The Business of Magazines

Discussion in 'Magazines' started by Cicciolina, Mar 7, 2008.

  1. KINGofVERSAILLES

    KINGofVERSAILLES Utterly-Unknown Member

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    “Do you ever think about how Phoebe Philo’s Céline was not the CEO but really the CEO’s wife?”


    Is he for real?
     
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  2. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    If PamBoy continues with these petulant, bait-ish posts he will be the EIC with the shortest tenure ever. I believe Princess Deena still holds that honour.
     
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  3. kokurox

    kokurox Active Member

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    Pam Boy is no longer at Love he left to be with Katie Grand at "The Perfect Magazine" which is more like a marketing agency than a magazine which is where the money is.
     
  4. SophiaVB

    SophiaVB Well-Known Member

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    So is Love just done? They maybe should have just kept it because it was kinda an asinine marketing agency to begin with...
     
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  5. caioherrero

    caioherrero Well-Known Member

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    Sally Holmes is the new editor in chief of Marie Claire.
    Aya Kanai is out.
     
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  6. KINGofVERSAILLES

    KINGofVERSAILLES Utterly-Unknown Member

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    She's accepted a position at Pinterest. Marie Claire is probably going to cease print publication soon, so I'd say she made a wise decision.
     
  7. Lola701

    Lola701 Well-Known Member

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    Despite the fact that LOVE is better than CRFB, I’m always surprised by how « irrelevant » Katie is in the industry compared to someone like Carine. She is a big name obviously but I can’t think of any talent she has put in the spotlight (stylists, models...etc) with LOVE. I feel like their excessive enthusiasm don’t match the project. If I was Pierre, I would try my hardest to be at M le Monde


    He clearly never went to the stores and I think what he should have said was « YSL by Hedi Slimane was the CEO’s wife »...
    After all, Salma Hayek wore it!

    I’m interested in his perspective because I think it’s great to have someone from the young generation with a real interest in fashion and some real knowledge but I think he needs to learn from Robin Givhan and not act like a Fan Boy.

    Obviously, he loves Celine and he will be on their PR List soon but I think Fashion Critics needs to have a little bit of distance sometimes.
     
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  8. vogue28

    vogue28 Mod Squad Team Leader

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    What a short stint from Aya Kanai at Marie Claire. Magazines need editors who're pillars of strength right now, so fingers crossed Sally Holmes stays around for the long haul and Marie Claire isn't going anywhere.
     
  9. GivenchyAddict

    GivenchyAddict Well-Known Member

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    She nurtured Eddie Campbell and Cara Delevingne (according to her) then you have Fran Burns who used to work for her. Katie is not a giver, she is a taker for her own benefits. Pierre will stay close to them to the end as they (Marc and Katie) opened to him the gate of fashion. Now he thinks so highly of himself. He is for me an ALT 2.0.

    None of his articles was striking. When I read him I just picture a very huge fanboy so happy to interview big names. Some of his tweets are relevant and nice to start a conversation and it is indeed enjoyable to see how he is passionate about Fashion but I don't think he will last.
     
  10. TommysBaby

    TommysBaby Active Member

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    So right after Hedi's Celine was criticized Pierre started tweeting about the previous CDs and how they were terrible? He certainly relates to Hedi more than I realized. As if Hedi's Celine is the beacon of diversity and inclusion. Can he TRY to have an iota of objectivity?
     
  11. velvetandsilk

    velvetandsilk Member

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    Meet Martina Bonnier, Editor in Chief of Vogue Scandinavia
    By Laird Borrelli-Persson

    August 19, 2020
    Vogue Scandinavia, the 28th member of the Vogue family, will launch as an English-language digital and print platform in 2021, representing Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, and Iceland. Martina Bonnier, who has a long history in fashion media, is the editor in chief. “I’m so happy for this. We have been longing for a Vogue Scandinavia for years and years and years,” she says. Because “the Scandi style is so significant, and the world is looking [at us] right now,” explains Bonnier, news of the new edition often elicits a surprise. “Don’t you have it already?” is a typical reaction.

    Bonnier is undaunted by the challenge of launching during the pandemic, and seems to be taking a blank-page approach to the project. “We are really trying to dare to do things very fresh and new and in a different way. I think it’s actually the right time to do [this] now,” she said on a Zoom call. The editor is a member of the Bonnier publishing dynasty, which stretches back more than 200 years. But during our chat she talked not at all about the status quo, emphasizing instead her interest in disruption and finding new ways of doing things, both on her platforms and industry-wide: by reducing travel, for example, or combining regional fashion shows.


    “We have to change,” she says. “We have to have another approach, and I want to be very much more interactive with our readers and viewers. That’s very, very important for me, [and] also a way to not be so elitist. That’s why I started this hashtag #myvoguescandinavia. I have already five different countries to cover: We want more opinions; we want more voices. I want a lot of voices!”

