Need Information about Getting an Agent / Representation ... for a Stylist

Discussion in 'Careers, Education & the Business of Fashion' started by Naila, Aug 26, 2008.

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  1. Naila

    Naila New Member

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    Hi All,

    I am looking for a fashion stylist agent? how is the best way to approach them? any tips? thanks
     
  2. BetteT

    BetteT Mod Squad Team Leader

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    All I have heard is that they want you to have a good level of existing clientelle and lot's of good tears in your portfolio before they will consider you ... at least the big artists' agencies.. So it's more like what can you do for them ... what you bring to the table. Sort of a "catch 22" ... you need to be working steadily in order for them to accept you for their clients.

    So I know a lot of stylists and artists who decide that they don't want an agency, for this reason ... they are finding their own work and don't have to pay something like 20% of that to the agency. Although ... sometimes an agency can get you the really big gigs that you would not otherwise get ... the big companies that only use agency stylists. So it's seems like it would be good, to take you up to the top levels if you are making a decent living at it now. Just what I've heard ... but from many sources ....
     
  3. Naila

    Naila New Member

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    Artist representation for stylist

    Hi,

    I am an aspiring/emerging stylist and I am looking for an agency to represent me. i am looking for a small boutique agency interested in representing new stylist. also what would be your advises? what are they looking for? and most importantly what are the requirement to get into.

    I have been contacted by an agency who asked me a lot of expenditure to join them, want to see what you think:


    1The artist will pay 20% commission on the gross fees of jobs (editorial, catalog, and advertising) booked by Management On artist’s existing clients, the agency will deduct 15% commission on the gross fees of jobs.

    the agency will contribute 20% toward the artist’s printed promotional expenses. The balance 80% is the responsibility of the artist.

    3the agency requires the artist to have a reserve of $500.00 on account for promotional expenses incurred by the agency.

    The agency will charge a $20.00 Website Fee per

    the agency will charge a fee to the artist for adding a new page to the website.

    Fed Ex and Messenger Services postage mailing costs for sending out portfolios/mailers will be 100% charged to the artist.

    Fed Ex Account Artist must provide a federal express account

    Artist is 100 % responsible for providing 2 complete books with shipping case (original tears or prints) to the agency
     
  4. BetteT

    BetteT Mod Squad Team Leader

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    Having never signed with an agency ... I'll comment but based only on what I have heard, not what I know for fact. So ... I could be way off in my assesment ... take it with a grain of salt. And if anyone else has a different experience, I'd love to hear it here.

    • The 20% fee to the agency seems in line ... at least that is what modeling agencies charge.
    • I would not like the 15% to the agency if I booked with any previous clients that I already had, but I've heard that this is common and that is why agencies want actively working stylists ... because of the clients they bring to the agency.. Something to consider if you already have a good client base ... you would just be giving your money away. Maybe that might be negotiated, if they want you badly enough?
    • Suprised that an agency would pay any portion of your expenses (20% of promotional expense) ... never heard of this before .... that's a plus.
    • $500 reserve ... normal, because they spend money on you that you must pay back... they don't want you skipping town.
    • $20 website fee ... if it's to upload your pics on thier site, normal, but not always charged, depends on the agency.
    • FedEX charges paid by artist ... normal
    • 3 updated portfolios ... normal ... it's how they promote you to interested clients.
     
  5. Lee Lee

    Lee Lee New Member

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    Fashion Stylist Agent Pros & Cons

    Hello, I hope someone can help. I graduated from the London College of Style 2 years ago and have been doing some work as a fashion stylist on a portfolio building /Testing basis. 2 pieces of my work have been published which I was very happy about :clap:. However, I would like to progress to paid work and wondered if I should get an agent to represent me and get more work (although I don't mind doing some testing work as it is all good experience) Any advice would be welcome.

    Also, when testing you have to buy the clothes yourself (and then return them :wink:) which can be stressful or borrow from up and coming designers like I did for my shoots. Can anyone tell me if it is easier to borrow clothes if you have an agent representative?

    Thank you :heart:
     
  6. BetteT

    BetteT Mod Squad Team Leader

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    Merging with existing thread on this topic.

    Finding an agent who will rep you is a major challenge. (whether your are a photographer, stylist, makeup artist... pretty much all the same). It's different for us than for a model, who just has to have "the face and body" and can be coached to success by a good agent if she photographs well. To get an agent, you need to already have a serious book of paid work and editorials. So ... first you must make some headway in your career and be able to prove to a prospective agent that you are hire-able and skilled with the right contacts ... so that you are marketable to even more clients. It is sort of a "catch 22" ... you need to get work before you get an agent, and you need an agent in order to get work. Just how it is .....


    And no ... it's not the agent that makes a difference in pulling wardrobe ... it's the gig. In other words, if the designer/shop will get publicity, they will consider lending wardrobe. So for a magazine editorial or sometimes an on line editorial, or a celebrity photo op (where they will be named) ... those are the most desirable situations for a designer or shop. For small shops and start up designers ... they may accept photos with usage rights to use them for their own advertising purposes. Usage rights must be personally granted by the photographer (not anyone else on the crew like the stylist) because he owns them, by law.

    Go here for more information about pulling wardrobe:

    - FASHION STYLISTS: CLOTHES AND CONNECTIONS!

    Related to agency representation ... or not:
    - Freelancers (Stylists, Makeup Artists, Photographers, etc.) - Marketing Yourself

    And more information about creative agencies might be found in this main thread about becoming a Fashion Stylist ... a very long, multi part thread;

    - All About Becoming a Fashion / Wardrobe Stylist You may wish to search the thread, when you are in it ... go to the nav bar above the posts, and typing in agent or agency ... there may be specific discussion about this topic.
     
    #6 BetteT, Nov 2, 2016
    Last edited by moderator Natasa: Nov 2, 2016

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