The Business of Magazines #4

Discussion in 'Magazines' started by Thread Manager, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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    Another clickbait from NYT. It’s nothing. Just full of surmises and basically unbacked claims.

    Writer: the word “boomer” is in + ALT just wrote an article about Anna = hmmmmmm I think I have a piece for you.

    “You wouldn’t challenge Anna in a group meeting — that’s just not how our operations work,” another editor said.

    In what world can any editor think that they can challenge the EIC? Make suggestions, sure. Pitch in ideas, sure? Challenge the EIC. Ma’am sit down. Even Vogue Singapore editors know better.

    Sure Vogue is no longer a sales powerhouse, but at the end of the day, the loyal readers are still there. Anna knows her core readers and what they want month after month. At a time when the world is preparing for a recession, that becomes very important. No sane executive will risk ushering a new EIC in. One cannot couple uncertainty with another uncertainty.

    Anna’s job is safe. Edward is safe. Alt is safe. Even Farneti is. All EICs are safe. Their salaries however is a whole different topic.
     
    #2041 MON, Apr 26, 2020
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2020
  2. tigerrouge

    tigerrouge don't look down

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    Vogue has been going since 1892, weathering almost a hundred years of world events before Wintour stepped into its timeline. And history has not stood still over that period - there have been highs and lows, boom and bust.

    But it would take a bit of work to analyse that history in relation to any current crisis - not when you can regurgitate the same old article about magazines that's been written over and over again during the past few years, and put BOOMER in the headline.

    And having had time to read a few of Radhika's Vanity Fairs before they reach their final destination in the recycling bin... they are so incredibly dull. The experience is like being in the company of someone who's gained several degrees from all the right universities, but at the expense of developing a personality.
     
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  3. SophiaVB

    SophiaVB Well-Known Member

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    Not to dwell because Graydon's not without his own issues but I am really enjoying Air Mail. The quality of the writing is fantastic & there's a lot of humor in it. It's unfortunate to see the same topics made so serious at VF.
     
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  4. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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    Heard that Vogue Turkey will be back soon (Summer 2020)

    Not sure how COVID-19 will affect their release (not entirely sure of the state of things in Turkey), but nevertheless, this is good news for print.
     
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  5. 8eight

    8eight Well-Known Member

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  6. Srdjan

    Srdjan Well-Known Member

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    I'm not finding any of the Glamour Iceland's social media, are they closed?
     
  7. magsaddict

    magsaddict Active Member

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    ^ I think they closed a little while ago. There's truly very few Glamour editions left anywhere :(
     
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  8. axiomatic

    axiomatic Well-Known Member

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  9. SophiaVB

    SophiaVB Well-Known Member

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    Could he be any more annoying???
     
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  10. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Beautifully written. Vulnerable and honest. Who knows what kind of future anyone is going to have, but he’s young and I wish him the best.
     
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  11. caioherrero

    caioherrero Well-Known Member

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    Omg, where is Vogue Paris?
     
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  12. CTSunshine

    CTSunshine Member

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    News from South Africa:

    South African publisher of Cosmopolitan to close shop from 1 May


    Associated Media Publishing, the publisher of Cosmopolitan, House & Leisure, Good Housekeeping and Women on Wheels, is closing its doors permanently on Friday 1 May because of the "devastating" impact of Covid-19, which has resulted in the closure of printing and distribution channels.

    "This is the most difficult decision I have ever had to make," the publisher’s CEO, Julia Raphaely, said in a statement released on Thursday. "We never thought this day would come, but we are left with no choice."
     
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  13. helmutnotdead

    helmutnotdead Well-Known Member

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    Honestly, I'm starting to get a little bit nervous about this.
     
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  14. Srdjan

    Srdjan Well-Known Member

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    Heartbreaking. Cosmo SA has had quite a history there.
    So, if I'm right, South Africa's left with only Glamour now. Elle, Marie Claire and Grazia were all closed previously.
     
  15. 8eight

    8eight Well-Known Member

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  16. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Low in Print This Summer: Magazines
    A coronavirus-related slump in advertising and difficulty creating content has led some publishers to rethink print issues for certain titles this summer.


    As the coronavirus weighs heavily on advertising and makes creating usual fashion and lifestyle content difficult, magazine executives have been forced to rethink their summer issues.

