Upcoming Shows & Exhibits

Discussion in 'Art & Design' started by softgrey, Mar 21, 2007.

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  1. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    Fashion Exhibitions to See Besides the Obvious

    by Chris Nelson A little exhibit at the Met has just opened (something about punk?). Here are other fashion exhibits worth a look...
    Front Row: Chinese American Designers
    Museum of Chinese in America, New York
    April 26 - September 29, 2013
    — Mary Ping curates this examination at Chinese-American designers who've found success in New York since the 80s, including Anna Sui, Jason Wu, Vera Wang, and Opening Ceremony's Humberto Leon and Carol Lim.
    Artist/Rebel/Dandy: Men of Fashion
    RISD Museum, Providence
    April 28 - August 18, 2013
    — The museum at the Rhode Island School of Design explores the dandy identity over two centuries. The shoe begins, naturally, with Beau Brummell and continues, curiously, through modern dandies Rick Owens and Patti Smith.
    Club to Catwalk: London Fashion in the 1980s
    Victoria and Albert Museum, London
    July 10, 2013 - February 16, 2014
    — Following its blockbuster David Bowie showcase (which remains on view through July 28), the V&A assembles 85 outfits for a major show on the outrageous club looks of the 1980s in London, an imaginative era that still informs contemporary collections.
    Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion
    Seattle Art Museum
    June 27 – September 8, 2013
    — The Seattle Art Museum will play host to a traveling exhibit featuring more than 100 outfits by game-changing Japanese designers, including Rei Kawakubo, Junya Watanabe, Yohji Yamamoto, Issey Miyake, Jun Takahashi, and Kenzo Takada, as well as younger names.
    A Queer History of Fashion: From the Closet to the Catwalk
    Museum at FIT, New York
    September 13, 2013 - January 4, 2014
    — This exhibition follows the extent to which gay men and women have made significant contributions to fashion for more than a century, touching on androgyny, dandyism, subculture, street styles, and drag.
    The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk
    Brooklyn Museum, New York
    October 25, 2013 - February 23, 2014
    — After stops in Montreal, Dallas, San Francisco, Madrid, and Rotterdam, this retrospective chronicles the startling breadth of Jean Paul Gaultier's contributions to both pop culture and couture.


    hintmag.com
     
  2. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    Beyond Rebellion: Fashioning the Biker Jacket

