DIY fashion ideas

Discussion in 'Workshop - DIY - Do it yourself' started by Ceptuouse, Jan 26, 2007.

  1. Deborah

    Deborah New Member

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  2. Cocoly

    Cocoly Member

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  3. gius

    gius écrivain

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  4. daniellat

    daniellat Fashion Designer

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    they must be, see how the lines just drape around the armhole? if they werent attached to something under they would fall off the shoulder, how would they keep them in place?
     
  5. gius

    gius écrivain

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    i thought they might use grommets too
    and then put lacing through, for the armhole
    something not too visible

    it looks like there are metal snaps in some parts
     
    #65 gius, May 14, 2009
    Last edited by moderator : May 14, 2009
  6. Cocoly

    Cocoly Member

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  7. Cocoly

    Cocoly Member

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    [​IMG]
    leggins

    refinery29pipeline
     
  8. Frenger.

    Frenger. New Member

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    well this is just a really simple idea its nothing specific, but theres this paper you can get from office works, its called transformation paper and you can print whatever you want onto it using an ink printer then iron it onto a shirt or whatever-its not expensive. Its about 20 Australian Dollars for a Packet of 5 A4 Sheets of paper, its really easy and you can do anything with it.
     
  9. daniellat

    daniellat Fashion Designer

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    ive use it a lot of times but if you print it on a stretchy thing like a tshirt or the print is full rather than just the outlines it kinda breaks after wearing it, its really cool if you want to print like your name on a tshirt or something like that but if your graphic is big, the first time you wash it it will fall apart. but i guess there are better quality papers to work with, ive only used HP inkjet paper though
     
  10. gius

    gius écrivain

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    i used to research iron-on transfers ..

    i was told by a guy who does these on t-shirts for a living..
    you can use Epson Durabrite printers. they use durabrite inks.. made of waterproof pigment that doesn't crack/fade under 100+ washings. he says in the States, the printer version C88 costs $80 only
    he says Avery papers are good if you want to make a few shirts. you can do transfers on both light and dark. but if you want to make a lot more t-shirts, say up to 15, he likes the company bestblanks.com. It's like $25 for a set of 25 sheets.. cheaper. And they don't peel or crack if you use it with the Epson Durabrite
     
  11. Frenger.

    Frenger. New Member

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    hmm i might try out the Epson Durabite.

    I've never actually had a problem with big images cracking, even after a wash. It happened once on a small image. It was on a streachy tight singlet though, and the image was on my chest so it cracked a little bit.

    I guess it depends on the quality of the paper.
     
  12. Cocoly

    Cocoly Member

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    [​IMG]

    adding fringes

    source refinery29pipeline
     
  13. Cocoly

    Cocoly Member

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  14. Cocoly

    Cocoly Member

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  15. Cocoly

    Cocoly Member

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    oh, i have so many new ideas.
    all from Pixie Market

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  16. princessaud

    princessaud New Member

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    Anyone knows how to rip stockings/fishnets without destroying them? i've tried ripping my stockings but somehow they always end up looking totally crappy. TIA :heart:
     
  17. Cocoly

    Cocoly Member

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    found from threadbanger.com:

    Have any stockings that you ripped months back but haven’t had the heart to toss? Get out those scissors or a razor and vertically glide over a few spots gently (very gently) while making a couple holes in other areas. Focus on the upper thigh and down the knee. And when the trend is caput you can go back to the original diy idea, make a headband!


    one new idea again
    [​IMG]
    from shopbop.com
     
  18. Cocoly

    Cocoly Member

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    asos.com slashed top
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. lucy92

    lucy92 Administrator

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    the guardian had a very good feature about making DIY paul smith shirts, maison martin margiela shirts and a temperley dress (source - guardian.co.uk)

    here are the instructions for the margiela waistcoat.
    Maison Martin Margiela says: This is a variation of a piece we did for the Artisanal 2009 collection. "Evaluate your skills and select materials that are easy to work with. Don't compromise your taste or you will look, and feel, like an idiot:
    1. Take an old waistcoat or find one in a charity shop.
    2. You will need a craft knife, spray-on adhesive, clear parcel tape, newspapers, a ruler (preferably metal) and a surface to cut on.
    3. Lay the newspaper on a flat surface, as if you were about to read it, and cut it into strips around 1.5cm wide.
    4. Spray the outside of the waistcoat with the adhesive spray.
    5. Stick the strips of paper to the waistcoat at different angles, pressing and folding as you go.
    6. Using the tape, cover the whole waistcoat in a single layer of tape, tucking the ends of the paper strips and the tape neatly inside.
    7. Tape more strips of newspaper onto the inside of the waistcoat, along the bottom and neckline, so that they hang down outside the waistcoat.
     

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  20. lucy92

    lucy92 Administrator

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    continued...from the guardian

    more pics (they match with the steps)
     

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