropriate wages and training, and there is also a huge emphasis on the types of material that they use in their garments.
     
  18. b9409

    b9409 New Member

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    I think ethical fashion also means not to steal your ideas from other designers. On that note, Marc is often guilty.
     
  19. papa_levante

    papa_levante oh! darling

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    I think we've beaten to death the ethical discussion concerning fur, so I won't go there. :lol: But yes, I like what luluposh says about giving people wages for hard work making clothing. I don't know much about this argument, but I don't believe in unethical treatment of employees. Payment should be made where it's due.
     
  20. gius

    gius écrivain

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    that's a good point too

    and also DIY attempts
    to do the same design

    :sick:
     

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