    The Fashion Institute of Technology’s School of Graduate Studies and The Museum at FIT present Beyond Rebellion: Fashioning the Biker Jacket. Organized by graduate students in the Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory, Museum Practice program, the exhibition explores the genesis of the biker jacket and its evolution into a high-fashion garment. Beyond Rebellion: Fashioning the Biker Jacket traces the rise of the black leather jacket from utilitarian outerwear to iconic symbol of rebellion, function, and “cool.” Clothing from leading labels such as Jean Paul Gaultier, Yves Saint Laurent, and Rick Owens are featured. The biker jacket emerged in the early 20th century as a protective garment to shield motorcycle riders from the elements. Over the years, the mystique of the motorcycle jacket has attracted not only bikers, but movie stars, young adults, and fashion designers.
    The exhibition opens with a Perfecto jacket by the American outerwear company Schott. The Perfecto style, introduced by Irving Schott in 1928, featured durable black leather horsehide, exposed zippers, metal snaps, and an asymmetrical front closure. By the 1950s, due in part to its appropriation by motorcycle gangs—associations fostered by movies such as The Wild One—the jacket had become an emblem of the outlaw biker. Other objects in this introductory section will show how the Perfecto’s iconic classic design and early history influenced fashion designers. This is exemplified by a 2009 Yves Saint Laurent jumpsuit that integrates characteristic design elements of the biker jacket, such as the asymmetrical front and exposed zippers.
    The exhibition’s second section includes work by fashion designers inspired by the countercultural groups that adopted the biker jacket as an expression of social defiance. Punks and leathermen utilized design details such as metal embellishments and construction that exposed or exaggerated the body as a marker to stand out from the rest of society. Featured is a high-end jacket by Jean Paul Gaultier that incorporates a metal spike on each elbow and stitching details on the shoulders that recall armor and exaggerate the size of the upper body.
    The final section explores avant-garde reinterpretations of the classic biker jacket that push the boundaries of its original symbolism and design. A 2005 Comme des Garçons ensemble from the bikerballerina collection juxtaposes a sculptural masculine black leather jacket with a girlish pink gingham and tulle skirt. While this ensemble and the Perfecto jacket of the 1950s serve very different functions and appeal to different consumers, the allure and mystique of the jacket remains.
    Fashion Institute of Technology
    Students in the Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory, Museum Practice MA program in FIT’s School of Graduate Studies have collaborated with The Museum at FIT to present Beyond Rebellion: Fashioning the Biker Jacket. The School of Graduate Studies provides advanced professional education in seven distinctive areas, promoting excellence in the post-baccalaureate study of fashion, business, art, and design. The school offers programs leading to the MA, MFA, and MPS degrees, and is dedicated to advancing research in the creative industries and fostering innovative collaborations that link students and faculty with industry and professional partners worldwide.
    The Museum at FIT, which is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is part of the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT). It is the only museum in New York City dedicated solely to the art of fashion. Best known for its innovative and award-winning exhibitions, the museum has a collection of more than 50,000 garments and accessories dating from the 18th century to the present. Like other fashion museums, such as the Musée de la Mode, the Mode Museum, and the Museo de la Moda, The Museum at FIT collects, conserves, documents, exhibits, and interprets fashion. The museum’s mission is to advance knowledge of fashion through exhibitions, publications, and public programs. Visit fitnyc.edu/museum.
    Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) is a State University of New York (SUNY) college of art, design, business, and technology that has been at the crossroads of commerce and creativity for 70 years. With programs that blend hands-on practice, a strong grounding in theory, and a broad-based liberal arts foundation, FIT offers career education in more than 45 areas, and grants associate, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees. FIT provides students with a complete college experience at an affordable cost, a vibrant campus life in New York City, and industry-relevant preparation for rewarding careers.
    Museum Hours
    Tuesday–Friday, noon–8 pm; Saturday, 10 am–5 pm. Closed Sunday, Monday, and legal holidays.
    Admission is free.
     
  3. eugenius

    eugenius Active Member

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    I'm still kicking myself for missing the JPG exhibit last time I was in NYC. Shame on me. :hardhead:

    But I certainly won't miss the Nick Cave exhibit here in Boston. The kid-friendly interactive portion makes me wish I actually had a jr. eugenius of my own:

    http://www.icaboston.org/exhibitions/exhibit/nick-cave/
     
  4. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    for those who are/will be in paris

    [​IMG]

    1er mars 2014 au 31 août 2014

    Les Arts Décoratifs – Mode et textile
    107 rue de Rivoli
    75001 Paris

    Tél. : 01 44 55 57 50
    Métro : Palais-Royal, Pyramides ou Tuileries
    Autobus : 21, 27, 39, 48, 68, 69, 72, 81, 95

    * i won't be able to get to paris for the show, but this is the next best thing...
    looks and sounds fantastic...
    http://charlieporter.net/stories/14155
     
  5. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    The Dancing Designs of Modern Art Kimono


    [​IMG]
    Woman’s Kimono with Abstract Hemp-Leaf Pattern (Japan, early Shōwa period, c. 1935), silk plain weave, stencil-printed warp and weft (heiyō-gasuri meisen), Costume Council Fund (all photos © 2014 Museum Associates/LACMA)

    Many of us, when we picture kimono, envision the traditional Japanese garment covered in similarly traditional images: blossoming floral motifs, soaring or leaping animals, mountain peaks and cresting seascapes in Ukiyo-e style. But cross-cultural exchange between Japan and the West started in earnest during the Meiji period (1868–1912), causing the spread of different technologies and styles in both directions. By the time the Shōwa period rolled around in 1926, Japanese kimono looked quite different than they once had, with patterns that that were far more abstract and modern.
    [​IMG]
    Woman’s Kimono with Undulating Vertical Lines
    Japan (mid-Shōwa period, c. 1950), silk plain weave, stencil-printed warp and weft (heiyō-gasuri meisen), Costume Council Fund (photo © 2014 Museum Associates/LACMA)

