Frost French S/S 04 London

Discussion in 'History of Style : A Remembrance of Things Past' started by Astrid21, Sep 22, 2003.

  1. Acid

    Acid yes

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    more...
     
  2. Acid

    Acid yes

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  3. Acid

    Acid yes

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  4. CaptainJackSparrow

    CaptainJackSparrow El Capitán

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    omgoodness...it cant be said enough....those were amazing!...thank you for sharing!
     
  5. Tinuviel

    Tinuviel New Member

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    the food! So did you see any models eat anything other than veggies, fruits and proteins??
     
  6. Lena

    Lena etre soi-meme

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    :woot: fantastic pictures acid, thanks so much for sharing those with us :heart: (kate looks sooo beautiful)

    as for the collection, hm not bad, just a little bit sad (those colours are not my forte) I loved some of their granny looks and some of those black little funeral dresses, but best of all loved their hair and make-up looks, real cool :heart:
     
  7. Acid

    Acid yes

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  8. fashionablyyours

    fashionablyyours New Member

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    Wow Sean! That must have been a blast! Thank you for sharing!
     
  9. mrrene

    mrrene New Member

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    Here's Suzy Menkes' comment on this and other shows:

    Copyright 2003 International Herald Tribune
    The International Herald Tribune


    September 24, 2003 Wednesday

    SECTION: FEATURE; Pg. 8

    LENGTH: 1154 words

    HEADLINE: Dirty, pretty things ;
    Digging beneath the English rose ;
    The Collections / London

    BYLINE: Suzy Menkes

    SOURCE: International Herald Tribune

    DATELINE: LONDON

    BODY:
    They could have been English roses inspired by Madonna's children's book. The audience sat around decorous tea tables, while out came a model wearing a sprinkle of flower bud pattern that looked childishly innocent. Only the skirt rising high on the rump suggested a more worldly spirit at the Frost French show.

    Dirty, pretty things the title of a hit British movie is the theme of London Fashion Week, which closes on Thursday. With more than the requisite spoonful of sugar, designers are showing for summer 2004 clothes that are primarily pink, flower-strewn and fastened with ribbons and bows. But in the shadows of this English country garden, something more subversive and sexy is going on. The rosebud dress sent out by Jemima French and Sadie Frost (soon to be the ex-wife of the actor Jude Law) was as sweet and colorful as the fairy tea cakes sprinkled with candy. But French called the show "not really pretty-pretty, because the girls were so strong." And as the models strode out in sheer tops, rounded rompers, diaphanous dresses and sturdier overalls chopped down to shorts, they indeed seemed a reflection of the feisty young London woman. That look is epitomized by the sultry prettiness of star guest Kate Moss, who hugged her friend Frost backstage saying: "All those little 1930's flapper dresses and the prints I want it all."

    Several shows took this soft but strong theme, with even Paul Smith stenciling butterflies over the floor of his high-rise show space and on silken dresses.

    Prettiness seems a far cry from the edgy looks London was once known for, when its fashion led the sexual revolution or sent out an angry Punk message. Is the budding of a new English rose really an appropriate response to the current public outcry about asylum seekers (the subject of the director Stephen Frears's "Dirty Pretty Things" movie)? Doesn't the ongoing political crisis over the justification of the Iraq war merit a more aggressive stance? But the anti-war crusade brought to the runways six months ago has faded from the fashion scene.

    Club clothes, lit with glitter, made Preen a rare show with a dark side. Known for its rocker leathers, Preen turned to cotton this season, but still made clothes that seemed complex and edgy, with short bolero jackets padded into bulbous shapes while straps dangled in all directions, from garter belt effects through ribbon-strip backpacks. The aesthetic often seemed too close to Helmut Lang to be original, yet the designers reflect part of the British scene.

    Most of the collections have been pretty straightforward. Make that straightforwardly pretty, as at Jean Muir. This collection of sweaters in fresh aquamarine worn with A-line skirts was a sweet surprise and the most coherent show the four-strong team has shown since the death of the founder in 1995. Color was the key, elegantly used as in a butterscotch or lilac leather trench coat or in a pointilliste stripe-and-dot lily print, making this a fine show. It was also exquisitely crafted, from the toothy edge to a leather sash to lines of buttons used as decoration at skirt hem. Even the gently smiling faces of the models presented a new and less severe image for one of the fashion world's great dressmakers.