    At Hearst Magazines, some changes have already been put into play. Elle, Harper’s Bazaar and Marie Claire will each publish just one issue this summer — a combined June, July and August edition. Last year, Elle and Marie Claire each produced three separate issues and Bazaar combined only June and July. Cosmopolitan plans to combine July and August, compared to separate issues in 2019.

    “Hearst Magazines regularly reviews frequency across the portfolio and makes decisions based on marketplace conditions. It was a proactive decision to create a handful of special “summer” issues across select brand titles light of these uncertain times,” a Hearst spokeswoman said.

    “Readers can still expect the highest-quality editorial products and our advertisers will still be able to connect with the millions of people who turn to our brands for inspiration, entertainment and tips each day,” she added.

    It’s not known if this is just a temporary measure or if this will become the norm. But even before the crisis stuck, Hearst, like many publishers, had already been reducing the frequency of some titles as print advertising and readership continued to shrink.

    Esquire’s print frequency was recently quietly reduced from eight to six issues (it was at 10 at the start of 2019), while Town & Country already had a combined June, July and August issue.

    Hearst’s rival Condé Nast, which Friday implemented pay cuts and furloughs, has also altered its print schedule, but stressed that does not mean fewer issues. It is simply shifting some to later in the year.

    “In light of this unprecedented moment, we made the decision to publish a June/July combined issue,” a Vogue representative said. It’s understood there are no plans to reduce issue count with other combined issues this year, but instead to add a holiday issue, while the 2021 print schedule has not been changed.

    Condé Nast Traveler has also been shifted to be heavier later in the year. This includes having an August/September issue instead of July/August. Its frequency was reduced from 10 to eight in 2017.

    “In light of the pandemic, which has effectively halted the global travel industry, we have embarked upon a number of new initiatives as we navigate how to shift course,” the magazine said in a statement. “One such initiative aims to provide our audience and partners with more lead time as we look to gain more clarity on a global recovery.” That, presumably, means when people might start traveling again, as airlines have cut capacity by up to 95 percent and many countries have advised prospective tourists not to visit this summer.

    Vanity Fair will publish a June issue and then July and August will be combined. Last year June and July were combined. There will be no changes to GQ.

    Outside of the Hearst/Condé bubble, other publishers are rethinking print to various degrees. Already struggling W Magazine’s May issue won’t be published on time and it’s not known if the summer issues will be published at all as the print staff has been furloughed by the fashion magazine’s new owner, Future Media Group.

    Playboy, the iconic men’s magazine launched at the end of 1953 by famed founder Hugh Hefner, made the decision early on in the crisis to cease print altogether. In March, it said the economic disruptions from COVID-19 were too much for the already strained print operations to bear, with the spring issue, currently available for preorder, set to be its last.

    Bustle Digital Group has also postponed the release of its first print product due to COVID-19. When it acquired fashion, music and cultural site Nylon, Bustle chief executive officer Bryan Goldberg said that he hoped to bring special print editions out around events like Coachella, with the first one set for this year. But as previously reported by WWD, that has been postponed until fall of 2021. BDG is insistent, though, that it’s committed to a print issue, which will be the only one in the whole company.

    “[Print has been delayed] because of the coronavirus and what it’s done to the industry and there’s uncertainty there and it’s a big project and undertaking for us and we’ll have to hire people. We’re still really excited about it,” said Emma Rosenblum, editor in chief of BDG’s lifestyle arm, which includes Bustle, Elite, Romper and The Zoe Report, earlier this month.

    Across the pond, delays and combinations are happening, too. British style magazine Dazed will suspend the print edition of its summer issue and, instead, create a special digital moment with contributions from readers and its creative community around the world. For now, Dazed’s fall print issue is set to go ahead as planned.

    Stylist and Time Out, free magazines that are handed out in public places, are also on hiatus.

    Back in the U.S., People and InStyle owner Meredith Corp., which recently implemented pay cuts for 60 percent of staff, has not made any changes to print frequency. It does have contingency plans, though.

    “As a contingency, we went through and said if we have to pull back from a capacity standpoint what would we continue to print or how would we prioritize those things, so we’ve got all those plans in place,” Meredith Magazines president Doug Olson told WWD in March. “Obviously, People would sit at the top of the list because it’s a weekly. So we would continue to focus on it and then it really depends on where we are at the close of these different issues what would be next.”