    Opening on Saturday, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s (LACMA) exhibition Kimono for a Modern Age surveys this period of Japanese fashion innovation. The show presents 30 never-before-seen kimono from LACMA’s permanent collection. All date to the first half of the 20th century — chronology you might guess just by looking at the garments, which show a strong affinity with modern art of the period.
    “By the early Shōwa period (1926–89), vibrant and dynamic designs inspired by art movements such as Art Deco, Surrealism, and Abstract Expressionism, as well as patterns commemorating an important arctic expedition and the beginning of space exploration, appear on kimono,” says LACMA’s press release. The designs have the bright colors swaths of Fauvism and the bold, geometric patterns of Art Deco; the “undulating vertical lines” of one recall the curving script in Cy Twombly’s paintings. But this isn’t just simple borrowing — it’s the shaping of Western modes of art making to fit a distinctly Japanese form. The resulting garments are both artifacts of their time and amazingly current. Herewith, a few of the kimono from the show.
    [​IMG]
    Woman’s Unlined Kimono (hitoe) with Curvilinear Bands of Stripes (Japan, early Shōwa period, c. 1940), silk plain weave, stencil-printed weft (yokosŏ-gasuri meisen), purchased with funds provided by Grace Tsao

    [​IMG]
    Woman’s Kimono with Mountain Landscape (Japan, mid-Shōwa period, c. 1950), silk plain weave, stencil-printed warp and weft (heiyō-gasuri meisen), purchased with funds provided by Jacqueline Avant

    [​IMG]
    Woman’s Kimono with Geometric Pattern (Japan, early Shōwa period, c. 1940), silk crepe (omeshi meisen), stencil-printed warp and weft (heiyō-gasuri meisen), Costume Council Fund

    [​IMG]
    Woman’s Unlined Kimono (hitoe) with Waves and Dots (Japan, early Shōwa period, c. 1935), silk crepe (omeshi meisen), stencil-printed warp (hogushi-gasuri meisen), aluminum-leaf-paper-wrapped rayon supplementary weft, Costume Council Fund

    [​IMG]
    Woman’s Kimono with Large Dewdrops (Japan, early Shōwa period, c. 1935), silk plain weave, stencil-printed weft (yokosŏ-gasuri meisen), purchased with funds provided by Grace Tsao

    [​IMG]
    Woman’s Kimono with Diagonal and Vertical Stripes (Japan, mid-Shōwa period, c. 1950), silk plain weave, stencil-printed warp and weft (heiyō-gasuri meisen), purchased with funds provided by Grace Tsao

    [​IMG]
    Woman’s Kimono with Abstract Design (Japan, mid-Shōwa period, c. 1950), silk plain weave, stencil-printed warp and weft (heiyō-gasuri meisen), purchased with funds provided by Grace Tsao

    Kimono for a Modern Age opens at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles) on July 5.


    hyperallergic.com
     
    #105 softgrey, Jul 9, 2014
    Last edited by moderator starrb81477: Jul 9, 2014
  6. eugenius

    eugenius Active Member

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    Fifty Years Of John Waters

    You couldn't pay me enough to see any of the fashion shows @ Lincoln Center..but an exhibit on John Waters, you don't need to ask me twice.

    "The career of John Waters—one of the most influential and beloved underground filmmakers in the history of American movies—has a symmetry to it ironically at odds with his films’ trashy chaos. His first six features are enduring staples of the midnight-movie circuit: maniacal exercises in high-camp shock humor, each with the emotional pitch of an opera and content that wouldn’t be out of place in a psychological text on sexual fetishes. His next six—made with bigger budgets and well-known stars—find Waters refining his style and burrowing deeper into his favorite film genres, but they unmistakably represent attempts to subvert Hollywood from within. On top of their oft-discussed self-conscious irony and thematic obsessions (sex, celebrity, social exclusion), Waters’s movies, starring his friends (David Lochary, Mink Stole, Mary Vivian Pearce, and the immortal Divine), are also odes to the rhythm and texture of life in Baltimore and improbably tender visions of domestic communities held together by their own unsentimental, idiosyncratic forms of affection. One of the characters in Multiple Maniacs, turning to his current object of desire, perhaps best sums up the spirit of Waters’s life and work: “I love you so ****ing much I could ****.”