    As was suggested in the announcement video, Vogue Scandinavia is a deeply personal proposition for the editor. Indeed, the Condé Nast platforms (operating under a license agreement with Bonnier’s Four North Stockholm), will become competitors in an arena in which the Bonnier family’s publications are players. Within the context of the editor’s personal history, bringing Vogue to Scandinavia might be seen as a triumph of feminism—and a defense of the importance and impact of fashion.

    Born in Sweden, Bonnier has lived there, in Denmark (“I always say that my first alphabet was actually in Danish,” she notes), Europe, and North America, most recently in New York City, where she feels very much at home. “There are always things behind the scenes that color your history. Until I was 20 years of age I lived in five countries, in 15 different cities,” the editor has said, concluding that it made her by necessity a self-reliant and observant person. It’s also given Bonnier lived international experience and the opportunity to see how people outside the Nordics view the region, which is important. Vogue Scandinavia will speak both to locals—Bonnier underlines that the new Vogue will support the whole region, and not just Sweden because she is a Swede—and to Scandiphiles.

    Anchoring Bonnier’s peripatetic childhood was a love of fashion, which the editor can trace back to her very early days when her mother sewed her clothes. A dress has always been more than a dress for Bonnier, who grew up in what she describes as a male-dominated family, in which she found it difficult to express herself and defend her passion. “I mean, people don’t take [fashion] seriously, or they think, Oh, you can do that as your little hobby, or something like that,” she says. “I think it has made me stronger because I always had to fight for everything, to fight for my place, to fight for [fashion] being really something important that women do and that it compares to any other business. Because it’s a hard business: It’s global, it’s a lot of money, it’s fast decision-making, a lot of people.”

    That Bonnier ended up working in fashion at all was an act of personal courage, as she tells it. Mentored by an older and much respected relative, Bonnier secured internships in Paris and Gothenberg, Sweden, to learn the business. With her training completed, Bonnier was told she’d have to find employment without the family pulling strings, which she did. “I started as a writing journalist,” she relates, “but as I’ve always been so interested in fashion, I took the courage and asked if I could be a fashion assistant instead.” Though her editor at the time was surprised, Bonnier began as an assistant and worked her way up. “What I have,” she says today, “is that I have done it all. I can write. I can style. I know how it is to be behind the camera. Then I can write a book. I’ve been a lot on TV. I’ve done it all. So I feel that I can always lean back and say, ‘Well, I know this craft. I know how to do it.’ I just learned by doing.”

    It’s not insignificant that Bonnier is sitting in a book-lined room on our Zoom call. “I love fashion history,” she admits. “When you give me a fashion history book, I will be gone for hours. I love it because it says so much about women.” Asked how she’s observed women’s lives changing over the course of her career, Bonnier points to the Swedish model, which advocates equal footing for the sexes. “I think we have come a very, very long way in equality here in Sweden,” she says. “The salaries, you need to work on that, but if you compare them internationally, you will feel that we are very, very equal. I think it’s a thing that more people can learn from, because it actually works.”

    That search for balance is also built into the Nordic fashion system, which is mainly focused on an “accessible” mid-sector, rather than the high end, with the aim of fashion for the many, instead of the few. It’s widely hoped that the editor will likewise prioritize inclusivity. Equity, in environmental terms, is also a main concern, and the focus of the new platform. Scandinavians have a deep—almost religious, notes Bonnier—relation to nature and by extension to sustainability. “We have a saying: ‘You don’t have any bad weather, just bad clothes,’” she notes. [Meaning you adjust to nature, not the other way around.] “It’s also how we think of fashion here. It’s very practical, it’s functional, and it really needs to work outdoors.”

    Vogue.com
     
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  12. Srdjan

    Srdjan Well-Known Member

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    I really doubt Aya Kanai would leave so early if Marie Claire wasn't going anywhere. My guess is that by the spring or summer 2021, US Marie Claire will only be a website.

    It's devastating how 2020 fast forwarded the demise of magazines. If the pandemic never happened, we would enjoy all these magazines a few years longer.
     
  13. conspicuousconsumer

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    “Don’t be defeatist dear, it’s very middle class.”
    Sorry lol I had to make a smart aleck type comment. It is very sad to see this pandemic increasing the closure of so many things. Lord and Taylor is now gone or going and magazines are closing.
    But we can’t give up the fight, for those that love print media. We have to buy multiple copies of issues that we like albeit that is getting harder to do with such banal content the magazines keep publishing. Almost every publication is trying to be something that they are not. Obviously trying to appeal to new and real paying customers is not working. The top people at these companies are really messing up. Yes I know one must embrace new things but there comes a point where I think it can be a lost cause. Anyways I will stop rambling. Hopefully Marie Claire will make it through this somehow.
     
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  14. axiomatic

    axiomatic Well-Known Member

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    Marie Claire’s Editor in Chief Aya Kanai Heads to Pinterest

     
  15. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that was indeed fast, and I'm not even sure she left her mark yet. Quite ironic when you think that she had an interview 2 weeks ago speaking about how MC was her dream job.
     