    As for why there will be fewer print magazines around this summer even as publishers boast that readership and subscriptions are booming, Alice Pickthall, a senior analyst at Enders Analysis, thinks it’s a combination of both production and advertising.

    “A lot of the magazines coming out at the moment — these issues are set two months in advance. So producing high-quality new content is going to be incredibly difficult, especially with teams working from home,” she said. “You’re very limited in what kind of new material you’re able to shoot. I guess that’s probably one of the reasons why, especially in the fashion industry, it’s going to be quite difficult to produce the same kind of high-quality output as previously.”

    She added that at the same time, advertising is falling across all categories. “There’s kind of a double-edge sword with magazines in particular. What we’re seeing is across all media even when audiences are up, advertising is falling.”

    Pickthall thinks that the crisis could lead to some permanent changes in the industry.

    “The whole industry is going through a period of structural decline and arguably the coronavirus has only accelerated that decline. Issues were already a lot thinner than they used to be. We’ve had fewer titles as more have gone online,” she said. “I think we could expect to see that trend to continue and to accelerate.”

    source | wwd
     
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  17. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    From yesterday....
    Pamela Drucker Mann, chief revenue officer, Condé Nast about the state of the media business amid the pandemic. She discusses how the publishing giant is navigating managing costs and ad revenue.
    source | adage

     
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  18. SophiaVB

    SophiaVB Well-Known Member

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  19. axiomatic

    axiomatic Well-Known Member

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    Not sure if this has been posted elsewhere...

    Nadine Leopold: 'I’m in a place where I’m just not scared'

     
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  20. MissMagAddict

    MissMagAddict The future is stupid

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    Condé Nast appoints Danielle Carrig as first-ever global Chief Communications Officer

    Condé Nast CEO Roger Lynch today announced the appointment of Danielle Carrig as the company’s first-ever global chief communications officer. Carrig joins the executive leadership team overseeing the combined global Condé Nast business, and will lead the company’s global communications strategy, including all internal and external communications, media relations, crisis management and employee engagement. She will act as a strategic counselor and advisor to Lynch and senior leadership, working closely with communications and brand teams around the world to advance the company’s global narrative and growth priorities. Carrig’s appointment completes the formation of Lynch’s global executive leadership team, having previously announced the appointments of a global Chief People Officer, Chief Financial Officer and Chief Marketing Officer at the end of 2019. Carrig will begin her new role on May 26.

    “Danielle is a seasoned global communications executive with extensive media, entertainment and digital content experience, and a strong network of media relationships,” said Lynch. “At this pivotal time for our company, I’m thrilled to have her as a strategic partner as we work to transform and grow our business.”

    Carrig joins Condé Nast from VICE Media Group where she most recently led all communications strategy worldwide for the youth media company, as its global chief communications officer. While at VICE, Carrig oversaw a team in North America, Europe and Asia charged with advancing communications strategies for the business, spanning television, news, creative agency, digital publishing and studio production, in 35 cities around the world. She helped define the new corporate narrative and priorities, and aligned its workforce with the company’s overall mission. Prior to VICE, Carrig led teams at Netflix responsible for visual communications, events, public relations and talent relations. She drove creative strategies to amplify awareness of the streaming media company's global brand, talent and content, including both scripted and unscripted TV series, documentaries and feature films.

    "While the media industry, and our world, are going through such change and disruption, it’s a privilege to join a team and company always rising to the top as a voice of purpose and connection,” said Carrig. “The future of information and entertainment is in our hands and I look forward to working with our teams worldwide to help define all that media can and will be together.”

    Carrig also spent eight years at A+E Networks where she oversaw the communications and publicity strategy for Lifetime, in addition to leading the company’s award-winning public affairs efforts. While at A+E, Carrig’s work received the Television Academy Governor’s Emmy Award for outstanding public service, and she’s been named by Variety as one of “Hollywood’s New Leaders.” She has also been recognized by the Alliance for Women in Media and Dress for Success for her work advocating on behalf of women.

    Carrig holds an M.A. in women’s studies from UCLA, and a B.A. in political science, humanities and gender studies from Valparaiso University.

    source | condenast
     

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