    See more for less with a 3+ Film Package or get really filthy with a $99 Access Pass. Opening Night and Celluloid Atrocity Night are not included in the package or pass.

    Wear your John Waters love with our bright pink tote, available for purchase online or in our theaters.

    Plus, get Film Comment's digital anthology featuring John Waters's guilty pleasures, photography, and starlets for only 99 cents!"


    http://www.filmlinc.com/films/series/50-years-of-john-waters-how-much-can-you-take
     
  7. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    [​IMG]

    Ryoji Ikeda • test pattern [times square] U.S. Premiere

    Wed, Oct 1–Fri, Oct 31
    11:57pm–midnight
    Times Square
    Free
    Times Square
    Check screen locations

    Ryoji Ikeda’s test pattern is brought outdoors and reimagined for Times Square as the October Midnight Moment. From 11:57pm to midnight each night in October, 47 digital screens over five blocks will be taken over by tightly synchronized, flickering black-and-white imagery—mining data for mathematical beauty.

    Exclusive Sound Experience
    Midnight Moment Exclusive Sound Experience at Times Square

    Thu, Oct 16, from 11:57pm–midnight
    Duffy Square in Times Square

    Enjoy Ryoji Ikeda’s test pattern [times square] with a special coordinated soundtrack. Headphones will be available to the public on a first-come/first-served basis to view the work as a fully immersive experience. Pick up your headphones starting at 11pm. Viewing will begin at 11:57pm.

    * I went last night but decided not to get the headphones as there was a restricted area for people who were borrowing the equipment and I didn't want to have to stay with the crowd...
    so i saw it the way it is being shown every night in October---
    it's really quick but it's really good...
    definitely recommend it...
    wish I had known about it earlier so I could go see the concert at the Met...


    [​IMG]


    Ryoji Ikeda • superposition

    Fri & Sat, Oct 17 & 18
    at 7pm
    Metropolitan Museum of Art
    SOLD OUT
    Please call 212-570-3949 for ticket availability.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    1000 Fifth Avenue (at 82nd Street)
    New York, NY 10028

    A music, visual, and theater work at the intersection of art and science, superposition by Japanese composer and visual artist Ryoji Ikeda, is an immersive experience: an orchestrated journey through sound, language, physical phenomena, mathematical concepts, human behavior, and randomness, all simultaneously arranged and rearranged in a theatrical arc that obliterates the boundaries between music, visual arts, and performance.

    fiaf
     
    #107 softgrey, Oct 17, 2014
    Last edited by moderator starrb81477: Oct 17, 2014
  8. BerlinRocks

    BerlinRocks New Member

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    I wanted to create a thread ... but I'm not sure ...
    so Louis Vuitton Fondation opened earlier this week ...

    some people were not happy about this, and posted on social media their torn invitation for the opening ... making the world knows about their feelings towards this opening.

    Here is an interesting article, signed by very famous european intellectuals (writers, philosophers, curators etc.) .... Even Christian Bernard, 1 of the most influential european curator/director of Mamco (Geneva), signed it.
    :shock: and let me tell you he counts amongst his friends some of the richest collectors in the world ... B)
    That guy is soooo nice and smart, and everything. i could listen to him for hours ...


    jerome bel's invitation
     

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  9. BerlinRocks

    BerlinRocks New Member

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    Google Translation

     
  10. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    Feb 03 2015


    Book Launch | THE LOOK with Elizabeth Diller, Dennis Freedman, Matthew Monteith and Henry Urbach