    The most charming show came from Jessica Ogden whose ladies choir chirruped its way through South Pacific and other musical hits, while models looking as sweet as sugar candy walked the runway.

    Ogden has always been an intriguing designer, because of her ability to incorporate pieces of vintage fabrics into an outfit or to craft special effects. In this show, the designer had cut out raw and unfinished elements give or take a little quilted cape worn askew across the shoulders. A sundress in sky blue was part of a sailor theme and other dresses with A-line skirts and smocked bodices made for an enchanted look. Even the hard-nosed photographers fell under its spell and gave Ogden a spontaneous ovation.

    Paul Smith aims in his clothes to express the essence of Englishness. His True Brit looks included tailoring worn with shirts in a mix of colorful stripes, with stripy ankle socks giving to shoes the illusion of boots.

    "It sounds corny, but it is all about classics with a twist," said Smith before the show, held in the penthouse of a high-rise building with spectacular views across London. But like the menacing clouds rolling across the skyscape, the collection of sunny dresses suddenly seemed chaotic. Why were we in Rio, where a giant banana was printed on the chest, tutti-frutti patterns eclipsed sweet florals and white feather-trimmed dresses looked fit only for Carnivale?

    The answer was simpler than Smith made it seem. He was showing his lower priced PINK collection alongside the main line. But a designer with such an acute sense of style might have realized that the lands of coffee and tea can't be stirred together.

    Burberry is not showing its London line this season, preferring instead to hold a party, thrown by CEO Rose Marie Bravo to celebrate its new fragrance, Burberry Brit. Guests from super snapper Mario Testino through supermodel Claudia Schiffer partied in the grand mansion, where plaid umbrellas floated like disembodied Mary Poppins in the stairwell and balloons in the signature red, beige and gray colors bounced to the molded ceilings.

    Christopher Bailey, Burberry's young designer, spelled out his definition of Englishness.

    "It is classic, eclectic and whimsical but also sartorial," he said, referring to the tailoring which he believes has to be the foundation.

    *

    That basic building block is so far missing from a London fashion season, which is denuded of big names like Alexander McQueen and Stella McCartney, who both show in Paris.

    Some collections are slight, but cute. Boyd sent out a hippie happy show with bright colors, smiley-face symbols, chains dangling fake fruit and a magic mushroom print. It was a mildly subversive take on the Woodstock years and the striped knits, short skirts and quilted jackets in the inevitable pink made for an upbeat trip.

    Exploring further shores, Gharani Strok, yet another design duo, seemed to be dreaming of Goa or Bali, offering densely embroidered tops and pants and low-back dresses that you wear at sundown with bare feet and a flower lei. A stenciled flower print on a fluttering top and draped jersey dresses emphasized two trends on the London scene.

    Ghost took geometry to extremes with cut-away effects on soft dresses that made the models look like they had been attacked by Edward Scissorhands. The trends were for culotte skirts (streetwise when worn over gauzy pants); for soft shorts; shapely dresses worked with sheer and opaque panels; and for colored buttons used as decoration. That was another way to make things pretty but not too much.

    **

    Suzy Menkes is fashion editor of the International Herald Tribune.
     
  10. mrrene

    mrrene New Member

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    Copyright 2003 Nationwide News Pty Limited
    The Australian

    September 24, 2003 Wednesday All-round Country Edition

    SECTION: WORLD; Pg. 10

    LENGTH: 346 words

    HEADLINE: Frost thaws with a show of flesh

    SOURCE: MATP

    BYLINE: Edwina McCann * Fashion editor

    BODY:
    SADIE Frost looked decidedly happier on the catwalk yesterday when she took her bows at the end of her collection, Frost French, at London's Fashion Week.

    When Frost, 36, last showed the collection in February she was putting on a brave face following recent revelations of her marriage breakdown to actor Jude Law, and suggestions Nicole Kidman was to blame.

    Perhaps her smiles have something to do with her new lover, 22-year-old Jackson Scott. The two were captured cavorting in the sea at the resort town of Tarifa in Gibraltar earlier this month. Frost is in the process of divorcing Law, 30.