  16. MON

    MON Well-Known Member

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    Woah that was short
     
  17. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    Edwina McCann on being 'ashamed' of Vogue's lack of diversity and publishing through COVID

    By Mariam Cheik-Hussein | 7 September 2020

    After reflecting on Vogue Australia’s 60-year history, editor-in-chief Edwina McCann says she was “ashamed” by its lack of diversity and has vowed to improve representation both inside and behind the publication.

    Australian media’s lack of diversity has been widely noted over the years, with a 2016 PwC report finding that 83% of the nation’s entertainment and media workforce is monolingual, speaking only English at home. For Vogue Australia, published by News Corp Australia, McCann says looking back at its past editions revealed a particular need for better Indigenous representation.

    “For our 60th we really had to have a good look at our archives and I was quite ashamed really, and I would say this over my editorship as well, at the lack of Indigenous storytelling we had done,” McCann tells AdNews.

    “We made a commitment to change that and to do that consciously, and for it to be ongoing. We work with this incredible woman Yvonne Weldon who has really become a close friend of the brand and our editors can go to her for advice … You’re never going to please everyone. I’m never sure what the right balance is but I do know that it’s something that must be addressed and needs to be changed.”

    The lack of diversity at Vogue has also been highlighted internationally, with Black creatives using the viral #VogueChallenge, which started in the US, to place themselves on the cover of the magazine.

    “We’ve heard from a lot of readers who have said to us that they grew up never seeing anybody like them in any magazine, nevertheless Vogue,” McCann says.

    “The Vogue challenge was about people owning our brand. Vogue has been around 100 years internationally, 60 in Australia, and the fact that people still see it as a brand they are proud to put on top of their head, on their own social media, that’s something we should be very proud of but also leaves us with the responsibility to make sure we are more inclusive because you can see how much we matter to a very broad section of society.”

    For the first time in the magazine’s history, all 26 global editions of Vogue will unite under the theme of ‘hope’ in the face of the pandemic. Vogue Australia will feature artwork by Anangu/Aboriginal Pitjantjatjara woman Betty Muffler on its cover - the first time an artwork has covered the magazine. McCann says Vogue is also working with AIME (Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience) to roll out an internship program to boost diversity within its team.

    Throughout the pandemic, McCann says the publication has performed better than expected, weathering the loss of airport sales with a boost from supermarkets and subscriptions.

    McCann says the title was “lucky” to have launched Vogue VIP last year, with Vogue print and digital subscriptions up 54% year-on-year, according to the publisher. Print and digital readership was up 24.1% year-on-year to 782,000, according to Emma figures.

    While many publishers paused their print products at the start of the pandemic, such as Bauer’s Harper’s Bazaar which was later closed, to deal with the drop in advertising revenue, McCann says that was never on the table for Vogue.

    “We’re not deserting audiences, we're not even deserting properties that we know that people want us to deliver in whichever format we can at the moment,” she says.

    “But we also know that the jewel in our crown is our print product. And without our print product, what is Vogue really? I feel like male audiences are very digitally focused, and we can see that with the growth in GQ. But women still do love the tactile experience of reading a magazine and enjoy the beauty of our advertising even, not just our editorial.”

    McCann says advertisers also haven’t deserted Vogue, including big sponsors Westpac for Vogue Codes and American Express for Vogue Fashion Night Out, which is pivoting to Fashion Night In this year with a focus on boosting retailers and designers through the pandemic slump.

    “We also were lucky in that the advertisers at Vogue really have stuck with it [the magazine],” McCann says.

    “From the outset, Vogue partners, both in Australia and globally, didn’t desert us. We're an advertising-based revenue model and to be able to rely on your partners during this time and work with them is a pretty lucky place to be really.

    “They also understand their audiences and we’ve been hearing that parts of the luxury market are holding up particularly well. There are a lot of Australians who might otherwise be traveling or spending their money on other things who are shopping at home.

    “It is an odd market at the moment. There are glimmers where people are doing really really well, and of course there's a lot of people who are really really doing it tough. So I guess where we sit, with the majority of our partners being luxury brands, that has, relatively speaking, held up pretty well.”

    AdNews
     
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  18. slayage

    slayage Active Member

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    Vogue Singapore is set to launch tomorrow on Wednesday but looking at their shop online, it seems like the covers of their first issue are already there even though they have countdowns on Instagram going on.

    96E36248-354B-4540-B668-8C30954CB0D7.jpeg
     
  19. Benn98

    Benn98 Well-Known Member

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    None of what I see so far looks promising!
     
  20. GivenchyAddict

    GivenchyAddict Well-Known Member

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    The issue is already available. Daniela Paudice is involved as international creative fashion director at large.... A whole mess from the cover to the back cover.
     

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