    Tues | 6:30 pm


    Swiss Institute and ARTBOOK invite you to join Elizabeth Diller, Dennis Freedman and Matthew Monteith in a conversation moderated by Henry Urbach celebrating the publication of THE LOOK, by Diller Scofidio + Renfro with Matthew Monteith.
    Commissioned by the DESTE Foundation for Contemporary Art
    Elizabeth Diller is a founding principal at Diller Scofidio + Renfro, a 115-person interdisciplinary design studio that integrates architecture, the visual arts, and the performing arts. Recent and ongoing projects include the renovation of Lincoln Center, the High Line, the ICA Boston, and CultureSHED in Hudson Yards.
    Dennis Freedman is the Creative Director of Barneys New York and was formerly the Creative Director of W Magazine for 10 years. He has also edited books by Philip-Lorca diCorcia, and Maurizio Cattelan.
    Matthew Monteith, a former Fulbright Scholar and recipient of the Abigail Cohen Rome Prize in Photography from The American Academy in Rome, is currently Assistant Professor of Photography at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston. His editorial work has appeared in many magazines, including GQ, The New York Times Magazine, Interview, W, and Dwell. In 2007, Aperture published his monograph Czech Eden.
    Henry Urbach is the Director of the Philip Johnson Glass House and previously served as Curator of Architecture and Design at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA).
    The Look In 2013 the Deste Foundation commissioned Diller, Scofidio + Renfro to curate a capsule collection and integrate the selected works into an independent project. The Look, a narrative in 18 scenes about youth, aging and identity, examines the notion of the classic in fashion and architecture.
    Please RSVP to rsvp@swissinstitute.net
    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
     
  11. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    nya nya nya...
    two of my fave things...
    japan and cats!...

    :woot:...:clap:...:bounce:...

    LIFE OF CATS: SELECTIONS FROM THE HIRAKI UKIYO-E COLLECTION
    Fri, Mar 13 – Sun, Jun 7, 2015

    Since arriving in Japan aboard Japanese ships transporting sacred Buddhist scriptures from China in the mid-sixth century, cats have proceeded to purr and paw their way into the heart of Japanese life, folklore, and art. Life of Cats: Selections from the Hiraki Ukiyo-e Collection illustrates the depth of this mutual attraction by mining the wealth of bravura depictions of cats to be found in ukiyo-e woodblock prints of the Edo Period (1615-1867).

    Ninety ukiyo-e prints in the exhibition are on loan from the esteemed Hiraki Ukiyo-e Foundation whose holdings are revered in Japan. Select prints, paintings, sculptures, and other works borrowed from U.S. collections complement these prints, making the exhibition over 120 artworks. With cross-cultural and multi-generational appeal, Life of Cats takes viewers on a wild ride through Japan’s love affair with our feline friends.

    Roughly 50 items will be replaced with new works halfway through Life of Cats—Rotation 1 will be on view from March 13 until April 26; Rotation 2 will be on view from April 29 until June 7.

    Life of Cats is divided into five sections: Cats and People, Cats as People, Cats versus People, Cats Transformed and Cats and Play.
    japansociety.com

    here's a screencap...
     

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    #111 softgrey, Feb 26, 2015
    Last edited by moderator starrb81477: Feb 26, 2015
  12. ssgghh

    ssgghh New Member

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    ^ That looks like a fun exhibition. Too bad it´s not in the UK.
     
  13. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    Björk

    March 8–June 7, 2015

    The Museum of Modern Art presents a retrospective of the multifaceted work of composer, musician, and singer Björk.
    The exhibition draws from more than 20 years of the artist’s daring and innovative projects and her eight full-length albums to chronicle her career through sound, film, visuals, instruments, objects, and costumes. In the Museum lobby, instruments used on Biophilia (2011)—a gameleste, pipe organ, gravity harp, and Tesla coil—play songs from the album at different points throughout the day. On the second floor, in the Marron Atrium, two spaces have been constructed: one is dedicated to a new sound and video installation, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, for “Black Lake,” a song from Björk’s new album Vulnicura (2015); and the second is a cinema room that screens a retrospective in music videos, from Debut (1993) to Biophilia. On the third floor, Songlines presents an interactive, location-based audio experience through Björk’s albums, with a biographical narrative that is both personal and poetic, written by the acclaimed Icelandic writer Sjón, along with many visuals, objects, and costumes, including the robots designed by Chris Cunningham for the “All Is Full of Love” music video, Marjan Pejowski’s Swan Dress (2001), and Iris van Herpen’s Biophilia tour dress (2013), among many others.
    Entry to the Björk exhibition is included with general Museum admission. Timed tickets are required for the Songlines portion of the exhibition, and are available same-day and on-site only, at no additional charge, on a first-come, first-served basis, beginning at 10:30 a.m. daily.
    MoMA members may reserve same-day tickets for Songlines on-site only, at no additional charge, on a first-come, first-served basis, beginning at 8:30 a.m. daily. Timed tickets are required for the Songlines portion of the exhibition during Member Previews and Member Early Hours. Exclusive Member Early Hours will be held daily between 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. Member Early Hours are open to MoMA members, with the exception of Global members. Space is limited.