    Frost is best known for her role in Bram Stoker's Dracula, and owns the three-year-old Frost French label with friend, designer Jemima French. The label may not be the cutting edge of fashion but it's the best-connected label in town. The pair's friends, including Kate Moss and Supergrass drummer Danny Goffey, can be counted on to add some star value to the audience.

    At yesterday's show guests were treated to a tea party. Little tables replaced the standard front row and were covered with white tablecloths and tea pots. What the guests, including Claudia Schiffer on assignment for US Vogue, saw, was a collection strong in graphic swimwear with floaties as accessories.

    The tea party theme was fitting for the label that does good business in Britain selling 1930s-inspired tea-dresses, and cute decorative knickers.

    Frost has been partying her way through fashion week. On Sunday she attended the Sass & Bide show in Notting Hill. She left her son Rudy's first birthday -- which was celebrated with Moss and her daughter, Lila Grace, born just two weeks after Rudy -- on a red bus to attend the Australian designer's show.

    And Sass & Bide aren't the only Australian label Frost supports, she also attended a party hosted by Wheels & Doll Baby's Melanie Greensmith earlier this month. Jerry Hall, British playboy Dan McMillan, actor Edward Norton, Supergrass's Goffey and a few vintage rockers from the Rolling Stones also partied with Greensmith.

    LOAD-DATE: September 23, 2003
    Document 2 of 22
     
  11. mrrene

    mrrene New Member

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    Copyright 2003 Associated Newspapers Ltd.
    The Evening Standard (London)

    September 23, 2003

    SECTION: A; Pg. 16

    LENGTH: 353 words

    HEADLINE: Everything stops for tea dresses

    BYLINE: LAURA CRAIK

    BODY:
    IT HAS not been an easy time for Sadie Frost. But the 36-year-old mother of four clearly thrives on adversity, for the good news is that the Frost French collection was the best yet. Held at the Royal Horticultural Hall in SW1, guests eschewed the usual bench seating in favour of civilised tables, where champagne cocktails and iced tea were served.

    For a start, it was a good idea to have Frost and partner Jemima French's famous friends in the audience, rather than on the catwalk.

    At past shows, Kate Moss has pole-danced, Rose Ferguson has held aloft a plastic baby and Frost's sister Holly Davidson has blown kisses at the cameras.

    This time, all three watched from the sidelines. The effect was to focus on the clothes rather than on who was wearing them.

    And the clothes were much improved on last season. Fortiesstyle tea dresses in faded rose prints fastened with delicate buttons down the front, while puffsleeved chiffon blouses all looked perfect for that summer picnic on Primrose Hill.

    In the past, the label has been guilty of being too girly, but these were grownup clothes for grownup women.

    True, there were a little too many lace-trimmed camisoles and one too many romper-suits, but perhaps romper-suits are an obsession when you have so many young children - French also has four.

    This could also explain the appearance of black rubber armbands and outsize rubber rings. Then again, perhaps inspiration came from an altogether raunchier source - such as Soho.

    Kinkier still was a baby-pink rubber raincoat, worn with a pretty floral-sprigged bathing suit by British supermodel Jacquetta Wheeler. The message was clear: mothers have sex lives too.

    There was also lingerie aplenty from the duo who design ranges for Debenhams and Liberty. But for once, it played second-fiddle to the clothes.

    Her estranged husband Jude Law may have been absent, but Frost's ex-husband, former Spandau Ballet member Gary Kemp, was on hand to show support, as were a host of fashionable north London friends. Judging by the applause, nobody thought it was pants.

    END

    GRAPHIC: REAL WOMENSWEAR: STRAPPY SWIMWEAR, PAIRED WITH RUBBER BANDS AND RINGS, MIXED WITH FORTIES-STYLE TEA DRESSES IN FADED ROSE PRINTS, ANNOUNCING A PRETTY BUT MORE SOPHISTICATED COLLECTION FROM FROST FRENCH ; ELEBRITY DRESSERS: JEMIMA FRENCH AND SADIE FROST KEPT THEIR FAMOUS FRIENDS SUCH AS KATE MOSS, ABOVE, OFF THE CATWALK AT THE LAUNCH
     

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