    moma.org

     
    #113 softgrey, Mar 4, 2015
    Last edited by moderator starrb81477: Mar 4, 2015
  14. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    Lauren Bacall: The Look
    Gallery FIT
    March 3 – April 4, 2015

    Join the conversation on Twitter using hashtag #BacallTheLook. View the online exhibition for more, including a gallery guide and lesson plan.

    Lauren Bacall: The Look is the first exhibition to exclusively celebrate the film and theater star’s unique style. Bacall’s own garments take the spotlight in this exhibition, which also explores Bacall’s personal relationships with several of the fashion designers who dressed her. Organized by graduate students in the Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory, Museum Practice MA program, this exhibition examines Bacall’s distinctive style within the context of her modeling, film, and theater careers.

    Selections from Bacall’s personal wardrobe, as well as from her film and stage roles, are displayed alongside photographs, magazine pieces, film posters, and archival footage. Approximately one dozen garments have been selected from a collection of 700 that Bacall donated to the museum between 1968 and 1986. Lauren Bacall: The Look includes work by designers Marc Bohan, Pierre Cardin, Norman Norell, Yves Saint Laurent, and Emanuel Ungaro, focusing on pieces from the 1960s and 1970s.
    The exhibition opens with a photograph of Bacall at age 19, taken by Louise Dahl-Wolfe and chosen by Harper’s Bazaar editor Diana Vreeland for the magazine’s March 1943 cover. The photograph shows Bacall’s full, natural eyebrows and softly waved hair—along with the alluring look of ease and self-confidence that became her trademark. Other images that demonstrate how “The Look” evolved are included in the exhibition.
    A vivid pink wool coat by Norman Norell, worn by Bacall in the 1964 film Sex and the Single Girl, is on display. Bacall established an ongoing relationship with Norell, as well as with a number of other important designers. In 1968, she hosted "Bacall and the Boys," a CBS television special that presented the fall collections of some of her favorite designers. The exhibition displays photographs of Bacall with her “boys,” who include Marc Bohan, Pierre Cardin, Yves Saint Laurent, and Emanuel Ungaro. Clips from the television special, along with a selection of the garments Bacall wore in it, are in the exhibition. Highlights include a Cardin mini-dress and a Christian Dior evening gown. The fuchsia Cardin dress is devoid of adornment but is accented with molded 3D pyramid shapes. Ostrich plumes at the wrists and hem of the silk jersey Dior gown give it a dramatic flair. Bold design choices such as these extended to Bacall’s off-screen wardrobe as well, as seen in a Norell “subway coat” ensemble. A modest tan overcoat opens to reveal a lining emblazoned with gold sequins and a matching sequin sheath dress. A beaded ensemble by Yves Saint Laurent demonstrates Bacall’s audacious attitude when it came to dressing.

    Throughout her life, Bacall borrowed style cues from menswear. Examples in the exhibition include an ivory silk pantsuit by Norell and a black silk pantsuit by Ungaro. Both are impeccably cut and share certain elements: wide legs, high waistlines, and kerchiefs at the neck that reference a man’s tie. Images of Bacall relaxing at home complement these garments. While the photographs were taken decades apart, Bacall’s look from one to the other is remarkably unchanged and altogether chic. Her ease and confidence were ever-present elements of “The Look.”

    *saw this today...it was quite good...the highlight was a film of her with several designers inc- YSL, Pierre Cardin, etc...
    small but stunning...


    fit.edu
    :flower:
     

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  15. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    Yves Saint Laurent + Halston: Fashioning the ’70s


    celebrates the two designers who defined the sexy and glamorous fashions of the 1970s. This is the first exhibition to juxtapose their work and analyze the way they dealt with similar themes and aesthetics during the height of their careers. Both designers are equally represented by the approximately 80 ensembles and 20 accessories that are arranged thematically in an environment designed to evoke the style of this singular, dynamic era in history.

    Drawn exclusively from the holdings of The Museum at FIT, the exhibition offers a unique perspective on two of the best-known fashion designers in modern history. The museum’s collections hold the Halston archives—the most comprehensive records of his work in the world—as well as a vast array of significant Yves Saint Laurent pieces donated by important clients, fashion editors, friends, and colleagues of Saint Laurent. These include Lauren Bacall, Marina Schiano, Aimée de Heeren, Mary Russell, and Tina Chow. It is worth noting that the first major retrospective exhibition on Halston was organized at the museum in 1991 by the late curator Richard Martin.

    *also saw this today...
    it's small but very interesting...
    i guessed who designed what wrong about 20 % of the time, which really surprised me...
    a fun show...


    fit.edu
     
  16. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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  17. Pricciao

    Pricciao Active Member

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    Thank you softgrey for all these information!
     
  18. dauphine

    dauphine Active Member

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  19. softgrey

    softgrey flaunt the imperfection

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    Stage Design by Ming Cho Lee
    April 28, 2016 - September 11, 2016


    Stage Design by Ming Cho Lee is a retrospective exhibition of celebrated and influential set designer Ming Cho Lee (b. 1930, Shanghai, China) that features original scale models, sketches, and photographic reproductions. The exhibition provides an in-depth exploration of Ming Cho Lee's creative process by displaying the preparatory materials for his set designs alongside documentation of the performances, and chronicling the evolution of his practice from his groundbreaking, abstract set designs of the 1960s and 70s to his more recent hard-edge treatments. For over fifty years, Ming Cho Lee has served on the faculty at Yale School of Drama, including as the co-chair of the design department. As a recipient of the National Medal of Arts in 2002 and the Tony Award® for lifetime achievement in 2013, Ming Cho Lee is one of the most acclaimed living set designers in the U.S. This exhibition is a project of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

    Stage Design by Ming Cho Lee and related programs are made possible by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York Legislature. MOCACREATE and other educational programs are generously supported by the Wells Fargo Foundation and the J.T. Tai & Co. Foundation.

    Image credit: Electra, Collection of Billy Rose Theatre, August 5, 1964, Delacorte Theater, New York Shakespeare Festival

    moca.com
     
  20. AnaD

    AnaD Member

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    The Work of Issey Mikake- National Art Centre, Tokyo

    An exhibition devoted to designer Issey Miyake will run from Wednesday, March 16 to Monday, June 13, 2016 at the National Art Center, Tokyo. The Center has considered design to be an important exhibition theme since it opened in 2007 and is devoted to presenting a wide range of artistic expressions and proposing new perspectives. This exhibition, MIYAKE ISSEY EXHIBITION: The Work of Miyake Issey, promises to be an unprecedented event, focusing on the entirety of Miyake’s 45-year career, from 1970 to the present.
    Miyake has consistently presented new methodologies and possibilities for making clothes, while always focusing on the future. It all began in 1960 when Miyake, a student at Tama Art University, sent a letter to the World Design Conference, which was being held for the first time in Japan that year. The letter took issue with the fact that clothing design was not included in the event. At that point, Miyake’s notion that clothing is not merely “fashion” ― i.e., something that changes with the times ― but a form of design that is closely connected to our lives on a much more universal level was already apparent. Miyake has always explored the relationship between a piece of cloth and the body, and the space that is created as a result, unrestricted by any existing framework. In addition, along with his team of designers, he persistently undertakes research and development to create clothing that combines both innovation and comfort.
    This exhibition will shed light on Miyake’s ideas about making things and his approach to design by examining his entire career, from his earliest work to his latest projects, and his explorations of greater creative possibilities in the future. This exhibition will provide viewers with an opportunity to expand the boundaries of their thought and stimulate their creativity, allowing everyone, young and old alike, to experience the joy of creation.

    Source: nacp.jp

    I hope this goes on tour!
     

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